Posts Tagged: poetry

color-at-the-mercy-feature

Color at the Mercy of the Light

By

What if I said: while people still believe they are white in America, that delusion, and the dream upon which it is founded, needs to be seriously examined. ...more

David Nagler - Musician

Swinging Modern Sounds #76: American Songbag

By

In the broadest sense, I think of this work as being about the stuff of life: excitement, love, disappointment, pride, nature, cities, war, loneliness, work, class distinction, communication. ...more

jerichoparms_photo

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jericho Parms

By

What is lost still has substance, is malleable, can take on new impressions, and be molded again to our experience, often resulting in the most lasting force that determines how we see the world. ...more

janice-harrington

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Janice N. Harrington

By

Janice N. Harrington on her new collection Primitive and critiquing the use of "primitive" to describe African American folk art. ...more

A Terrible Question with No Satisfactory Answer

By

For better or worse, poetry is now the only thing he likes to do. Even with the crying and the hopeless odds.

Over at The Point, O.T. Marod writes about the crippling existential despair inherent in the question, “How should a poet make money?”—and a certain poet’s journey in a 2002 Toyota Camry inching along in Chicago traffic (towards?/away?/in the general vicinity of?/not even close to?) an answer.

...more

Tommy Pico

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Tommy Pico

By

The more of us there are out here sharing our work and telling our own stories and flying our freak flags, being our intricate, strange, and idiosyncratic selves, the less power the monolith has. ...more

porter-max-lucy-dickens-1300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Max Porter

By

Max Porter discusses his debut novel, Grief is the Thing with Feathers, literary genres, and the changing roles of editors. ...more

ROF April 1968 feature

Rumpus Original Fiction: April, 1968

By

Used to see lots of psychedelic princes and princesses on Haight Street. Not many these days. But here were hundreds of the turned on and tuned in, dressed like birds and peacocks in heat. ...more

monicasok-1300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Monica Sok

By

Monica Sok discusses her award-winning poetry chapbook Year Zero, her interest in Southeast Asian history, and living in isolation. ...more

Feminist Feast

By

Sixteen feminist poetry collections, old and new, showcased at Bustle, prove just how rich, diverse, and actionable poetry can be. Author C. CE Miller says, “As feminist icons like Elizabeth Warren and the notorious RBG have recently taught us (thanks, Twitter), there’s nothing like a good one-liner to really rile up the patriarchy.” Highlights include The Essential Gwendolyn Brooks, Morgan Parker’s There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé, The Distance of a Shout, by Kishwar Neheed, and Yin, by Carolyn Kizer.

...more

Poems for Airports

By

In his relatable poem in Hunger Mountain, “Observations at the Security Checkpoint,” Joel Brouwer gently explores traveling life under our TSA overlords:

Now our gestures
grow both more hurried and more delicate,
we stand on one foot to remove a boot,
take off our hats and jackets, as if for
sex or prayer, exposing ourselves to
each other and the officers, the officers
our lovers and our prophets both.

...more

A Death Blow Can Be a Life Blow to Some

By

What does it mean to be carried away? To be captured, carried off, liberated? To lose control of oneself? Lerner doesn’t show concern for questions like these. More generally, The Hatred of Poetry takes little interest in the rarities of technique across a poet’s body of work and avoids questions about his or her sense of history.

...more

Michael Helm

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Michael Helm

By

The Rumpus Book Club chats with Michael Helm about his new novel After James, the line between paranoia and caution, and the use of poetry as a plot device. ...more

Ritvo-BW-Headshot-300x300

The Rumpus Interview with Max Ritvo

By

Max Ritvo passed away on August 23, 2016. Earlier this summer, he spoke with Sarah Blake about his debut collection Four Reincarnations, writing with and about cancer, and how language is a game. ...more

Fear and Loathing

By

For Lambda Literary, Christopher Soto talks with Brenda Shaughnessy about her new collection of poetry and how she relates to her writing as someone who is already four collections in. She outlines the ways in which her work has been shaped by embarrassment, her experiences within the queer community, and the importance of a writer unselfconsciously leaving herself open to new things:

But I found that I could use my embarrassment against itself: a new kind of fuck-you to an inner critic I hadn’t realized I’d been listening to my whole life.

...more