Posts Tagged: Ursula K. Le Guin

The Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Goes to… Kenny G

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Rumpus editors share our Nobel Prize in Literature predictions with you! ...more

Between Autonomy and Powerlessness: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

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Women’s bodies signify so much, both to ourselves and others, that inhabiting them and having ownership over them often feel like two different states of being. ...more

Hitch in the Voice

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I hear a man singing for his life, desperate in a way he would never be again and had never been before. ...more

Album of the Week: Call It Love by Briana Marela

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Call It Love is Briana Marela’s third album, and her first after signing with Jagjaguwar. In the album’s ten tracks, the Seattleite explores the many facets of love, from its early sweet moments to the ending of a relationship, with a detour inspired by the book The Farthest Shore by Ursula K Le Guin.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, the writers and books that influenced it, tackling addiction with compassion, and the magic of teenage girls. ...more

Steering Clear of “McMagic”

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At the New Yorker, an elegant and comprehensive essay by Julie Phillips from a visit with Ursula Le Guin at her home in Portland, Oregon touches on the importance of place, both geographic and imaginative. Phillips writes, “[Le Guin] has always defended the fantastic, by which she means not formulaic fantasy or “McMagic” but the imagination as a subversive force.” She quotes Le Guin: “Imagination, working at full strength, can shake us out of our fatal, adoring self-absorption and make us look up and see—with terror or with relief—that the world does not in fact belong to us at all.”

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Google vs. Author’s Guild

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The fight against Google’s digital library continues, and this time the effort has support from big-name authors like Margaret Atwood, Ursula K. Le Guin, Malcolm Gladwell, Peter Carey, and J. M. Coetzee. The case against Google making millions of books—many of them still under copyright protection—searchable online without paying for any licenses to do so goes back to 2005. 

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The Rumpus Interview with Lincoln Michel

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Lincoln Michel talks about his debut short story collection, Upright Beasts, his interest in monsters, and what sources of culture outside of literature inspire him. ...more

Fresh Comics #4: Making Babies!

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Aside from defecating or having sex, giving birth is one of the most common life experiences. Half of the world’s population is capable of doing it and every single one of us has been through it, even if we have no memory of it.

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Le Guin Will Answer Writers’ Questions

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At 86, Ursula K. Le Guin says she doesn’t have the stamina for writing novels or teaching workshops anymore. That doesn’t mean she doesn’t want to share her knowledge and experience with others. Writers can now submit questions of 200 words or less to Le Guin, and she will answer the ones she feels compelled by:

Reliable vigor and stamina is also required to teach a class or run a workshop, and so I had to give up teaching several years ago.

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The Rumpus Interview with Monica Byrne

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Monica Byrne talks about sex, gender, the insidious power of stereotypes, and putting relationships between women at the center of her novel, The Girl in the Road. ...more

Here There (May or May Not) Be Dragons

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Kazuo Ishiguro’s new novel The Buried Giant has reignited debates about genre fiction following Ishiguro’s implication that the work isn’t fantasy. The author has since clarified which side he’s really on. Meanwhile, Flavorwire‘s Jonathon Sturgeon defends Ishiguro’s right to call the book whatever he wants:

To use some of Le Guin’s own logic: we still live under capitalism, and the concept of genre is still tied to marketing.

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If It Quacks like a Dragon

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Kazuo Ishiguro insists his new novel, The Buried Giant, is not a fantasy novel. Laura Miller at Salon agrees. Ursula K. Le Guin does not (and is a little insulted). David Barnett at The Guardian doesn’t care either way and instead sees Ishiguro’s novel as an opportunity:

Why not throw open the gates, tear down the walls, and when literary authors appropriate the tropes of genre, see it not as an insult but as a good thing, something that potentially allows us to be evangelical about the books we love to a whole new audience?

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The Rumpus Interview with Robert Repino

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Robert Repino talks about his debut novel, Mort(e), the publishing industry, science fiction and literary fiction, writing about religion, and how to write about complex chemical ant languages. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jeff VanderMeer

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Jeff VanderMeer discusses the environment, his childhood, and the conception and conclusion of his Southern Reach Trilogy. ...more

Ursula K. Le Guin’s Prophetic Speech Wins the NBAs

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In her speech at the National Book Awards on Wednesday, Ursula K. Le Guin shares her Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters with “all the writers who were excluded from literature for so long,” blasts the commercialization of literature and the greed of publishers, and predicts:

I think hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now .

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Monday, Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell began tweeting a short story called “The Right Sort” in multiple daily installments, compiled by Sceptre Books, readable from the top down. Set to conclude today, the story takes the Valium-filtered perspective of a young teen in 1970s England.

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