Posts Tagged: poetry

I Have Wasted My Life

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Over at the Paris Review, Dan Piepenbring talks about James Wright’s famous epiphanic poem Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota, in conjunction with Ann Beattie’s new story Yancey, and the general discussion and controversy of the poem’s famous last line: “I have wasted my life.”

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Preserving Poetic Packaging

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Remember the literary packaging that Jonathan Safran Foer developed with Chipotle? Well, someone at Yale has decided it’s worth holding onto—the Beinecke Rare Book Library will soon add a complete set of the cups and carry-out bags printed with the work of Toni Morrison, George Saunders, and others to its collection of “publications combining poetry and unusual printing formats.”

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Our Words, Possessed by Fans

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In the driest language possible, I would say that fan fiction successfully undermines the traditional American heteronormative dynamic in ways that can’t be undone. In wetter language, fan fiction sexualizes. It’s transgressive because it suggests the possibility of the erotic. It’s political, because it complicates power structures.

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Sandra beasley

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Sandra Beasley

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Sandra Beasley about her new book Count the Waves, sestinas, and how actions can serve as signposts in the time stream. ...more

A Poet Ahead of His Time

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Stephen Crane, who died at age 28 from tuberculosis in June 1900, is remembered more for his fiction, such as The Red Badge of Courage, than his poetry. But perhaps, argues Jynne Dilling Marton, this should not be the case:

These poems are Biblical parables for a secular age: instructions for how to press through what we may feel is a lonely, barren desert of a life with clear eyes, dignity and a sense of humor.

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