Posts Tagged: teenagers

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A Study of Homeland in Displacement

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To think of Brazil as a different place than I remember it is to think of my unbelonging, as someone out of place in my memory. ...more

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #5: Vulcan Mind Meld, Anyone?

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Your Storming Bohemian is emphatically a child of the early 70s. At fifteen, I lived in a hippie commune under the guidance of an eccentric psychologist, later diagnosed as bipolar. All I knew is, he was hella fun. Dr. Bill wasn’t the sort to make a fuss about school attendance, regular hours, pot smoking, or style of dress (or undress, for that matter).

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Visible: Women Writers of Color #4: Jaquira Díaz

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Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Rion Amilcar Scott’s debut collection Insurrections—our July Rumpus Book Club pick—comes out from University Press of Kentucky on Tuesday and is a timely and vital look into the daily struggles of individuals in the mostly black community of Cross River, Maryland, a fictional town that was founded by slaves in 1807 after a successful revolt.

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The Rumpus Review of Seoul Searching

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Seeing is a critical part of normalizing, and though it seems like a rudimentary expectation, it’s important for American audiences to see Korean-Americans simply living their lives. ...more

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Colorama

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How does one scene impress itself on us, so that we remember it better than we should if we were in it? Or rest, just below the surface, present, but unnoticed? ...more

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Rumpus Original Fiction: Monkey Men

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Still lying on the bed in the Wausau hotel room, I started counting ceiling tiles. From above the covers. Not under. Never under. I always feel constricted, under. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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It’s July, and the summer issues of literary magazines are rolling off both the physical and cyber presses, including Virginia Quarterly Review, which this week shared a story from its summer print issue online. In “Dixon” by Bret Anthony Johnston, author of the bestselling novel Remember Me Like This and the award-winning collection Corpus Christi, a father risks border patrol agents and losing his job to illegally sell a shipment of Dairy Queen kid’s meal toys in an effort to save his daughter.

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A Ringing in Your Ears That Would Disappear by Morning

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Soon, you would discover the local isle of misfits. Every town has at least one if you do some digging. Yours was The Boathouse. ...more

Guns N' Roses -Paradise City | Rumpus Music

Songs of Our Lives: Guns N’ Roses’s “Paradise City”

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When people asked what I was going to do after high school, I said, “Leave town.” I wasn’t kidding. I hadn’t applied to a single college. ...more

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Louise Erdrich

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The esteemed author talks about the themes of justice, atonement, and reparation in her fifteenth novel, LaRose, and about the importance of Planned Parenthood to her success. ...more

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Rumpus Original Fiction: On Documentation

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What is it like to be you? he was always asking, in his way, and it seemed a stupid question then. I didn’t know. I could lie better than I could tell the truth. I hadn’t left yet. ...more

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You’re Just a Sinner I Am Told: Prince & the Sexual Revolution

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It was all about desire, including women’s desire, Prince’s music. Women were not degraded. They were exalted, body and mind both. ...more

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Baltimore, Offline

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Social media’s role in all this is especially strange in that it makes people feel obligated to speak out, whether they’ve thought hard about their place in the discourse or not. ...more

The Others

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While Lani’s sole purpose in the book seemed to be a genderqueer Jiminy Cricket, pulling the wool back from Claire’s incredibly naïve eyes, they allowed me to look past the narrative I’d been told since birth.

Over at Lit Hub, Carla Bruce-Eddings recalls how reading What Happened to Lani Garver during high school helped her understand what “other” truly meant.

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Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #21: John Irving

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And that is how I feel about John Irving novels. That they gave me everything. ...more

It’s Literally Fine

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At the Atlantic, Adrienne LaFrance defends teenagers’ ever-maligned contributions to the lexicon, citing a recent student that examines the extent to which teens influence linguistic change:

And the thing about linguistic changes is they can’t exactly be stopped in any sort of deliberate way…Even old-school grammar geeks are warming up to “they” as an acceptable gender-neutral pronoun, understanding that culture doesn’t just trump language rules, it creates them—then destroys them, then creates new ones again.

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