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Posts Tagged: photography

The Most Terrifying Art Project in the World

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Here’s a totally normal thing that exists: a lake with a pH so far to the base end of the scale that when birds crash-land in it, they not only die but also calcify.

Of course, like any everyday person would do, photographer Nick Brandt gathered up the mummified bird corpses, posed them, and took pictures of them for his new book Across the Ravaged Land.

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August Kleinzahler and Alec Soth in SF

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Bay Area readers won’t want to miss this City Arts event with poet/essayist August Kleinzahler and photographer/publisher Alec Soth.

They’ll be at the Nourse Theater in November, talking with award-winning San Francisco writer Steven Winn about the latest in their wide-ranging, international careers.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jamel Shabazz

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For over thirty-five years, Jamel Shabazz has photographed the pulse of New York urban life. Dating back to the early days of hip-hop and B-boys, to the arrival of crack cocaine and the HIV/AIDs epidemic, and to the global commoditization of street style, Shabazz’s portraits tell the stories of everyday lives

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Storm-Torn Relics

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“That red convertible we were so proud of looks as though it is about to be struck by a meteor. And every moment — the prom, the dance recital, the snowman’s construction — is painted now with bright yellows and rich reds and burnt oranges, the colors of our storm-tossed autumn.”

Sandy has curated a photography exhibition on New Dorp Beach in Staten Island.

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Impersonation and Self-Portraiture

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On July 14, SF MoMA will be opening a retrospective of the work of photographer Cindy Sherman.

Starting with her series Untitled Film Stills, Sherman’s photographs have consistently challenged the limits, meaning, and power of self-portraiture. In an article for the New York Review of Books, critic Sanford Schwartz characterized Sherman as “an impersonator—which in her case means being a creator of people, and sometimes people-like creatures.”

Alongside the retrospective, Sherman has curated a film series, which continues with The Beaver Trilogy on July 12, at 7:00pm.

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“Not Where They Hoped They’d Be”

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The Atlantic captures photographs of graduates who have been unable to find a job in their fields of study and now find themselves in underpaid service sector jobs.

“From a cook in Athens with a degree in civil engineering to a waiter in Algiers with a masters in corporate finance, these young people have spent years studying hard to compete in the 21st century, only to discover that even the most desirable qualifications mean little in a distressed global economy.”

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“The Faces of Black Men”

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“Somewhere between the inaccurate and distorted media images of the black male super predator and the black male superhero, live the majority of black men.”

The Maynard Institute for Journalism Education has created a Tumblr dedicated to moving past media myths and representing “the everyday lives of black men.” Anyone can submit images with brief descriptions of “the boys, men and male-identified folks in your life.” Check out the blog’s archive.

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Ramblers Bone

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On April 5th, photographers Mikael Kennedy and Sean Sullivan will embark on a month-long road trip through the American West. Their Ramblers Bone project will send them “east into the high deserts of New Mexico before turning north through the Rockies, into the wild lands of Montana, across to the Pacific for the last leg of their journey, bringing them down the California coast where the wilderness meets the water.”

You can follow their travels here.

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On Zoe Strauss and Thinking Big

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At The Nation, Barry Schwabsky writes about photographer Zoe Strauss’ “Ten Years” exhibition. Exploring Strauss’ evolving approach to photographic techniques, portraiture and storytelling, Schwabsky argues that her artistic triumphs come from “thinking big”.

“Strauss’s work was a runaway from birth, and by putting her photographs on billboards she is returning them to the streets from which they sprang… But more than that, Strauss’s images are not only about but for the urban rough-and-tumble.

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Fire Island Flaneurs

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It starts with the watch, always.  Boarding the ferry at the Sayville Harbor on Long Island, I remove my watch and zip it within the special pocket of my duffel.  Vacation begins the moment we start the short trek over to the narrow strip of land that stretches thirty miles, just south of the city.

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