Posts Tagged: science fiction

Swinging Modern Sounds #84: Music for Spaceships

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Perhaps space is an inevitable resting place for music of this kind, because time is completely different when conceived of in the vastness of space, and not only because of relativity. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Brooke C. Obie

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Brooke C. Obie discusses the historical basis for her debut novel, Book of Addis, writing to dismantle white supremacy, and why Black speculative fiction is integral to her survival. ...more

Between Autonomy and Powerlessness: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

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Women’s bodies signify so much, both to ourselves and others, that inhabiting them and having ownership over them often feel like two different states of being. ...more

Magical Systems and Fusion Reactors: Rivers Solomon Discusses An Unkindness of Ghosts

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Rivers Solomon discusses her debut novel, the importance of writing the body into a story, and more. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #81: Chanelle Benz

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Chanelle Benz’s debut collection, The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead, is filled with characters often facing a moral crossroads. The stories contain the unexpected, like a classic Western complete with local brothel as well as a gothic tale.

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Breaking the Binaries: A Conversation with Lidia Yuknavitch

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Lidia Yuknavitch discusses her new novel, Book of Joan, a reimagining of the Joan of Arc story set in a terrifying future where the heroine has emerged to save a world ravaged by war, violence, and greed. ...more

The Mirror’s Shards

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In the face of colossal and destructive political lies, we need a more nuanced understanding of the world than simply truth versus lie. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Well, it’s been one week under the Trump administration, and already we are living in a land of “alternative facts.” After Kellyanne Conway used the term to defend Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s falsehoods regarding the inauguration crowd size on Sunday, the American people were, understandably, reminded of George Orwell’s 1984, and sales of the book skyrocketed to #1 on the bestseller list by Tuesday night.

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The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus interview with Jeremy P. Bushnell

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Jeremy P. Bushnell discusses his new novel, The Insides, themes of consent, and designing a post-apocalyptic board game. ...more

Damned and Damaged Vessels

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I envisioned a new science fiction canon, one in which I was a cyborg, fashioning my body into something new. ...more

Weekly Geekery

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Is HBO’s bookish Westworld poised to give science fiction the Game of Thrones treatment?

Antelopes, Bollywood, climate change, Brönte.

National Geographic‘s autumn book recommendations—sushi, hiking, murder, oh my!

Elon Musk name-drops Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

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Like Tears in Rain

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In a universe slowly sinking into entropy, writing can take the disordered pieces of our experience and fit their edges together into something organized. If the work of a writer is to tease out meaning from the tangled mess of life, many of these algorithms essentially do the opposite, taking meaningful human posts or experiences and reducing them to their barest reportable facts.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Michael Helm

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Michael Helm about his new novel After James, the line between paranoia and caution, and the use of poetry as a plot device. ...more

Defining Writing

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For JSTOR Daily, Chi Luu examines the long-conflicting ideas of whether writing is a form of technology or a separate dialect of its spoken form. Luu references the upcoming film Arrival and the sci-fi novella it’s based on, Ted Chiang’s The Story of Your Life, which takes a linguist’s point of view in telling its story of a human-alien first encounter.

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