Quantcast

Posts Tagged: suicide

When Journalistic Ethics Aren’t So Ethical

By

In the course of writing a story about a golf club, a Grantland journalist named Caleb Hannan discovered that the club’s inventor was a transgender woman. She ended up committing suicide, which, though he doesn’t seem to realize it’s a possibility, could very well be the result of his outing her.

...more

Remembering David Foster Wallace

By

Five years ago today, groundbreaking writer David Foster Wallace took his own life.

Maria Popova at Brain Pickings remembers him with a post excerpting Conversations with David Foster Wallace, a “collection of 22 interviews and profiles of the beloved author.” A preview:

Really good work probably comes out of a willingness to disclose yourself, open yourself up in spiritual and emotional ways that risk making you look banal or melodramatic or naive or unhip or sappy, and to ask the reader really to feel something.

...more

Jumpers

By

“The Golden Gate Bridge was born a metaphor….The span would connect San Francisco with Marin County, engineering with nature, and the past with the future”—and, for a queasily high number of people, life with death.

For Guernica, Candace Opper looks at the history of the legendary bridge’s suicidal jumpers, including interviews with the people who, against all odds, survived the fall.

...more

silencetwo

What Music?

By

A dozen Decembers ago, my brother was found in his Bronco, burnt to shit. He had been out drinking with strangers—at least, that’s what the detective told us. The last words we know he said were, “Good night, new friends.”

...more

Staying Alive as a Poet, Artist, Etc.

By

“Sometimes it seems as though poets, in particular, move in an endangered artistic world. Think Sylvia Plath, John Berryman, Anne Sexton. And, last month, Rachel Wetzsteon, an accomplished poet who took her own life at age 42.”

Jacket Copy last week pondered the unfortunate tendency towards suicide, especially among poets, and why you are not allowed to kill yourself anymore.

...more

Letting Go By Making Stories: Philip Connors Tackles Suicide

By

In 1996, Phillip Connors’ brother unexpectedly committed suicide.  Now, over a decade later, Connors is getting closure through the completion of a 22,000 word account of his family’s experiences called “So Little to Remember”.

The piece, which tackles more than his family’s reactions to the suicide, began as a “thought experiment” put together by Connors to identify patterns in his brother’s life leading up to his unexpected death.  “So Little to Remember” also reminds us of the important differences between life and writing about life, as the author explains in his note to Maud Newton.  Ultimately, Connors feels his piece is independent from the events it is based on; a method of “letting go by making stories.”

“So Little to Remember” will be out in the latest issue of  n+1 magazine.  To tide you over, an excerpt is available  on Maud Newton’s blog.

...more