Posts Tagged: sylvia plath

From Your Mother

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Sylvia Plath is known as a writer and a poet, but she almost became a visual artist instead. Plath’s daughter, Frieda Hughes, who is also a painter and a poet, has created a book out of more than forty of her mother’s drawings.

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Sylvia Plath Inspires Adoration, Scorn

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Sylvia Plath has always been a polarizing figure, a fact underscored by the reaction to editions of her work recently released to mark fifty years since her death.

Are her poems humorless or funny to the point of kitschiness? Was Ted Hughes a “craggy, carnal bogeyman,” or a long-suffering husband “more sinned against than sinning”?

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“Living On Air”

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Via the Poetry Foundation, Open Culture has a 23-minute experimental film by Sandra Lahire using audio of Sylvia Plath reading her poems aloud.

Mixing images of Plath’s obsessions (ouija boards, horses, violent self-harm) with photographs of the poet and her work, the film delves deeply into an existence that Plath herself, in a voice-over interview, calls “living on air.”

Perfect for those of us who wish Plath would out of the ash rise with her red hair.

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“A ‘Fuck You’ to Women Everywhere”

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I can imagine complaining along these lines in an editorial meeting at a British publishing house, and being sighed at: “Yes, of course the 1960s cover is beautiful – I love it – but Waterstones and Tesco won’t stock it.”

At the London Review of Books‘ blog, Fatema Ahmed takes a critical look at the cover of a new edition of The Bell Jar, which depicts a woman applying makeup.

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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“Do not chew on the headphone cords!” — From @electriclit, passive aggressive library signs.

Marc Jacobs is pissing off literary West Villagers by opening a book store.

At The Guardian, Christine Granados has some fightin’ words for Cormac McCarthy and lists other authors she feels write the American southwest better.

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Poems Out Loud

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For National Poetry Month, Poems Out Loud is featuring people reading their favorite poems aloud. The construction worker who describes his job as “a lot of digging” loves Walt Whitman, and not just because he writes about “common Americans” and “physical labor.” Another man falls in love with poetry when he first encounters Sylvia Plath, even though she was a “well-heeled New England” woman, and he’s a Jamaican immigrant.

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