Posts Tagged: proust

The House of Fiction Has Many Rooms: Talking with Sigrid Nunez

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Sigrid Nunez discusses her seventh novel, The Friend, her fondness for writing about animals, and the ways the literary world has changed.

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Language Is All Convention: Talking with Elif Batuman

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Elif Batuman discusses her new novel The Idiot, what it means to be a writer, and the artifice of language.

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #30: Walk On

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This Tuesday was, by no means, a good news day. The night before was the tragedy in Manchester, England, at which a suicide bomber killed children at a pop concert. But, sad as it is, that is not the story that moved me, on this beautiful Tuesday, to tears. I care, but at this point […]

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(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: Claire Rudy Foster

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It is about the essential parts of story. The bones. The steel rods and rings. The skin that goes white with tension. Tolerating that kind of discomfort takes practice, yes, but it is exhilarating.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #72: Laurie Sheck

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Laurie Sheck is the author, most recently, of Island of the Mad, and A Monster’s Notes, a re-imagining of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. A Pulitzer Prize finalist in poetry for The Willow Grove, she has been a Guggenheim Fellow, as well as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard, and at the […]

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(K)ink: Writing While Deviant: E. A. Longfellow

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The way I think about my writing is similar to the way I think about my kink—both have to do with history and the ethics around appropriation.

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The Rumpus Interview with Gregory Pardlo

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Poet and Pulitzer Prize winner Gregory Pardlo discusses the reverence for poetry found in other cultures, how he strings a book together, and the future of American poetry in light of our national crisis.

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Coming Home to Proust

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At The Millions, J.P. Smith describes the singular effect that Marcel Proust has had on his growth as a writer: This isn’t a rambling, stream-of-consciousness book of memories lost and found; it’s a novel with a subtle and solid architecture, where in its last volume, Time Regained, the shape of the work comes finally into focus.

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Tell Me about Yourself

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Do you love this shit? Are you high right now? Do you ever get nervous? Quizzes are everywhere these days, from meandering author interviews to hard-hitting investigations to exactly which Disney princess corresponds to your introverted spirit animal. Read about the now-ubiquitous model’s Proustian origins over at the New Yorker.

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Reading Mademoiselle Gantrel

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We squinted into the smoky room and saw ourselves on junior year abroad, frolicking on the Left Bank with artists in berets like hers.

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The Rumpus Interview with Keith Lee Morris

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Keith Lee Morris discusses his latest book Traveler’s Rest, Lewis and Clark, and how writing a novel about dreams requires much more than sleep.

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The Rumpus Interview with Garth Greenwell

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Garth Greenwell discusses his debut novel, What Belongs to You, crossing boundaries, language as defense, and the queer tradition of novel writing that blurs boundaries between fiction and essay and autobiography.

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My Evenings Reading Alone

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For nearly ten years I had lain beside him: the snoring was a blow, but, looking back, it was also a necessary portent, an etch in our story, the fuzzy spot on a picture frame you can’t tell is from the photograph aging or a fingerprint that left its caressing mark on the glass.

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The Joy of Knausgaard

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For Flavorwire, Jonathon Sturgeon works to define “contemporary” literature and wonders where Karl Knausgaard’s My Struggle fits into the mix. What he ultimately argues is that contemporary literature is often “project based,” and that Knausgaard’s self-exploratory novel is the most definitive example of this kind of work in recent times: Not only does the title My Struggle claim for Knausgaard the […]

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What Dreams May Come

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In a culture where everything is assigned a market value, imagination isn’t in high demand. Over at The Millions, Chloe Benjamin wonders why some of imagination’s most vivid manifestations—dreams and fiction—fall so low on our priority list: But in the absence of conclusive evidence, sleep’s utility—like that of fiction—is still in doubt. How much, in […]

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“Ginger Is Good For Taking Care of Yourself”

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“It feels like cheating,” Larissa Pham says in a Gawker essay titled “In My Shopping Cart,” “to write about culture by writing about food.” But it reads like anything but cheating. Pham wheels us through the grocery aisles of her memory, pointing out the Vietnamese food her family made with American ingredients, childhood treats with […]

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BAKED MEMORIES

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Proust left out one important detail: the recipe. And no one ever asked him for it. We all know the famous passage of Marcel Proust’s “Remembrance of Things Past” in which the author’s mind flies back to childhood after tasting a madeleine dipped in warm tea. What we don’t know is: how exactly was a […]

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