Posts Tagged: twitter

Joy to the World

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Over at New York magazine, Adam Sternbergh’s written an intricate, affecting, and (honest to god) shocking elegy in awe of the emoji. If he comes to a single conclusion, it’s that every single one of them is here to stay:

Over 470 million Joy emoji are being sent back and forth on Twitter right now—which makes the Joy emoji the No. 1 most popular emoji on Twitter (it tends to compete for the top spot with the Heart).

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Distractions and the Art of Creation

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Alexandra Wuest, writing at HTMLGIANT, looks at the distinction between procrastination and the useful distraction that is a necessary part of the creative act:

Somewhere between the initial conception of an idea and the completion of the project exists a murky abyss of abstraction in which the horizon line is hidden–or may not even exist.

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Thinking About Tweeting About Working on My Novel

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Artist Cory Arcangel recently curated a collection of tweets containing the phrase “working on my novel” to produce a book of the same name. The New Yorker’s Mark O’Connell wonders whywhy he did it, why they tweeted it, and why it matters to us:

…it’s hard to imagine a book providing a more solid pretext for discussions of social media and creativity, or the death of the novel, or any number of other means by which the think-piecing superego might impose itself on the culture.

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What Twitter Could Mean for Fiction

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Following the publication of David Mitchell’s short story “The Right Sort” on Twitter last week, Ian Crouch considers the possibilities and limitations of the medium for fiction. He admires some of Mitchell’s tweets, wonders if the story isn’t actually better read all at once, and suggests “The Great American Twitter Novel” could potentially exist:

I like to think that there is another kind of fiction to be written, the truest expression of the form, which embraces the quotidian nature of Twitter and its movements in real time.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Monday, Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell began tweeting a short story called “The Right Sort” in multiple daily installments, compiled by Sceptre Books, readable from the top down. Set to conclude today, the story takes the Valium-filtered perspective of a young teen in 1970s England.

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Young Writer Cold, Too Many Drafts

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You may have encountered the six word story in lit class, Hemingway’s“For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Follow us here for a site dedicated to them.

Six-Word Memoirs is hosting the #SixWords Festival on Twitter, June 4th-6th. To kick the event off, Maria Shriver, Katherine Schwarzenegger, and Molly Ringwald will be judging the “Best Advice in Six Words” challenge.

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In Defense of Twitter Poetry

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Twitter is like a digital notebook for collecting observations, Rhys Nixon describes over at Entropy, making it an ideal platform for poetry and expression. Twitter also combines humor and absurdism, two elements often overlooked in more conventional literature. But perhaps the most significant characteristic of Twitter is the collaborative process essential to all creative forms.

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Details Emerging for Amtrak Writing Residency

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The Amtrak Writer Residency—an impromptu marketing program conceived of over Twitter—finally seems to be taking shape. After Alexander Chee mentioned his enjoyment of writing on trains, Amtrak jumped at the chance for some positive press and announced a residency program that would pair writers with sleeper compartments on long haul routes.

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Twitter: The Next Great American Novel

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Fans of the hit television show “The Office” will surely know that former “Office” star BJ Novak has come out with a collection of stories entitled One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories. Find out on Mashable why Novak thinks social media may unleash a new generation of prolific writers:

“[Social media] makes everyone aware of the minutia of conversation in literary form,” Novak told Mashable.

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Twitter, Unplugged

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Writing from Turkey, a country that temporarily unplugged Twitter to quell government protests, novelist and essayist Kaya Genç describes the experience of disconnecting from the service. Instead of the liberation he expected, the lack of Twitter left him feeling like a prisoner in solitary confinement:

On my third day without Twitter, however, I realized that I couldn’t say about Twitter what Sartre had said about hell.

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Teju Cole Tweets 4,000-Word Essay

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Last week Teju Cole published a 4,000-word non-fiction essay on immigration, titled “A Piece of the Wall,” entirely on Twitter. BuzzFeed spoke with Cole about his decision to share the piece via the social media platform, the challenges in doing so, and his views on immigration reform:

I’m not getting my hopes up, but the point of writing about these things, and hoping they reach a big audience, has nothing to do with “innovation” or with “writing.” It’s about the hope that more and more people will have their conscience moved about the plight of other human beings.

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Announcing the Twitter Fiction Festival Lineup

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The third annual Twitter Fiction Festival (March 12–16), sponsored by Penguin Random House and the Association of American Publishers, just announced its schedule of featured storytellers.

Highlights include a meta horror story by Benjamin Percy, Star Wars in tweets by Ian Doescher, a sinful beach house weekend told in real time by Julia Fierro, the hidden erotic inner life of Downton Abbey’s Mr.

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Roxane Gay on the Joys and Perils of Twitter

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When we debate modernity, we tend to engage in all-or-nothing propositions. Technology is either wholly good or wholly destructive. Somewhere between these two extremes is where we will find the truth.

Our rock-star essays editor Roxane Gay has an essay titled “What Twitter Does” up at Editorially‘s new “writers’ journal on culture and technology,” STET.

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