Posts Tagged: Video Games

Video Games as Poetry

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Space in video games is not, strictly speaking, physical. It’s made of pixels on a screen, and the movement of objects within it are governed by the algorithms of its central processing unit. This artificiality has the ironic effect of making the world inside of a video game more immediately familiar than the world beyond our living rooms, as if the game is a memory we didn’t know we had.

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Digital Technology is Valid Literature

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Digital technology is changing literature. Those changes are more than just variations on traditional forms like the novel. Video game storytelling, for instance, is a perfectly valid form of art and yet often lacks recognition in the literary world. That needs to change, argues Naomi Alderman over at the Guardian:

The problem is that people who like science and technology, and people who like storytelling and the arts have typically been placed in different buildings since about the age of 16.

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The Rumpus Interview with Matt Bell

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Author Matt Bell talks video games, fiction, nonfiction, politics, empathy, and his new books, Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn and Scrapper. ...more

The Video Game Literati

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Tobias Carroll, writing for Hazlitt, dissects the influence video games have had on literature, from writers like Ernest Cline of Ready Player One to Jonathan Lethem and an entire literary anthology, Press Start to Play. We’re only waiting for Franzen to admit his obsession with playing as Oddjob in Goldeye 64, making all his friends hate him.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Growing Up Gaming

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“Is this inclusive or exclusive?” he asked with a creased brow. “I don’t like the idea that we’re being treated as a joke.” ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Andrew Ervin

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Andrew Ervin discusses his debut novel, Burning Down George Orwell’s House, social media and writing, and how video games can serve as a way to understand the post-human world. ...more

Matthew Baker

The Rumpus Interview with Matthew Baker

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"Master fictioneer" Matthew Baker talks about his new middle grade novel, If You Find This, artists as tricksters, his favorite comic strips, and why children are still capable of believing in impossible things. ...more

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The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show #6: Oliver de la Paz

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In Episode 6 of The Rumpus Late Nite Poetry Show, Dave Roderick chats with poet Oliver de la Paz about his new collection, Post Subject: A Fable, video games, and his weirdest writing habit. ...more

Love (or Something), Virtually

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And the winner of Best Opening Line Ever goes to: “I was a gay man playing ‘Warcraft’ as a beautiful woman, and he was a Mormon virgin. Our romance was a time bomb.”

Over at Salon, Elliot Glen tells the story of his pixel-mediated relationship with a callow, straight, Mormon virgin:

I first met SaltySaber in a dark and dangerous swamp, where he answered my desperate cry for help and rescued me from a gaggle of ruthless ghosts .

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Pong Was Not For Boys

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How did video games go from being completely gender-neutral to being the centerpiece of a male-dominated, often misogynistic subculture?

Polygon’s Tracy Lien investigates in a fascinating history of the industry’s relationship to gender.

It’s interesting whether you’re into video games or not—though, as the article points out, if you play Bejeweled, Angry Birds, or even Windows Solitaire, you may be more into video games than you think.

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I’m Not A Novelist, But I Play One In a Video Game

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The writing life isn’t a game—except when it is.

The Novelist, an indie video game by Kent Hudson, lets you play at being a author without having to put pen to paper…though the game doesn’t seem too much easier than the real thing:

…you’re presented with the same fundamental question in nine different ways over the course of the game, that you start to learn about your own values.

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Alaska Native Culture as a Game—But Not a Joke

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If you liked reading about narrative video games about the trans experience, you’re sure to enjoy this Polygon piece on “the first indigenous-owned games company in the United States.”

Like a heist movie, the essay introduces the players (an Alaska Native educator and two games developers), sets up the stakes (the stereotypes of Native Americans that saturate the media), and then delivers the goods: the game they created together, about a young girl surviving in the Arctic.

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