Posts Tagged: poetry

The Witch Hunt

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In this interview we talk about—well, Juliet especially comes correct about mental health and poetry and honesty and life in West Virginia and why she writes and how terrifying her trailers were for the book and teaching while being bad as fuck and living & surviving trauma and physical attacks and about living without the shell, without the mirrored glasses and mirrored shield and without the lies.

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Poetry Inspires Kids to Change the World

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To do spoken word, you need bodies, you need people, you need that sense of gathering.

Poets have always tapped into an unspoken understanding that language can tap into the ways in which the world works. Over at the Huffington Post, Daveed Digs and Danez Smith discuss how poetry equips children with a sense of voice that inspires them to be more engaged with the world around them.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Janine Joseph

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The day the manuscript became Driving without a License was the day I said “yes” to the truth of my own life and coming-of-age experience as an undocumented immigrant. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Cristina García and Truong Tran

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How do you work with a material that you don’t have trust in? I had to step away from it and find another way of articulating and I had to do it without words. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Raphael Cormack

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Raphael Cormack discusses The Book of Khartoum: A City in Short Fiction, a collection of short stories he co-edited and translated, the editorial process, and the responsibilities that accompany translating writing. ...more

Crossroads

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In a new poem titled “@ the Crossroads: A Sudden American Poem,” US poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera reacts to last week’s violence by asking the reader to consider the men who were killed, their names, their faces, “the stories they often spoke.”

Herrera previously responded to a shooting at UCLA, his alma mater, with a poem, and has discussed the influence of social justice movements on his work in the past. 

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Podcatcher #3: Poetry Jawns

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Emma Sanders and Alina Pleskova charm us with their affection for each other, DIY ethos, and belief on Poetry Jawns, what matters is the work. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Keith Newton

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What’s interesting, of course, is how modern life could easily be seen in the opposite way—as an ever-expanding domain of individuality and self-expression. ...more

Jonterri Gadson

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Jonterri Gadson

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Jonterri Gadson about Blues Triumphant, her love of editing, and the intersection of poetry and comedy. ...more

The Hope Whose Death It Announces

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Poetry is defined by a failure to live up to the hype it generates, promising divine transcendence through a medium that is essentially human. This is the paradox Ben Lerner articulates in his dissertation on The Hatred of Poetry. At The New Republic, Ken Chen doesn’t buy it:

You get the sense Lerner’s intellectualized peevishness about poetry is simply an elaborate defense, one that distances an author from the shame, discomfort, and vulnerability that comes from experiencing one’s own emotions.

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The Evolution of Adrienne Rich

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Over at the New Yorker, Dan Chiasson marks the publication of Adrienne Rich’s collected works with an examination of the incredible arc of her life and career. And instead of condemning her many transformations as a kind of flightiness, he reminds us how admirable it is for a person to be able to change as they learn and grow:

Perhaps no American poet who started in the mode of accommodation so abruptly broke ranks, inventing for herself a new kind of discipline whose ethical rigors demanded fresh forms.

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Art Imitating (Imaginary) Life

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Rubens Ghenov’s solo exhibit at the Morgan Lehman Gallery, Accoutrements in Marwa, an Interlude in Silver, has an interesting source of inspiration:

For the past four years, Ghenov’s paintings have been inspired by the unpublished philosophical texts and verse of the late Spanish poet Angelico Morandá.

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Much Dying to Do

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Jenna Le reviews Vi Khi Nao’s new book of poetry, The Old Philosopher. While calling it “experimental” poetry, Le claims that Nao’s works are “readable,” with an “informal voice,” unlike much experimental poetry:

There is a worldly, cosmopolitan sensibility at work here: in their use of line, image, and irony, Nao’s poems are reminiscent of modernist French poets like Laforgue and Apollinaire.

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The Rumpus Interview with Danniel Schoonebeek

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Danniel Schoonebeek discusses living a quiet life in the Catskills, the importance of travel, partying in the woods with poets, and how capitalism forces people to be cruel to each other. ...more

These Are My Confessions

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Many poets—male poets especially—are secretly anxious that someone will call their poetry a frivolous, feminine pursuit. And instead of embracing the potential charge of frivolity—allowing themselves to be free of it or even to toy with it—those same poets draw lines in the sand with real-and-serious-capital-P-Poetry on one side, and lesser, feminized poetry on the other.

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The Rumpus Interview with Brian Blanchfield

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Poet and writer Brian Blanchfield talks about his essay collection Proxies, touring in support of a prose collection versus a poetry collection, and frottage. ...more