Posts Tagged: privilege

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #104: sam sax

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I could write a bullet list of sam’s sax’s recent accomplishments, but the wiser thing would be to advise you to pick up his newly released book MADNESS. ...more

Basura

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[T]erms like "white trash" and basura most accurately reveal those who are doing the defining. Consider what we throw away, and why. Look at what we throw away. Think about the reasons why. ...more

The Myth of White Male Rage: Jared Yates Sexton’s The People Will Rise

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[I]n a book that argues we are divided and stuck in our own echo chambers, Sexton’s own divide goes unexamined, his own echo chamber unchallenged. ...more

The Election and the Ash Borer

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Does it matter what words a sign says when a symbol says so much more? A white X. A carved swastika. Things get torn down from less. ...more

The Summer of Lana Del Rey

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Three summers ago, I did nothing but drive around Middlebury, Vermont, blasting Lana Del Rey and chain-smoking cigarettes. It was—and I will be dramatic, because that is how it felt—an act of survival. That summer I was in an academic program where we were only allowed to speak or be spoken to in French.

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Blur, Cross, Pulverize, Confront, Remember: Talking with James Allen Hall

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James Allen Hall on I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, unmaking boundaries, and book titles. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy. ...more

Are You a Trans Ally?

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Often well-intentioned cis folks like myself feel kind of overwhelmed by all there is to know and, not wanting to sound ignorant or hurtful, just kind of keep to the sidelines. But it doesn’t take a degree in gender studies to be a trans ally (nor does it require you to have an LGBTQ friend).

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Wealth and the American Dream

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Two recent novels, The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney and Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty by Ramona Ausubel, explore privilege and entitlement, and what happens when wealth disappears. It can be hard to feel sorry for trust fund kids when you live paycheck to paycheck, but:

From some distance, it’s a parable about the current age, in which an increasingly fraught vision of American prosperity abuts the realities of stagnation and loss.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Solmaz Sharif

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Solmaz Sharif discusses her new collection Look, the difference between nearness and similarity, and the level of ownership we have over stories. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

Used-Car Salesman

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I wondered if he understood my joke, or its evasion, but surely he knew a used-car salesman always fudged his story. In fact, the car had been in my possession all of three weeks. Also, it didn’t exactly belong to me. ...more

Rich Enough That I Don’t Have to Tell ‘Em That I’m Rich

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Since its publication twenty years ago, Frances Mayes’s memoir Under the Tuscan Sun has transformed its namesake Italian setting into a sort of synonym for a wealthy lifestyle. Travel writer Jason Wilson revisited the work only to discover exactly the charms it so frustratingly popularized:

However I feel about Mayes and her privilege, and the marketing phenomenon that has flourished in her wake, there’s no denying that her prose brings Bramasole to life.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

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With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw. ...more

Female Friendships and Online Literary Sexism

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As an essayist who often writes from personal experience and who’s working on a memoir, I believe deeply it is a feminist act for women to tell their stories. ...more

The Complicated “Riches” Of America

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In a nuanced essay at Vela Magazine, Anne P. Beatty discusses what her experiences teaching for the Peace Corps in Nepal and teaching at an impoverished school in LA taught her about privilege and about America:

Nepal seemed full of life and community and hope and culture, whereas America was lonely and sterile, devoid of sounds or smells.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Making a Murderer and “Bad” Families

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There were “good” families and “bad” families, and even I, an outsider, was quickly apprised of which was which. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

A Brief History of Pandering

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Erasing women writers like Woolson carries immense implications. It creates an environment ripe for the continued marginalization and silencing of women’s voices today. ...more

Lauren Groff Talks Fates & Furies

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In a lot of senses, this book is as much a critique of the novel as it is a novel. It’s about the assumptions we have about who gets to create, and what has been created, and how stories get told… People have charged me with misandry, which is crazy because I truly, deeply love men… But of course this is a feminist novel, because a feminist is just someone who recognizes power structures that keep people from having the fullest life they can.

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