Posts Tagged: vice

Tech Companies Profit While Writers Starve

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Digital media companies are suddenly worried about declining ad revenue, and the venture capitalists funding these companies have also turned off the faucet of cash as they realize that success stories like BuzzFeed and Mashable are not the unicorns everyone thought they were.

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The Dark Web’s Literary Journal

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For Motherboard at VICE, Joseph Cox interviews the two creators of The Torist, the first literary journal created and available solely on the dark web. Robert W. Gehl, the public liaison for the journal, noted that creating a journal on the dark web was meant “to swim against the current popular conceptions of anonymity and encryption.”

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This Week in Short Fiction

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The first books of 2016 are rolling off the presses this week, and among them is Samantha Hunt’s third novel, Mr. Splitfoot, which is already earning buzz for its prize-winning potential. It’s a modern gothic ghost story involving meteor craters, conmen, twins who channel spirits, a mysterious aunt who doesn’t speak, and a pregnant woman who follows said aunt in an on-foot odyssey across New York state toward some unknown end.

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Writing a Women’s History of Science

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For Motherboard at VICE, Victoria Turk writes on the gender biases still present in writing histories of female scientists. Turk focuses on the legacies of Ada Lovelace, Marie Curie, and even Florence Nightingale, whose roles as a statistician and social reformer are overlooked in favor of the more traditionally feminine narrative of her contributions to nursing.

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Moshfegh author phot credit Krystal Griffiths

The Rumpus Interview with Ottessa Moshfegh

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Ottessa Moshfegh discusses her first full-length novel, Eileen, betrayal, self-aware narrators, and the catalytic properties of friendship. ...more

The Truthening of Science Fiction

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Cecilia D’Anastasio explores the origins of science fiction via Lucian of Samosata’s True History. Lucian’s True History, a second-century satire of contemporary travel writing that took classical mythology and its monsters at face value. D’Anastasio questions the themes that define science fiction, such as how deeply science and technology must be integrated to classify a work as “science fiction.”

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The Thomas Pynchon Myth

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Thomas Pynchon is a reclusive author—or so we are told. Vice unearths the origins of Pynchon’s famous isolation, attributing the legend to the Paris Review‘s George Plimpton:

It all started 51 years ago, in 1963, when George Plimpton in the New York Times published the line: “Pynchon is in his early twenties; he writes in Mexico City—a recluse.” It is doubtful if Plimpton, who helped create the Paris Review, knew at the time that he was accidentally kicking off the largest and longest game of Where’s Waldo?

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This Week in Short Fiction

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As civil servants in heavily militarized gear keep the Ferguson community under surveillance and the rest of us glued to the Internet for increasingly shocking reports of brutality and awe, we need another good story this week. Enter the Coffee House Press Black Arts Movement Series.

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