Posts Tagged: twitter

The Great American Tweeter

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Reading Literary Twitter is to witness brief, terse glimpses into the writerly psyche, and how insecure and unsure and thin-skinned we tend to be. As writers, we want to be validated. We want to matter. The published stories and poems and essays, the books we sell, the magazines we edit: all this output, this paper expelled out to the world, the screens we invade with our narratives, it all matters to us.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Crushed

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He’s a cute mensch, I gathered, a cuddly fellow with a well- groomed beard, sad eyes, and, most importantly, a comforting voice that sounded like he was about to either cry or laugh. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Ben Fama

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Ben Fama talks about his first full-length poetry collection, Fantasy, the New Narrative movement, and the worst thing that could happen at the Chateau Marmont. ...more

Girl Not in Your MFA

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That Guy in Your MFA is neither a guy nor a student in an MFA program. He’s actually a woman, Dana Schwartz, a Brown University undergraduate. Schwartz also runs the twitter Dystopian YA Novel that satirizes series like Divergent. She tells Chicago Reader that she invented the alter egos because her writing workshops had too many stories about guys on trains:

“They all had trains,” she says, “and a man leaving his family because he is too complicated and deep.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The (Online) Stories We Tell

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Sometimes you want to dream about the life you didn’t get to have. Sometimes you want to see the life you were lucky to escape. ...more

Tooting Your Own Horn

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Should writers retweet their own praise? Insofar as Twitter is a platform for self-promotion, sharing positive reviews seems logical—but when a publishing medium does double duty as a sphere of social interaction, this logic gets complicated:

Twitter, as a public platform, is intrinsically performative (to pretend otherwise is disingenuous), yet the performative nature of it is undercut and often ameliorated in ways that make Twitter tolerable and even enjoyable, by some level of honesty…In that way, Twitter and its ethics are not so different from, and no more thornier than, actual life.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, last week, men who have taken lives are walking away unpunished, unquestioned even. We have their victims’ names: Mike Brown. Eric Garner. We have their final words: Hands up, don’t shoot. (Six shots fired.) I can’t breathe.

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The Rumpus Interview with Richard Ford

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Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist Richard Ford discusses his new book, Let Me Be Frank With You, how metaphor shapes our world, and why he doesn't like the idea he has a battery to recharge. ...more

Distractions and the Art of Creation

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Alexandra Wuest, writing at HTMLGIANT, looks at the distinction between procrastination and the useful distraction that is a necessary part of the creative act:

Somewhere between the initial conception of an idea and the completion of the project exists a murky abyss of abstraction in which the horizon line is hidden–or may not even exist.

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Thinking About Tweeting About Working on My Novel

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Artist Cory Arcangel recently curated a collection of tweets containing the phrase “working on my novel” to produce a book of the same name. The New Yorker’s Mark O’Connell wonders whywhy he did it, why they tweeted it, and why it matters to us:

…it’s hard to imagine a book providing a more solid pretext for discussions of social media and creativity, or the death of the novel, or any number of other means by which the think-piecing superego might impose itself on the culture.

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