Posts Tagged: T.S. Eliot

Moving Toward Answers: A Conversation with Stephen Mills

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Poet Stephen Mills discusses his first two collections, He Do the Gay Man in Different Voices and A History of the Unmarried, teaching writing, and what’s next.

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The Rumpus Interview with Ravi Shankar

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Ravi Shankar discusses Singaporean poetry in the last fifty years, Hindu mythology, translation, and his complicated relationship to his heritage.

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Remarks On Walking Around in Boston

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As you walk, you become intensely aware in two directions. There is the outer world, and there is your head space. It is not necessary or possible really to keep strict focus on one or the other. They blend together.

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A Look at Meek Mill vs. Drake through T.S. Eliot’s Writing

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Rappers Meek Mill and Drake have been come to blows lately, since Mill claimed Drake doesn’t write his own raps. This also launched a series of Meek Mill memes which Drake projected on stage at OVO Fest while he performed. All of this takes into question originality in art, and over at The Quietus, writer Karl Smith […]

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Too Much For Leopold Bloom to Keep Track Of

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Over at Guernica, Paul Stephens looks at the current state of “information overload,” and how it’s been explored in art from the avant-garde poetry of Lyn Hejinian to the conceptual writing of Kenneth Goldsmith, with additional commentary from Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot. A fascinating look at what may be the crisis of the millennial age.

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The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show: Cate Marvin

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In Episode 11 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Cate Marvin discusses her new collection, Oracle, marsupials, and why she’ll never write a prose poem.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Let’s talk about sentences. Let’s talk about how poets, when they let their lines run long to prose, can make sentences sing. And if we’re going to talk about those sentences, we must also talk about details. Details, details, and more details. It all started on waking Thursday morning and reading David Ebenbach’s “Nobody Else […]

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“And She Went on Her Way Rejoicing”

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Muriel Spark and the perennial question: “Am I a woman or an intellectual monster?”

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Was Prufrock the First Hipster?

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For the Atlantic, Karen Swallow Prior puts a new spin on the origin story of the “hipster,” arguing that T.S. Eliot’s J. Alfred Prufrock was actually one of the first: Prufrock of the cuffed white flannel trousers cultivates a detached earnestness that isn’t unlike the modern-day adult who is as eager to reject a hollow consumerism as […]

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Rehabbing Poets’ Broken Records

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New audio preservation technology just opened a treasure trove at Harvard: thousands of recordings of influential poets reading their work, once feared too deteriorated to salvage, are now being recovered. As WBUR reports, the IRENE program takes high-res 3D photographs of old records deemed too fragile to play with an ordinary needle, which can then […]

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The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show: Oliver de la Paz

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In Episode 6 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Dave Roderick chats with poet Oliver de la Paz about his new collection, Post Subject: A Fable, video games, and his weirdest writing habit.

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90% More Prose

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Calling all T.S Eliot nerds (or, just nerds): nearly 90% of Eliot’s prose has been unavailable or out-out-print; this year, Ronald Schuchard is publishing the first out of his eight-volume work, The Complete Prose of T.S Eliot.

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The Pleasure of Perfectly Positioned Punctuation

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As conscientious writers know, punctuation can make all the difference in a sentence, sculpting mush into meaning or cluing the reader in to nuances of intonation. Vulture’s Kathryn Schulz has compiled some of literature’s most effective and memorable instances of punctuation, from Nabokov’s parenthetical “(picnic, lightning)” to the ellipses in T. S. Eliot’s “The Love […]

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PJ Harvey Tuesday #4: “When Under Ether”

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By 2007, PJ Harvey had released six studio albums, which ran the gamut in style from explosive blues-punk to near-industrial electronica to soulful pop rock. To the surprise of all (and dismay of many), her seventh album, White Chalk, marked a dramatic departure from all that. Gone were the buzz-saw guitars and the androgynously low […]

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Happy Birthday, T. S. Eliot!

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Don’t let that Oxford education and British citizenship fool you: 125 years ago today, Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He went on to become one of the defining voices of the modernist movement with poems like The Waste Land and plays like Murder in the Cathedral—oh, and that children’s book that eventually became the […]

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Off the Page and Into the Microphone

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From Novels to Notes is a new blog by journalist Johnny Garcia chronicling songs inspired by fiction or poems. It’s still getting started, but it looks promising: there are already two entries about PJ Harvey, and there are bound to be more once Garcia discovers those lines she cribbed from T. S. Eliot. What are […]

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New T. S. Eliot Papers To Be Revealed

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If you enjoyed reading about T. S. Eliot’s first wife, Vivienne, in Rumpus interviewee Kate Zambreno’s book Heroines, you might be interested to know that Eliot’s second wife, Valerie, recently passed away at the age of 86. What does that mean for fans of modernist poetry? Biographers will have access to certain materials for the […]

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Kate Zambreno

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“I’m exposing faultlines, dealing especially with rhetoric. Showing that heterosexuality is a disease, or at least its inheritance.” Novelist, theorist, historian and blog-girl, Kate Zambreno gives up a meaty, definitive interview.

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Saturday History Lessons: On Emily Hale and T.S. Eliot

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One February night in T.S. Eliot’s mid-twenties, he went his aunt’s house in Boston. It was 1913, and the occasion was one of those delightful-sounding “evenings of amateur theatricals” that no one bothers with anymore. (It’s a tradition that really ought to be revived, if anyone’s asking me.) Eliot performed as Mr. Woodhouse in scenes […]

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What Is Already Living: Author, Autobiography and Fiction in the Age of Social Networking

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WRITE YOUR STORY reads the advertising placard for corporate octopus Citibank on display in the Union Square subway station in Manhattan. The campaign’s thrust appears to be this: by spending money, being a consumer, one, in fact, indites a story on the face of the everyday.

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