Posts Tagged: poetry

14 Possibilities of Native Poetry

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Natalie Diaz, Featured Guest Editor for the January edition of Connotation Press, has curated a portfolio titled “14 Possibilities of Native Poetry.” In her introduction she poses the question, What is Native poetry?, and then responds:

What is Native poetry means there can be infinite possibilities, infinite poets and their infinite poems who might be an answer.

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Letter to Jim

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Many days I couldn’t see the way forward, but I kept going, the way you had. It was you, after all, who taught me how to stay. ...more

Poem of the Day: “An American Poem” by Eileen Myles

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Eileen Myles has been a badass writer for a while now; she tears down what needs be torn down, unapologetically, and fosters a communal feeling, inspiring others to do the same. During the time this poem was published in Not Me, Myles famously ran for president in a write-in campaign—and for many, Maggie Nelson among them, Myles is absolutely our president.

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The Rumpus Interview with Stacy Szymaszek

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Poet Stacy Szymaszek discusses her most recent collection, Journal of Ugly Sites & Other Journals, the "notebook genre," and claiming a city—ugly sites and all. ...more

Poem of the Day: “At Night the States” by Alice Notley

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“At Night the States” is a famous poem that, whether you have or haven’t heard it before, strikes you over the head repeatedly. Formally inventive without any loss in the depth of its feeling, Notley transcends the genre of elegy to an expression of grief that might register unmediated: it is a present poem, an immediate poem, an inconsolable poem.

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Of Poetry and Protest and Monticello In Mind

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Barbara Berman reviews Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmitt Till to Trayvon Martin and Monticello In Mind: Fifty Contemporary Poems on Jefferson today in Rumpus Poetry. ...more

This Week in Books: Licorice Candies

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate. ...more

Poem of the Day: “What Kind of Times Are These” by Adrienne Rich

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This year saw Adrienne Rich’s poems released into a collected edition by Norton, and some really great new articles written about her. Though she passed away in 2012, it’s safe to say that she remains a presence, will always remain a presence, in American writing.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 7): “Facing It”

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There should be no forgetting, much less forgiveness, of what happened during the Vietnam War. ...more

This Week in Books: The Red Hijab

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Welcome to This Week in Books, a new Rumpus column that will highlight books just released by small and independent presses.

Books are more important than ever. As we head into a Trump presidency, we’re seeing attacks on basic constitutional rights, increased hate crimes, and denial of accepted science.

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The Rumpus Interview with Vi Khi Nao

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Vi Khi Nao on her new novel Fish in Exile, why women shouldn't apologize (even when they're wrong), moving between genres, and why humor is vital in a novel full of darkness and grief. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Gregory Pardlo

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Poet and Pulitzer Prize winner Gregory Pardlo discusses the reverence for poetry found in other cultures, how he strings a book together, and the future of American poetry in light of our national crisis. ...more

Barbara Berman’s 2016 Holiday Poetry Shout-Out

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Barbara Berman offers suggestions for your poetry and poetics holiday gift-giving needs. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Rumpus Essay, Casandra Lopez threads together the fragments of self-identity, the love of cars her father and brother were born with, and a lost soul. Through the retelling of the death of her younger brother, Lopez explores the lasting wounds it caused for her and for her family, and how it feels to be related to the dead—it’s a brokenness that requires years of care and love—much like a beat-up car—to heal.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Shane McCrae

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I think that the moment we’re living in offers the best opportunity we’ve had in a long time in that a lot of things having to do with identity politics are being talked about in poems. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Alice Mattison

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Alice Mattison discusses her newest book, The Kite and the String, a meditation on her lifelong journey through the craft of writing, the joys of teaching writing, and the importance of community. ...more