Posts Tagged: vice

Queering the Canon

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For VICE, Lindsay King-Miller examines the literary tradition of retelling and reworking classic stories and the importance of bringing queer arcs in particular to our old standbys:

Revisiting a story gives us an opportunity to explore universal experiences from the perspective of those who weren’t represented in the original, and nowhere is this more apparent than in today’s generation of young writers and artists bringing overt queerness into the literary canon.

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The Honesty of Kathleen Hanna

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Kathleen Hanna sat down with VICE’s Kim Taylor Bennett and immediately began a very honest and powerful discussion of her experience with tokenism, how we won’t live in a post-sexist world until the rape crisis hotline stops ringing off the hook and women’s shelter rooms aren’t packed, and the incredibly difficult work of unpacking the damage perpetrated by abuse.

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The Power of Thought

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Over at VICE, Lauren Oyler interviews Mark Greif, author of the recently released Against Everything. Greif trains his keen thinking on current culture, from the almost paradoxical way sanctimony and change seem to go hand in hand of late, to the unnerving fact that loneliness itself may have recently been altered:

…in an era of cellphones, everyone seems to have someone to talk to.

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Sound & Vision #24: Ebru Yildiz

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Brooklyn-based photographer Ebru Yildiz talks with Allyson McCabe about shooting concert photos, moving to New York from Turkey, and discovering the city’s music scene. ...more

Just Kidding

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Heads up, Harry Potter fans: the staff over at VICE confirm that J.K. Rowling will be coming out with three more short stories about Hogwarts. The stories will provide background to some of the secondary characters in the Harry Potter series:

Power, Politics, and Pesky Poltergeists centers on Voldemort’s ties with Professor Horace Slughorn at Hogwarts; Heroism, Hardship, and Dangerous Hobbies offers a look into Professor McGonagall’s roots; and Hogwarts: An Incomplete and Unreliable Guide provides readers with everything they ever wanted to know about Harry’s prestigious wizarding school.

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Dinosaurs, Aliens, and Rappers

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In its infinite wisdom, VICE has produced a show for the company’s TV channel, VICELAND, where Action Bronson and his friends smoke themselves into oblivion while they try to grapple with the immensity of history and the cosmos as communicated by cheeseball history documentaries.

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Writing Gives Me No Happiness

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A novel wants to befriend you, a short story almost never.

Over at VICE, Lincoln Michel nabbed the elusive and brilliant Joy Williams for an interview about her newest short story collection, ninety-nine stories of God. Her answers are wonderful in their minimalist nature, and for lovers of lists she even included “8 Essential Attributes of the Short Story (and one way it differs from a novel).”

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Breaking the Script

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There’s a tendency to take writers who write about race and shuffle them into a genre, into a predetermined conversation, whether they wanted to be there or not. But even if the constraints of the game are rigged, what Jenny Zhang, Tanwi Nandini Islam, and Karan Mahajan have to say cuts through the BS pretty quickly:

It’s a real detriment to the quality of these spaces when they end up being dominated by white folks.

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Tech Companies Profit While Writers Starve

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Digital media companies are suddenly worried about declining ad revenue, and the venture capitalists funding these companies have also turned off the faucet of cash as they realize that success stories like BuzzFeed and Mashable are not the unicorns everyone thought they were.

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The Dark Web’s Literary Journal

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For Motherboard at VICE, Joseph Cox interviews the two creators of The Torist, the first literary journal created and available solely on the dark web. Robert W. Gehl, the public liaison for the journal, noted that creating a journal on the dark web was meant “to swim against the current popular conceptions of anonymity and encryption.”

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This Week in Short Fiction

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The first books of 2016 are rolling off the presses this week, and among them is Samantha Hunt’s third novel, Mr. Splitfoot, which is already earning buzz for its prize-winning potential. It’s a modern gothic ghost story involving meteor craters, conmen, twins who channel spirits, a mysterious aunt who doesn’t speak, and a pregnant woman who follows said aunt in an on-foot odyssey across New York state toward some unknown end.

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Writing a Women’s History of Science

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For Motherboard at VICE, Victoria Turk writes on the gender biases still present in writing histories of female scientists. Turk focuses on the legacies of Ada Lovelace, Marie Curie, and even Florence Nightingale, whose roles as a statistician and social reformer are overlooked in favor of the more traditionally feminine narrative of her contributions to nursing.

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Moshfegh author phot credit Krystal Griffiths

The Rumpus Interview with Ottessa Moshfegh

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Ottessa Moshfegh discusses her first full-length novel, Eileen, betrayal, self-aware narrators, and the catalytic properties of friendship. ...more

The Truthening of Science Fiction

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Cecilia D’Anastasio explores the origins of science fiction via Lucian of Samosata’s True History. Lucian’s True History, a second-century satire of contemporary travel writing that took classical mythology and its monsters at face value. D’Anastasio questions the themes that define science fiction, such as how deeply science and technology must be integrated to classify a work as “science fiction.”

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