Posts Tagged: T.S. Eliot

Rehabbing Poets’ Broken Records

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New audio preservation technology just opened a treasure trove at Harvard: thousands of recordings of influential poets reading their work, once feared too deteriorated to salvage, are now being recovered. As WBUR reports, the IRENE program takes high-res 3D photographs of old records deemed too fragile to play with an ordinary needle, which can then be digitally converted into audio without the risk of damaging the original vinyl.

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Oliverdelapaz

The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show #6: Oliver de la Paz

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In Episode 6 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Dave Roderick chats with poet Oliver de la Paz about his new collection, Post Subject: A Fable, video games, and his weirdest writing habit.

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The Pleasure of Perfectly Positioned Punctuation

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As conscientious writers know, punctuation can make all the difference in a sentence, sculpting mush into meaning or cluing the reader in to nuances of intonation.

Vulture’s Kathryn Schulz has compiled some of literature’s most effective and memorable instances of punctuation, from Nabokov’s parenthetical “(picnic, lightning)” to the ellipses in T.

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T.S. Eliot’s Long-Lost Lecture

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In a letter of May 21, 1924, an English literary critic invited T.S. Eliot to speak to the club on “any subject connected with the Elizabethan drama.”

As late as November 6, Eliot told Richard Aldington that the lecture was “still in very rough shape.” Shortly afterward he wrote to Virginia Woolf that, despite all of his labors, it proved “unworthy of subsequent publication.”

Despite T.S.

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Happy Birthday, T. S. Eliot!

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Don’t let that Oxford education and British citizenship fool you: 125 years ago today, Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in St. Louis, Missouri.

He went on to become one of the defining voices of the modernist movement with poems like The Waste Land and plays like Murder in the Cathedral—oh, and that children’s book that eventually became the musical Cats.

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What Is Already Living: Author, Autobiography and Fiction in the Age of Social Networking

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WRITE YOUR STORY reads the advertising placard for corporate octopus Citibank on display in the Union Square subway station in Manhattan. The campaign’s thrust appears to be this: by spending money, being a consumer, one, in fact, indites a story on the face of the everyday.

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