Posts Tagged: science fiction

The Mirror’s Shards

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In the face of colossal and destructive political lies, we need a more nuanced understanding of the world than simply truth versus lie. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Well, it’s been one week under the Trump administration, and already we are living in a land of “alternative facts.” After Kellyanne Conway used the term to defend Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s falsehoods regarding the inauguration crowd size on Sunday, the American people were, understandably, reminded of George Orwell’s 1984, and sales of the book skyrocketed to #1 on the bestseller list by Tuesday night.

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The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus interview with Jeremy P. Bushnell

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Jeremy P. Bushnell discusses his new novel, The Insides, themes of consent, and designing a post-apocalyptic board game. ...more

Damned and Damaged Vessels

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I envisioned a new science fiction canon, one in which I was a cyborg, fashioning my body into something new. ...more

Weekly Geekery

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Is HBO’s bookish Westworld poised to give science fiction the Game of Thrones treatment?

Antelopes, Bollywood, climate change, Brönte.

National Geographic‘s autumn book recommendations—sushi, hiking, murder, oh my!

Elon Musk name-drops Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

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Like Tears in Rain

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In a universe slowly sinking into entropy, writing can take the disordered pieces of our experience and fit their edges together into something organized. If the work of a writer is to tease out meaning from the tangled mess of life, many of these algorithms essentially do the opposite, taking meaningful human posts or experiences and reducing them to their barest reportable facts.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Michael Helm

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Michael Helm about his new novel After James, the line between paranoia and caution, and the use of poetry as a plot device. ...more

Defining Writing

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For JSTOR Daily, Chi Luu examines the long-conflicting ideas of whether writing is a form of technology or a separate dialect of its spoken form. Luu references the upcoming film Arrival and the sci-fi novella it’s based on, Ted Chiang’s The Story of Your Life, which takes a linguist’s point of view in telling its story of a human-alien first encounter.

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Imagining A Dystopian Olympic Games

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At the Huffington Post, Maddie Crum and Maxwell Strachan ask 7 science fiction authors to hypothesize about what a dystopian Olympics might look like. While most of the authors acknowledge the influence that climate change and technology will have on the Olympics, Crum and Strachan note that the authors’ responses are surprisingly optimistic.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Jaquira Díaz

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Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

Carving the Uncanny Valley

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Any Luddite with half a brain has already begun stockpiling nonperishables for the inevitable moment the robots rise up against us. Over at the Ploughshares blog, Joelle Renstrom recounts how writers were awakened to the threat of artificial intelligence:

A certain likeness to humans inspires kinship, but when the line blurs, that kinship turns to fear.

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Anti-Blackness in Sci-Fi Publishing

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Less than two percent of science fiction stories published in 2015 were by black writers. And a recent study found that black speculative fiction writers face “universal” racism—more damning evidence demonstrating the institutionalized racism in book publishing, and the importance of introducing more diversity at every level of the process.

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