Posts Tagged: Truman Capote

What to Read When You Want to Curl Up with a Good Book

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Rumpus editors share their favorite winter reads.

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The Logic of the Book: Talking with Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

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Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich discusses The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, the importance of narrative structure, and the difference between facts and stories.

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Peeping under the Goddamn Door: The Price of Empathy in S-Town

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[F]or the first time, I really see the tradeoffs between privacy and honest-to-god, up-close empathy.

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The Rumpus Interview with Mila Jaroniec

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Mila Jaroniec talks about her debut novel Plastic Vodka Bottle Sleepover,” writing autofiction, the surprising similarity between selling sex toys and selling books, and the impact of having a baby on editing.

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The Last Book I Loved: So Long, See You Tomorrow

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By drawing us into his childhood, Maxwell shows us how to revisit our own. We become the storytellers of our own lives.

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The Rumpus Interview with Charles Bock

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Charles Bock discusses his new novel, Alice & Oliver, the challenges of writing from experience, and how art and life can mirror one another.

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Remembering In Cold Blood

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To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, David Hayes and Sarah Weinman discuss what makes the book, as well as Capote’s other works, so remarkable: For centuries we’ve been enraptured and revolted, thrilled and petrified, by crime stories and what meaning they might have. So no wonder Truman […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Thomas H. McNeely

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Thomas H. McNeely discusses coming of age in the 1970s, Houston’s complicated racial history, and his new novel Ghost Horse.

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True Lies

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At Salon, Laura Miller covers a recent update in the ongoing criticism of—and legal proceedings involving—Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. Ronald Nye, the son of Harold Nye, a former agent for the Kansas Bureau of Investigation who has since died, can finally publish his father’s documents. These notes that he kept during the case present […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Alex Dimitrov and Kate Durbin

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Alex Dimitrov and Kate Durbin interview each other about place and poetics and poetry in performance, as well as poetry in LA and New York, and using culture as a prop.

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“I’ll wait while they read it”

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There is much more to Truman Capote than just being the man behind Breakfast at Tiffany’s and In Cold Blood. Beyond the slow, warbling flamboyant character that has been portrayed in the movies, he was one of the last self-invented writers. His formal education stopped at high school, and his only employment experience was a […]

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Capote Fans’ Prayers Answered

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Buried treasure has been unearthed at the New York Public Library: six unpublished pages of Truman Capote’s unfinished novel Answered Prayers. They’re from a chapter called “Yachts and Things,” and you can read them in this month’s Vanity Fair. If you read the online version, you get to see Capote’s handwriting and strikeouts, but if […]

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“Who the hell is interested, anyway?”

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In 1957, Truman Capote had done it again. Written for The New Yorker, “The Duke in His Domain” dissolved the absolute mystery surrounding Marlon Brando. And of course, it was Capote, and The New Yorker, so the writing was rich as chocolate cake, and the source unquestionable. Douglas McCollam writes about the pivotal event, and about the incredible […]

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #45: Chloe Caldwell in Conversation with Sarah Kilborne

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I interviewed author, Sarah Kilborne, who lives in the same town as I do, Hudson, New York, and takes banjo lessons downstairs in my father’s music store that I live above. We had dinner a few months ago, where I picked her brain about the writing life, and we both overate pasta. It struck me […]

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How Well Do You Know Truman Capote?

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Truman Capote’s social celebrity is a defining feature of his legacy—it added another element to his literary prowess and his visible lifestyle was definitely a point of contention for people. Many people had things to say about his lifestyle, and he had his opinions to offer in return. Inspired by this, is a Truman Capote […]

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