Posts Tagged: technology

Old Habits

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Unplugging is bound to free up some time; spending that time is another matter. After reading Mindful Tech, David M. Levy’s book about how and why we use devices, Matthew J.X. Malady decided to give the simple life a try:

I ran to the store for things we didn’t really need, and watered plants that I previously hadn’t noticed existed.

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A Truly Intersectional Future

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Florence Okoye, the founder of Afro Futures_UK, will be guest curator for an Afrofuturism-themed month at How We Get to Next. To kick off the collection, Okoye offers a long look into the abundance of futurist ideas and imagery, and the impact of social technology, in black culture:

Indeed, one of the best things about the movement is being able to dream of a truly intersectional future between any number of social identities… Afrofuturism is not just a genre— it’s a way to reframe science, history, technology, and religion, as well as race and society.

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Sound & Vision #18: Tony Visconti

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Legendary producer Tony Visconti talks to Allyson McCabe about working with David Bowie, his own touring musical super-group Holy Holy, and his thoughts on the music industry today. ...more

Video on Demand

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How many times have we been told that digital technology will fundamentally alter the way we interact with text?

There was hypertext fiction, which added hyperlinks so you could choose your own path through a story. Pfft. There was the enhanced e-book, which was like a regular e-book except it might decide to play audio at any moment, or show you a random video.

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How Gone Is My Valley?

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It does us all a disservice to separate the Valley’s current industrial action from that of its natural environment, human history and broader political context. ...more

Technology as Ecology

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Suzanne Jacobs writes for Grist about the work of philosopher/technologist Koert van Mensvoort and his new project, the Next Nature Network. Mensvoort’s work seeks to redefine the human civilization’s relationship with nature, a distinctly modern relationship which Jacobs describes as:

 …[a world] where wilderness no longer refers exclusively to those parts of the planet untouched by humans, but also to the so-called “technosphere” that we’ve wrapped around it.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review of The Martian

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It is the story of an astronaut stranded on Mars for about a year, all by himself. ...more

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The Japanese Toilet Takes a Bow: A Personal History

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I’ve long been afraid of toilets in Japan, beginning with the one in the temple we visited every summer starting in 1975, when my mother and I began to regularly go to her homeland in a bid to make sure I was familiar with her culture. ...more

Handwriting is Dead; Long Live Handwriting

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Type is the same, instance after instance, and the font you choose today will look the same when you type in it again tomorrow. The same is not true for crafting prose or poetry by hand, each looping connection between letters mapping out the inherently linear, temporal nature of language: the fact that for it to “work,” you must always be in the tumbling forward of reading.

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The Rumpus Interview with Andrew Ervin

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Andrew Ervin discusses his debut novel, Burning Down George Orwell’s House, social media and writing, and how video games can serve as a way to understand the post-human world. ...more

L-IT-erature

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Cohen is the perfect age to write such a book, having lived approximately an even number of years on either side of the pre-Web/post-Web divide. He gets “kids these days” and partakes of their Net-fueled narcissism, owning it in a way that earlier writers never could, but he has the erudition and historical grounding of a much older man, equally at home with Python code, Yiddish poets, porn sites, and prehistorical fertility sculptures.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jeremy Hawkins

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Author Jeremy Hawkins discusses his debut novel, The Last Days of Video, the resurgence of the independent bookstore industry, and allowing nostalgia to have presence but not precedence in one’s life. ...more