Posts Tagged: poetry

Somebody Who Has Found the Words

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Recently in the UK, poetry seems to have found its way back into mainstream culture, which of course elicits the question: did it ever leave? Over at Newsweek, Howard Swains examines the reasons we return to poetry even in an age when words like “distraction” and “multimedia” tend to hijack any dicsussion of art or literature:

“In some ways it’s that question of whether poetry is dying that keeps poetry alive,” Chris McCabe, a poet and librarian at the Saison Poetry Library at Southbank Centre in London, says.

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Self Portrait by Billy Burgos

Where I Write #27: A Small Bench Between Two 25 Story Buildings

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I was doing clerical work for a magazine publisher in a high-rise along the Wilshire corridor and each day I would take my one hour lunch on a small bench between two 25 story buildings. The proximity of all these tall structures created a vortex of wind that constantly combed through all these magnificent trees. One by one I had to know and then write about each individual Jacaranda, Magnolia and Floss Silk tree.

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The Poetry Archive Anew

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Poetryarchive.org, the online poetry resource founded by retired British poet laureate Andrew Motion and the recording producer Richard Carrington a decade ago, has just been relaunched. In the GuardianMotion talks about the origins of the website and it new redesign:

Our original intention was to combine three things: pleasure for the general reader/listener, by bringing together existing recordings of “historic” poets with new recordings of contemporaries that we would make or commission ourselves; help for students of all ages and their teachers, by combining these recordings with introductions, brief biographies, lesson plans, a glossary of terms, and all sorts of other educational bells and whistles; a safe haven for poet’s voices, which would mean their voices were not lost to posterity.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Cliches are something every writer has to deal with at some point. This weekend, Steve Edwards acknowledges the cliché and comes to something of a reckoning. Edwards declares:

That’s how the heart works—it doesn’t give a shit about what it’s supposed to feel, it just feels.

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Lightning and Lawn Debris

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No spoilers here, but Patricia Lockwood’s new poetry collection Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals is garnering significant praise. In the New York Times, Dwight Garner writes that:

Patricia Lockwood’s sexy, surreal and mostly sublime poems seem to have been, as James Joyce said in “Ulysses” about a batch of folk tales, “printed by the weird sisters in the year of the big wind.” They scatter lightning and lawn debris across your psyche.

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Remembering the Blue and the Gray

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Memorial Day is a time of both national reflection and diverse local tradition. In a piece connecting poetry and community storytelling, The Atlantic offers some literary history in observance of this past weekend’s holiday. Two years after the end of the Civil War, the magazine published Francis Miles Finch’s conciliatory poem, ”The Blue and The Gray.” Finch, a northerner, was inspired to write the piece by four women in Columbus, Mississippi, who decorated the graves of deceased Confederates and Union soldiers alike in a gesture of nonpartisan respect. Today, students in Columbus honor the event by retelling the life stories of those buried in that cemetery.

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In Defense of Twitter Poetry

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Twitter is like a digital notebook for collecting observations, Rhys Nixon describes over at Entropy, making it an ideal platform for poetry and expression. Twitter also combines humor and absurdism, two elements often overlooked in more conventional literature. But perhaps the most significant characteristic of Twitter is the collaborative process essential to all creative forms.

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