Posts Tagged: sylvia plath

It’s All Metaphorical: A Conversation with Laurette Folk

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Laurette Folk discusses her new collection, Totem Beasts, the role of meditation and dreams in her work, and "seeking some heightened experience in the conscious world." ...more

Chewing Rocks: A Conversation with David Biespiel

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David Biespiel discusses his new book, The Education of a Young Poet, being comfortable in uncertainty, and extending moments in writing. ...more

What to Read When Everyone Is Talking about Healthcare

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Here's a list of wonderful books that look at physical and mental health from many different perspectives. By the time we read through the entire list, maybe Congress will have come to their senses. ...more

#SuicideGirls: Why I Teach Sylvia Plath

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But let’s not forget: feminism is, at least in part, about choice, and portions of life are play, not politics. Play and relationships and creativity and whatever we want. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

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Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended. ...more

TORCH: My American Playground

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I left the car by the roadside and ran up the slope, in tears now, reaching the picnic tables and swings and, as bright and vivid as in my dreams, my purple-shaped climbing frame, exactly as I remembered it. ...more

Allowing a Female to Own Her Genius: Talking with Alana Massey

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Alana Massey discusses her debut collection, All the Lives I Want, the best piece of writing advice she's ever received, and acknowledging the work that women do. ...more

Blur, Cross, Pulverize, Confront, Remember: Talking with James Allen Hall

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James Allen Hall on I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, unmaking boundaries, and book titles. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, Canadian-British author Alison MacLeod mixes fiction with fact and memoir with metaphysics in a short story about a visit to Sylvia Plath’s grave. At Lit Hub, “Sylvia Wears Pink in the Underworld” takes what could otherwise be an item on a tourist’s agenda or an assignment in a ninth grade English class and transmutes it into a piece of writing that walks the edge of beauty and darkness as it pays homage to one of literature’s most mysterious and tragic celebrities.

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Written in Chalk: What It Means to Be Crazy

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As truth becomes more elusive, as fact blends with fiction, we ought to take notice of how we categorize people, as categorization seems to be married to suppression, to disenfranchisement. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Gonzalo Torné

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Acclaimed Spanish novelist Gonzalo Torné discusses his first novel to be translated into English, Divorce Is in the Air, his ideal reader, and the economic crisis in Spain. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Jericho Parms

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What is lost still has substance, is malleable, can take on new impressions, and be molded again to our experience, often resulting in the most lasting force that determines how we see the world. ...more

Barbizon Revisited

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For Lit Hub, Nathan Hill takes us through the history of the Barbizon Hotel, recounting its role as an incubator for young women writers of the mid-20th century and as a landmark for those same writers to touch upon and mythologize in their work:

Beyond Plath’s infamous retelling, the Barbizon has a strong association in popular culture as a rite-of-passage for “small-town” girls trying to make it in Manhattan.

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Belles of the Box Office

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The multifaceted Kirsten Dunst is going to direct a new film version of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar, and the lovely Dakota Fanning is set to star in it, the Guardian reports. “Dunst has co-written the film with Nellie Kim, while Fanning is a co-producer; shooting is scheduled to begin in early 2017,” the article said.

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The Rumpus Interview with Campbell McGrath

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Campbell McGrath talks about his new collection, XX: Poems For The Twentieth Century, capitalism, history, and what it might mean to write a wordless poem. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Essay: How To Make Sure Your Writing Is Forgotten

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Do you really want to have to listen from the grave as students discuss your themes and scholars analyze your syntax and trace your influence? ...more

Sylvia Plath’s Earliest Works

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Gothamist was recently given permission to share some of Sylvia Plath’s earliest manuscripts in a video on their website. The manuscripts, which include drawings, some of her favorite poems, and her own original poetry, are held in a private collection at the New York Public Library and are only accessible by researchers who make an appointment to see them:

The “juvenilia” items range from lighthearted (a drawing of a cat!) to heavy, and you never get a carefree vibe while looking at it.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: On Madness and Mad Men

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In my eight years as a Mad Men fan, the series has repeatedly prompted me to reflect on parenting. ...more

Book Recs from a River-Rafting Joan Didion

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To go with her contribution, Didion had to provide a few sentences about herself. Excavated from the Mademoiselle archives, what she wrote shows a still somewhat green, aspiring writer with a sentimental attachment to home: “Joan spends vacations river-rafting and small-boating in the picture-postcard atmosphere of the Sacramento Valley.” Among her interests, she lists “almost any book every published.”

Over at The New Republic, Laura Marsh reviews The Last Love Song, in which biographer Tracy Daugherty combs through the archives at Mademoiselle, where a 21-year-old Joan Didion worked as an intern.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Cornerstones of American Poetry

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The only way I can put it is, no American poet I have ever met regardless of disposition or poetics has disliked Frank Stanford’s poems. ...more

Sylvia Plath’s First Tragedy

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I don’t know whether it is a hereditary characteristic, but our little family is altogether too prone to lie awake at nights hating ourselves for stupidities—technical or verbal or whatever—and to let careless, cruel remarks fester until they blossom in something like ulcer attacks—I know that during these last days I’ve been fighting an enormous battle with myself.

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The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show: Cate Marvin

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In Episode 11 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Cate Marvin discusses her new collection, Oracle, marsupials, and why she'll never write a prose poem. ...more

The Incompletist

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I was excited to see the New York Times’s announcement that a regular column by the writer Geoff Dyer called “Reading Life” would be appearing in their weekend Book Review. I was even more intrigued and, somehow, encouraged, when eventually it appeared only three times. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Sarah Tomlinson

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Author Sarah Tomlinson talks about ghostwriting, her father and childhood, the tradition of confessional writing, and her new memoir, Good Girl. ...more