Posts Tagged: Vietnam War

A Specific Kind of Loneliness: In Conversation with Geeta Kothari

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Geeta Kothari discusses her debut collection, American xenophobia, and the immigrant narrative. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #86: Max Allan Collins

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In April, the Mystery Writers of America named Max Allan Collins a Grand Master, the organization’s peer-voted lifetime achievement award. Collins has had a prolific and often eclectic career. The Iowa Writers Workshop graduate has written more than one hundred books, has had a long career as a comics writer including, most famously, the Road to Perdition saga, has been a screenwriter and director of fiction and documentary films, written audio dramas and nonfiction books.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 13): “Letter to Simic from Boulder”

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"Wherever you are on earth, you are safe,” writes Richard Hugo. Really? ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Viet Than Nguyen discusses his story collection The Refugees, growing up in a Vietnamese community in San Jose in the 1980s, and the power of secondhand memories. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #15: Contemplation + Politics

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Thomas Merton, the most prominent Catholic monk of the 20th century, famously left the world to live a cloistered life at the Cistercian Abbey of Gethsemini in rural Kentucky, taking vows and becoming Father Louis. As many will recall, he described his journey to the cloister in one of the century’s masterpieces of memoir, The Seven Story Mountain.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #68: David Kukoff

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“To read,” wrote E.M. Cioran, “is to let someone else do the work for you.” Indeed, David Kukoff has done extensive footwork collecting an array of varied experiences to give us an idea of what it was to live in LA during what might arguably be one of its most pivotal decades.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Great Elk

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For a moment, seeing the small figures walking before the elk makes me think that white people know the Great Elk too. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 7): “Facing It”

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There should be no forgetting, much less forgiveness, of what happened during the Vietnam War. ...more

Wanted/Needed/Loved: Thao Nguyen’s Release

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The thing I want to talk about is something I’m not in possession of anymore, but of all the things I’ve lost it’s the thing I think about the most. ...more

Song of the Day: “Luv N’ Haight”

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Sly and the Family Stone’s anarchic album There’s a Riot Goin’ On, released in 1971 following several tumultuous years in America, has been called “blunt and unflinching” and “very much informed by drugs” and “paranoia.” While the funk group’s creative dynamo, Sly Stone, had indeed been sidelined by drug abuse for months, his disillusionment with the failed promise of the 60s permeates the album.

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A Blind Eye to History

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At Aeon, Robert Neer discusses the particular absence of military history from American universities. While general history courses cover the overall societal impact of some military campaigns and political science covers the effect of military action on government, Neer notes a lack of scholarship (and scrutiny) from academics on military action since the Vietnam War.

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The Dilemma of Wartime Journalism

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At Guernica, Richard Falk discusses journalism during the Vietnam War and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and how remaining ‘objective’ is actually being biased by turning a blind-eye to suffering:

I came to realize that the journalistic ethos as applied to foreign policy was indifferent to the wartime suffering of the enemy population and a humanitarian catastrophe of massive proportions.

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The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Author Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses his debut novel, The Sympathizer, new ways of looking at the Vietnam War, and how to blend important ideas with entertainment. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Tomi Ungerer

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Writer and illustrator Tomi Ungerer discusses his exile in Ireland, being a target of censorship, and his work's recent resurgence of popularity in the US. ...more

“The fringiest fringe in Fringeville?”

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Over at The Awl, Maud Newton asks how scared we should be of groups like the Hutaree militia, which was recently broken up by the FBI for planning attacks on law enforcement.

On the one hand, she says, “When the Tea Party kicks you out of its massive tent, and neighboring militias dismiss you as a cult, you might just be out there on the fringiest fringe in Fringeville.”

On the other hand, she provides a terrifying catalog of militia-tastic things that are so close to the heart of our government that it almost makes me want to start a conspiracy theory about the conspiracy theorists.

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