Posts Tagged: Thoreau

Corinne Lee and Finding an Antidote to America’s Toxicity

By

Poet Corinne Lee on writing her epic book-length poem Plenty and finding new ways to live in a rapidly changing world.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jon Day

By

Jon Day discusses his memoir, Cyclogeography: Journeys of a London Bicycle Courier, the bicycle as a symbol of gentrification, and the city as “a technology for living.”

...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #4: Keep the Change

By

This week, your Storming Bohemian has moved to a new house. Again. And so some reflections: There is much to be said for stability, I know. The steady quiet observation of the likes of Annie Dillard or Henry Thoreau evokes my admiration. I am even an oblate of a Benedictine monastery. I know monks who […]

...more

Mommy Dearest

By

We have an unfortunate tendency to let motherhood eclipse all aspects of a person’s identity—and then to turn around and call motherhood a faulty aspiration. Luckily there are moms like Antonia Malchik who write anyway, and implore us to remember moms like Elinore Pruitt Stewart, who ventured out onto the Wyoming frontier with her daughter: Why is work like […]

...more
Guns N' Roses -Paradise City | Rumpus Music

Songs of Our Lives: Guns N’ Roses’s “Paradise City”

By

When people asked what I was going to do after high school, I said, “Leave town.” I wasn’t kidding. I hadn’t applied to a single college.

...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: The Pale of Vermont

By

But to become a writer I needed at least to learn about my own superstitions. I needed space in the house to sketch with words. I needed to commit heresies. And those acts had to feel pleasurable.

...more

Cabin in the Woods

By

It may not be 1869 anymore, but fear not: the golden age of conservation literature is far from over. As part of the Pacific Standard‘s week-long series on “opting-out,” Eva Holland writes about the tradition of environmental writing, from Thoreau to David Gessner. Also in the series: a patriarchal cult in Alaska, homesteading, and the “new domesticity.”

...more

The Walden game

By

Ready to achieve virtual self-reliance? The National Endowment for the Arts grant has recently awarded the University of Southern California a $40,000 grant to produce a video game based on Henry David Thoreau’s works where players can “follow in the virtual footsteps of Thoreau and conduct their own experiments in living deliberately.” Other literary-based media […]

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Robert Sullivan

By

Journalist Robert Sullivan often documents unlovely corners of the natural world: The Meadowlands (1998) turned a naturalist’s eye on a dispiriting region of northern New Jersey notable for its Mafia dumping grounds, while in Rats (2004) Sullivan gave Ratus norvegicus the Dian Fossey treatment. His latest book, The Thoreau You Don’t Know, attempts to recuperate […]

...more