Quantcast

Posts Tagged: science fiction

How Accurate Is Chang-Rae Lee’s New Novel?

By

Perhaps American sci-fi is made to tell immigrant stories. And maybe there’s a reason why, during a 24-hour travel back to Taipei, I felt welcomed home by the collective voice of B-more.

Kevin Tang’s review of Chang-rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea for BuzzFeed Books brings to bear his experience growing up in late-’80s Taiwan, where, despite austere living conditions and endless work hours, “we were content, and didn’t know how to protest.”

Tang seems like the perfect person to illuminate Lee’s novel about a grossly unequal futuristic America’s division between the individual and the collective.

...more

Buy Robert Heinlein’s Bed

By

“How would you like to own Heinlein’s ‘second-best bed’?” asks this eBay listing, which is apparently legitimate.

The bed was designed and built by the sci-fi writer himself, who built all kinds of nifty conveniences into it, including “a drawer, a pull out writing surface, and shelf space, as well as”—buyer beware—”a compartment suitable for a box of tissues, and a trash compartment with a removable container.”

Local pickup in Long Beach!

...more

Women-Only Worlds in Science Fiction

By

At the BBC, writer Sarah Hall explores “the popular motif in science fiction of an all-women society surviving without men.” In the two-part program, Hall talks with authors, professors, and science fiction historians, looking at how science fiction “has been used to examine relationships between the sexes,” and how the genre “has examined the different ways of continuing the human race.”

(Via Bookslut)

...more

Manufacturing Reality

By

“But if we are going to manufacture our reality, couldn’t we make it a bit better? The thing we seem to like manufacturing the best are enemies, and here we are all guilty. Al-Qaida manufactured a vision of the west dominated by Satan, and the west has manufactured a simplistic vision of the Islamic world to direct its anger at in response.”

Applauding science fiction’s ability to remind us of the constructed nature of reality, this Guardian article references Lavie Tidhar’s new novel, Osama, as a key example of the genre’s political possibilities.

...more

The Unsettling Visions Of Thomas Disch

By

“Fantasy is not avoidable. The very act of writing fiction is a sin, a lie. One of Disch’s most haunting stories, ‘Getting Into Death,’ is about a writer (one who uses two pseudonyms, at least one of which Disch used himself) who orchestrates her death by fabricating warmth and sentiment toward everyone she has ever known, creating a surfeit of charmingly mawkish moments.

...more

Staging A Beautiful Apocalypse

By

Today is the birthday of one of my very favorite living writers, Samuel R. Delany.

(I spoke once here before about how I share with Junot Diaz an abiding love for Delany’s work.)

All it took for him to become my favorite was to read his legendary, mind-boggling and notorious sci-fi apocalyptic epic Dhalgren a few years back when I was living in an old Edwardian in the Sunset District of San Francisco and working for lawyers in the Lake Merritt District of Oakland.

...more

Science Fiction Predicts The Present

By

“Science fiction writers don’t predict the future (except accidentally), but if they’re very good, they may manage to predict the present.

Mary Shelley wasn’t worried about reanimated corpses stalking Europe, but by casting a technological innovation in the starring role of Frankenstein, she was able to tap into present-day fears about technology overpowering its masters and the hubris of the inventor.

...more

Africa and Science Fiction

By

Nnedi Okorafor has an essay over at The Nebula Awards site about Africa’s relationship with science fiction, as well as a discussion on Penguin’s decision to make science fiction ineligible for The Penguin Prize for African Writing.

“As (director Tchidi) Chikere said, African audiences don’t feel that science fiction is really concerned with what’s real, what’s present….

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

This week, the book blogs are scaring the ever-loving Jesus out of me.

Sure, there have been a few fun, interesting updates and interviews, but most of what they’ve been saying makes me want to build a series of tunnels in and around my house so that I can start planning the first push of the resistance.

...more