Posts Tagged: philosophy

The Story Is the Concepts: Philosophizing with Ryan Ruby

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Ryan Ruby talks about his debut novel The Zero and the One, the challenges of pacing and plot, and the fun of inventing a book of philosophy for the novel.

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #17: Oppression, Ownership, Turkeys, and Roses

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Politics has become a bloated balloon on the horizon of our days, marked with the face of the Pr*sident, grinning under his orange corona like a demented sun-god, a raucous Ra. It burns.

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The Rumpus Interview with Larissa MacFarquhar

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Larissa MacFarquhar discusses her book Strangers Drowning, why she finds nonfiction so compelling, and how she gets inside the minds of her subjects.

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The Rumpus Interview with André Alexis

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André Alexis discusses his latest book The Hidden Keys, puzzles, chance, divinity, and the Toronto literary community.

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Into Paradox

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Over at the New York Review of Books, Peter E. Gordon writes about Søren Kierkegaard’s legacy through the lens of Daphne Hampson’s biography, Kierkegaard: Exposition and Critique, which she dedicates to S.K. for helping her grasp “with greater clarity why I should not wish to be Christian.”

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The Rumpus Interview with Jonathon Keats

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Experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats discusses Buckminster Fuller, three-wheeled cars, domed cities, climate change, and cameras with a 100-year exposure time.

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The Rumpus Interview with Max Ritvo

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Max Ritvo passed away on August 23, 2016. Earlier this summer, he spoke with Sarah Blake about his debut collection Four Reincarnations, writing with and about cancer, and how language is a game.

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The Hope Whose Death It Announces

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Poetry is defined by a failure to live up to the hype it generates, promising divine transcendence through a medium that is essentially human. This is the paradox Ben Lerner articulates in his dissertation on The Hatred of Poetry. At The New Republic, Ken Chen doesn’t buy it: You get the sense Lerner’s intellectualized peevishness […]

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Tennis as Art Form

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Understanding tennis as aesthetic phenomenon involves returning to that word Wallace insists on using in his discussion of Federer: beauty. At Guernica, Greg Chase discusses the new collection of David Foster Wallace’s essays on tennis, String Theory, in which tennis is investigated as an art form in light of Kant’s aesthetic philosophy on words like “beauty” […]

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Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On

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This past weekend, thousands of people convened to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. The Elizabethan bard’s formal innovations are widely revered as some of the most influential literary developments in history, so much so that we almost overlook what he was even writing about: …for Shakespeare, life itself is a type of lie.

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Deep Conditioning with Wilson Phillips

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“Don’t become a professor,” he said. “I’d rather you become a garbage man. They get paid more and have better benefits.”

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

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Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism.

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The Internet as Place

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It seems counterintuitive that technology could facilitate these kinds of humanistic affirmations. That the voices of the oppressed could find not just a home, but an incredibly powerful platform, online. Yet, here we are reaching out, speaking out, and asserting our humanity in ways that could imperil our very lives, offline. Rob Henderson writes for […]

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Nietzsche the Space Man

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It is often said that who controls the past controls the future but Nietzsche is one of the first to anticipate the power of speculation—that he who controls the future, controls the present.

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Michel Tournier and the Novel of Ideas

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Do novels think?

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Seeing is (Not) Believing

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Does perception provide us with an accurate picture of reality? To what extent is our environment a reflection of our psychological state? UCLA Philosophy Professor Josh Armstrong examines all sorts of thought-provoking questions in his critique of John Searle’s Seeing Things As They Are in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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