Posts Tagged: twitter

This Week in Short Fiction

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On Monday, Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell began tweeting a short story called “The Right Sort” in multiple daily installments, compiled by Sceptre Books, readable from the top down. Set to conclude today, the story takes the Valium-filtered perspective of a young teen in 1970s England.

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Young Writer Cold, Too Many Drafts

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You may have encountered the six word story in lit class, Hemingway’s“For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Follow us here for a site dedicated to them.

Six-Word Memoirs is hosting the #SixWords Festival on Twitter, June 4th-6th. To kick the event off, Maria Shriver, Katherine Schwarzenegger, and Molly Ringwald will be judging the “Best Advice in Six Words” challenge.

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In Defense of Twitter Poetry

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Twitter is like a digital notebook for collecting observations, Rhys Nixon describes over at Entropy, making it an ideal platform for poetry and expression. Twitter also combines humor and absurdism, two elements often overlooked in more conventional literature. But perhaps the most significant characteristic of Twitter is the collaborative process essential to all creative forms.

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Details Emerging for Amtrak Writing Residency

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The Amtrak Writer Residency—an impromptu marketing program conceived of over Twitter—finally seems to be taking shape. After Alexander Chee mentioned his enjoyment of writing on trains, Amtrak jumped at the chance for some positive press and announced a residency program that would pair writers with sleeper compartments on long haul routes.

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Twitter: The Next Great American Novel

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Fans of the hit television show “The Office” will surely know that former “Office” star BJ Novak has come out with a collection of stories entitled One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories. Find out on Mashable why Novak thinks social media may unleash a new generation of prolific writers:

“[Social media] makes everyone aware of the minutia of conversation in literary form,” Novak told Mashable.

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Twitter, Unplugged

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Writing from Turkey, a country that temporarily unplugged Twitter to quell government protests, novelist and essayist Kaya Genç describes the experience of disconnecting from the service. Instead of the liberation he expected, the lack of Twitter left him feeling like a prisoner in solitary confinement:

On my third day without Twitter, however, I realized that I couldn’t say about Twitter what Sartre had said about hell.

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Teju Cole Tweets 4,000-Word Essay

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Last week Teju Cole published a 4,000-word non-fiction essay on immigration, titled “A Piece of the Wall,” entirely on Twitter. BuzzFeed spoke with Cole about his decision to share the piece via the social media platform, the challenges in doing so, and his views on immigration reform:

I’m not getting my hopes up, but the point of writing about these things, and hoping they reach a big audience, has nothing to do with “innovation” or with “writing.” It’s about the hope that more and more people will have their conscience moved about the plight of other human beings.

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Announcing the Twitter Fiction Festival Lineup

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The third annual Twitter Fiction Festival (March 12–16), sponsored by Penguin Random House and the Association of American Publishers, just announced its schedule of featured storytellers.

Highlights include a meta horror story by Benjamin Percy, Star Wars in tweets by Ian Doescher, a sinful beach house weekend told in real time by Julia Fierro, the hidden erotic inner life of Downton Abbey’s Mr.

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Roxane Gay on the Joys and Perils of Twitter

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When we debate modernity, we tend to engage in all-or-nothing propositions. Technology is either wholly good or wholly destructive. Somewhere between these two extremes is where we will find the truth.

Our rock-star essays editor Roxane Gay has an essay titled “What Twitter Does” up at Editorially‘s new “writers’ journal on culture and technology,” STET.

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Less Face, More Book for These Reclusive Authors

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Though it can be hard to remember between tweeting at your favorite writer and joining a Facebook event page for a reading, there was a time when many authors led reclusive lives with minimal self-promotion.

Bookish has rounded up a list of some of the most private (Salinger, Pynchon)—and their modern-day, super-public opposites (John Green, Susan Orlean).

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On Buying Your Friends

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The San Francisco Bay Guardian‘s current cover story is about the culture surrounding Twitter bots that artificially inflate your follower count: who buys them, why, and where you can buy them yourself.

The story’s author, Caitlin Donohue, picked up a few thousand profane, banal nonhuman followers for $26, a process she describes as “like an Internet boob job,” and which seemed to send positive ripples into her real life.

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Twitter Fiction Festival A Success

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Previously, we blogged about Rumpus contributor Elliott Holt’s Twitter mystery. As it turns out, Rumpus contributor and interviewee Scott Hutchins wrote one as well, a San Francisco noir called “The Nanny.”

They were both part of the five-day Twitter Fiction Festival, which the Los Angeles Times calls the “first official effort to organize and present a creative event that uses the social networking site…as a forum for art.”

Read the rest of their coverage to learn more about how a 140-character limit places restrictions on fiction writers—and lets them be inventive in unexpected ways.

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