Posts Tagged: Shirley Jackson

This Week in Short Fiction

By

The last few weeks have been all about celebrating female masters of the short story. Earlier this month, we saw collections by Clarice Lispector and Shirley Jackson making waves in the literary swimming pool, and this week Lucia Berlin enters with a cannon ball.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

This week, two underappreciated masters of the weird and uncanny are finally getting their due attention. That’s right, we’re talking about Clarice Lispector and Shirley Jackson, two literary powerhouses who wrote contemporaneously in different styles, different languages, even different hemispheres, but who have some striking similarities.

...more

Would You Rather Babysit Cathy Ames or Christine Hargensen?

By

What do Yukio Mishima, Tana French, Shirley Jackson, and John Steinbeck have in common?

They’re the masterminds behind a couple of the most evil fictional youngsters of all time, according to a list compiled by British bookstore Abebooks. The list shuns contemporary malevolent characters in favor of the “utterly evil” children of yore, reasoning: “While Draco, Augustus, Violet and Veruca may be distasteful, they are actually quite mild-mannered compared to some of the horrible children literature has to offer.”

...more

Bringing Up Baby

By

Shirley Jackson’s bone-chilling story “The Lottery” is probably the last thing anyone wants to associate with Mother’s Day, yet her lurking plot twists and sharp character insights are the perfect tools to write about parenting. In this month’s Slate Book Review, Dan Kois explains how Jackson’s books depicted family life well before any of us knew what to expect when expecting:

Airy unconcern about the state of one’s home, marriage, or children, masking a deeper unspoken acknowledgment that all will forever exist in a state of chaos?

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

It’s only February, but 2015 is already proving to be a treasure trove of big happenings in the world of short stories. Take this past Tuesday, when Kelly Link, Charles Baxter, and Neil Gaiman all released new collections, undoubtedly making the world a few orders of magnitude weirder, smarter, and spookier.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

In the latest “The Last Book I Loved,” S. Hope Mills tackles the thriller-esque 1959 novel, The Haunting of Hill House. Shirley Jackson’s talents are strong enough to spook even the avowedly un-spookable—that woman, Mills admits, “knew what it meant to be haunted.”

And Heather Partington reviews Maude Casey’s novel inspired by the true story of a 19th century man “afflicted by ‘traveling fuge,’ or dromomania.” The Man Who Walked Away is a careful analysis of the connection between language and memory, filtered through the lens of a truly unique doctor-patient relationship.

...more

Yeah Yeah Yeahs Release Surprisingly Literary Music Video

By

Regardless of your level of enamoration with indie-rock mainstays the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, if you’re a Rumpus reader, you’ll probably dig the video for their new single “Sacrilege.”

It unfolds like a short story, with a perfectly deployed reverse timeline and undertones of dark classics like Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery.”

Watch it—watch it twice!

...more

After 65 Years, “The Lottery” Endures

By

Since its publication in 1948, “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson has become an American classic, appearing in high school classrooms, as well as in the hands and on the computers of people around the nation.

On the 65th anniversary of the publication of “The Lottery,” Ruth Franklin at the New Yorker discusses the 300+ letters, most of them negative, that came pouring in—“the most mail [the New Yorker] had ever received in response to a work of fiction.”

Franklin details some of the angry and bewildered responses from readers, including some amongst the New Yorker’s staff.

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

It’s your humble Sunday guest editor back in the hot seat again for another wild ride through the bookblogosphere!

Today is special to me because the Folsom Fair will be happening which, if you’ve never been, is one of the most flagrant and life-affirming displays of leather, fetish and all around perversity to ever take place in the naked light of day.

...more