Posts Tagged: privilege

Solmaz Sharif

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Solmaz Sharif

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Solmaz Sharif discusses her new collection Look, the difference between nearness and similarity, and the level of ownership we have over stories. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away. ...more

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Used-Car Salesman

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I wondered if he understood my joke, or its evasion, but surely he knew a used-car salesman always fudged his story. In fact, the car had been in my possession all of three weeks. Also, it didn’t exactly belong to me. ...more

Rich Enough That I Don’t Have to Tell ‘Em That I’m Rich

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Since its publication twenty years ago, Frances Mayes’s memoir Under the Tuscan Sun has transformed its namesake Italian setting into a sort of synonym for a wealthy lifestyle. Travel writer Jason Wilson revisited the work only to discover exactly the charms it so frustratingly popularized:

However I feel about Mayes and her privilege, and the marketing phenomenon that has flourished in her wake, there’s no denying that her prose brings Bramasole to life.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

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With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw. ...more

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Female Friendships and Online Literary Sexism

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As an essayist who often writes from personal experience and who’s working on a memoir, I believe deeply it is a feminist act for women to tell their stories. ...more

The Complicated “Riches” Of America

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In a nuanced essay at Vela Magazine, Anne P. Beatty discusses what her experiences teaching for the Peace Corps in Nepal and teaching at an impoverished school in LA taught her about privilege and about America:

Nepal seemed full of life and community and hope and culture, whereas America was lonely and sterile, devoid of sounds or smells.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Making a Murderer and “Bad” Families

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There were “good” families and “bad” families, and even I, an outsider, was quickly apprised of which was which. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

Constance Fenimore Woolson

A Brief History of Pandering

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Erasing women writers like Woolson carries immense implications. It creates an environment ripe for the continued marginalization and silencing of women’s voices today. ...more

Lauren Groff Talks Fates & Furies

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In a lot of senses, this book is as much a critique of the novel as it is a novel. It’s about the assumptions we have about who gets to create, and what has been created, and how stories get told… People have charged me with misandry, which is crazy because I truly, deeply love men… But of course this is a feminist novel, because a feminist is just someone who recognizes power structures that keep people from having the fullest life they can.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Tamara Winfrey-Harris

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The reality is that there is privilege even within social justice movements. ...more

Check Your Magic

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Muggle-born students of Hogwarts are an underprivileged class, while magic-born students enjoy unquantified privilege, argues Sarah Seltzer over at Flavorwire. Rowling creates a world where privilege and power are coupled together, just as wealth and race have allowed certain classes greater access to power in the real world:

Rowling isn’t arguing that a wand is directly comparable to a tennis racket but instead making the point that magic (like certain kinds of privilege) is a form of power, one that can be used for both evil and good.

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“Racial Neutrality” Is A Myth

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“I am calling bullshit on the fact that the same people that are stretching red tape across bureaucratic processes such as child-support modifications, and family reunification, and section 8 vouchers, and long-term affordable housing, and health-care benefits, and expungements are the same people that are drawing white chalk marks around young black bodies.

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