Posts Tagged: sports

Language Is Sensational: A Conversation with Eileen G’Sell

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Eileen G’Sell discusses her debut collection, Life After Rugby, how and why she chose her book’s title, and challenging gender categories.

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The Single Most Important Thing: Talking Sports and Writing with Sridhar Pappu

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Sridhar Pappu discusses his first book, The Year of the Pitcher, writing it over six years, and the roots of his baseball fandom.

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For Men and By Men

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Slate’s Rebecca Onion and Andrew Kahn analyze the overwhelming maleness of both the subjects and authors of history books, discussing their findings with book publishers: Our data set revealed some answers about the publishing of popular history that we expected: Authors are largely male, biographical subjects too; “uncle books” make up a third of the […]

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Pageantry and Water Sports

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I had come in search of the meaning of synchronized swimming in modern America. Over the course of a week, I had gotten bored with the human body’s physical excellence. Maybe that was because, despite the spectacle at this level, even flawlessness becomes mundane. Without the threat of failure, watching people perfectly execute the seemingly […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Thunder, Thighs

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Over one third of the women in my survey had been called “Thunder Thighs” at some point in their life. Many were still haunted by this. None of them interpreted “thunder” to mean “power.

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Writing for Sport

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What do writing and sports have in common? For The Millions, Tracy O’Neill suggests that both writers and athletes are in the “business” of constructing “narratives,” and likens the experience of writing fiction to the competitiveness of sports: It’s easy to fantasize about the published book or the championship victory, and it’s easy to believe that […]

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Steve Almond

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Steve Almond about his new book, Against Football, One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto, the complicity of fans in the violence of the NFL, the sports media’s role in the discussion (or lack of one) and the difficulty of leaving a sport you love.

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The Honesty of Aggression

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The continual references to my sex are striking. On the one hand, they stand in stark contrast to the identity-digging that I am attempting. On the other, they resonate: trying on aggression for size is foreign territory.

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A Die-Hard Fan’s Lament

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Rumpus columnist Steve Almond, an unwavering Oakland Raiders fan, writes for The New York Times about being a true sports fan, specifically a fan of a floundering team: “As I prepare to immerse myself in another season of ill-fated devotion, there is a question I can’t shake: Why? Not why do the Raiders keep losing, but why […]

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“Hard Times in the Uncanny Valley”

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Colson Whitehead went on a London Olympics adventure, which you can read all about in his multi-part dispatch for Grantland. “I started scoring events in terms of what they’d offer in a human-annihilation-type scenario. Offensewise, archery skills seemed like an obvious asset at first. But the archers’ high-tech bows wouldn’t survive a day of jumping […]

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In Defense of Lolo Jones

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Much controversy has been sparked over the recent media attention being bestowed on the American hurdler Lolo Jones. Jones, who placed fourth in this Olympics’ 100-meters hurdle competition, has been a figure of debate since the New York Times wrote an scathing article about her reliance on image to win endorsement deals and garner national […]

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We Can Be Heroes

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“Poems are made of words that live in bodies — bodies shaped by line breaks, and fixed forever in space, on the page. Picture a gymnast in relation to the trampoline, the invisible line between the two driven equally by unseen forces of gravity and the gymnast’s own strength. When a poem is read aloud, […]

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Olympic Poetics

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“It’s easy to say poets are attracted to sport for reasons that have something to do with form. I’m sure that’s true, but I also think that it has something to do with the possibility of failure and, in the case of many Olympic sports, the fact that nobody really watches what you do most […]

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