Posts Tagged: poetry

I’m Emily Dickinson! Who Are You?

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For her “The Poems (We Think) We Know” column at the Los Angeles Review of Books, Alexandra Socarides writes about Emily Dickinson’s celebrated “I’m Nobody! Who are you?,” debunking its commonly held interpretation:

There is a seemingly stark private/public dichotomy laid out by the poem’s two stanza structure.

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Somebody Who Has Found the Words

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Recently in the UK, poetry seems to have found its way back into mainstream culture, which of course elicits the question: did it ever leave? Over at Newsweek, Howard Swains examines the reasons we return to poetry even in an age when words like “distraction” and “multimedia” tend to hijack any dicsussion of art or literature:

“In some ways it’s that question of whether poetry is dying that keeps poetry alive,” Chris McCabe, a poet and librarian at the Saison Poetry Library at Southbank Centre in London, says.

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Self Portrait by Billy Burgos

Where I Write #27: A Small Bench Between Two 25 Story Buildings

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I was doing clerical work for a magazine publisher in a high-rise along the Wilshire corridor and each day I would take my one hour lunch on a small bench between two 25 story buildings. The proximity of all these tall structures created a vortex of wind that constantly combed through all these magnificent trees. One by one I had to know and then write about each individual Jacaranda, Magnolia and Floss Silk tree.

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The Poetry Archive Anew

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Poetryarchive.org, the online poetry resource founded by retired British poet laureate Andrew Motion and the recording producer Richard Carrington a decade ago, has just been relaunched. In the GuardianMotion talks about the origins of the website and it new redesign:

Our original intention was to combine three things: pleasure for the general reader/listener, by bringing together existing recordings of “historic” poets with new recordings of contemporaries that we would make or commission ourselves; help for students of all ages and their teachers, by combining these recordings with introductions, brief biographies, lesson plans, a glossary of terms, and all sorts of other educational bells and whistles; a safe haven for poet’s voices, which would mean their voices were not lost to posterity.

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