Posts Tagged: weekend rumpus roundup

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

In the Saturday Interview, May Cobb talks with Austin-based multi-instrumentalist Guy Forsyth about The Freedom to Fail, his first studio album in six years. In a touching aside about his daughter, Forsyth explains the album title: “…she can only grow to the extent that she reaches for things.” Their discussion is framed by the backdrop of Austin, Texas, the continually metamorphosing “Live Music Capital of the World.”

Then, in a review of the “masterful” and “personal” Blood, Sparrows and Sparrows, Kenji Liu highlights the gradually evolving voice of poet Eugenia Leigh.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, Grant Snider puts us in the right frame of mind and Steven Kraan personifies Sunday.

In the Bay of Fundy, between Maine’s northeast coast and the western shores of Nova Scotia, lies an island called Grand Manan, whose windswept landscape serves as a source of inspiration and meditation for Alison Hawthorne Deming.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Thanksgiving is still three weeks away, but it’s never too early to express our gratitude. MariNaomi shows us how it’s done with a concise list of the things she is thankful for, which includes “the tenacity of young me, who kept at it for so long.”

An excerpt from writer and cartoonist John Dermot Woods’s new “illustrated compendium,” The Baltimore Atrocities, brims with macabre mysteries.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, Diana Whitney reviews Cynthia Cruz’s poetry collection, Wunderkammer, meaning “cabinet of curiosities.” This is a book of “delicious… detail.” Cruz’s poems, Whitney declares, “have a wry sense of humor that tempers the traumas they reveal.” The poet, who was born in Germany, transports readers from Berlin to upstate New York, from death to madness to redemption.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, Grant Snider’s favorite things, in rhyme.

In The Last Book I Loved, Richard Kramer delves into the “determined and effective” Judith Schneiderman’s memoir, I Sang To Survive. A “propulsive drive” lies behind the Auschwitz survivor’s writing. “What I love most about her book,” Kramer writes, “is the joy with which she tells it, the many moments when her words and insights jump off the page, glowing, specific.”

Lastly, in an animated conversation about story writing and storytelling, “that cool girl” Megan Stielstra opens up about her creative process.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First off, Grant Snider unfolds one of our most dogged clichés.

More than one hundred and fourteen years ago, an uprising broke out in China that eventually became known as the Boxer Rebellion. But according to Jennifer Cheng, the movement now occurring in Hong Kong differs fundamentally from that violent, ultra-nationalist Rebellion of the past.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Meet Invincible Eric.

Then, Matthew Daddona reviews Carl Adamshick’s “empathetic” collection, Saint Friend. The poet employs a “smooth and elegiac rhetoric that is more concerned with sonic repetition than it is flawless consistency.” Adamshick’s book is worth a look for its “flair,” its “speed,” and its willingness to experiment with form.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

This Sunday, Ted Wilson turned five. Happy anniversary, Ted!

In the latest “Last Book I Loved,” Michelle King finds a kindred spirit in Sylvia Plath, who, the first time she kissed husband Ted Hughes, allegedly bit his cheek and drew blood.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

The “the stirring, hot-blooded motion” of the poems in Irene McKinney’s collection Have You Had Enough Darkness Yet? is striking, given its posthumous publication. Charlie Atkinson reviews this “curious” and sometimes “playful” examination of mortality, noting the poet’s competence and profound understanding of her topic.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

In response to Dave Eggers’s new book, Your Fathers, Where Are They? And The Prophets, Do They Live For Ever?, Alex Kalamaroff takes us on a guided tour of the “dialogue novel,” a genre where conversation between characters is “the primary or only means of narrative advancement.” Kalamaroff boils the genre down to three sub-categories.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, a little creative encouragement from Grant Snider to jump start August.

Then, in this review, Andrew Fulmer examines Jeff Alessandrelli’s use of the poetic “factoid.” Alessandrelli makes a series of successful allusions in his collection, This Last Time Will Be The First. It is a “contemporarily fresh” collection that deserves our attention, Fulmer argues.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

In the Sunday Interview, Anna March talks with Robin Black about her debut novel, Life Drawing. Black—who also received acclaim for her short story collection, If I Loved You, I Would Tell You This—begins by discussing her approach to writing character.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, “Creative Thinking,” by Grant Snider.

Then, the grandiosity of nature suffuses Ketchum, Idaho, the setting of the Sunday Essay and the place where Ernest Hemingway spent his last days on earth. Author Eileen Shields, who lives part of the year on the same street as the old Hemingway house, offers us a thoughtful meditation on “Papa’s” death and the strangely masculine American mythology of suicide by gun.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

We’ve had a busy couple weekends at the Rumpus lately, and we wanted to make sure nobody missed any of the spectacular essays and book reviews we’ve been posting.

For example, this weekend we reviewed Bradley L. Garrett’s urban-exploration treatise Explore Everything, and Thea Goodman wrote about her complex relationship with a cousin who suffered a severe burn and later overdosed.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Having a social life on weekends is fun, but what if you missed our killer Rumpus weekend features?! No worries, we’ve collected them for you here.

On Saturday, Shawn Andrew Mitchell reviewed Dark Lies the Island by recent Rumpus interviewee Kevin Barry:

In one paragraph a poet-narrator might describe how “the sky had shucked the last of its evening grey to take on an intense purplish tone that was ominous, close-in, biblical” but in the next he announces “Sky is weirdin’ up like I don’t know fucking what.”

Then Margo Rabb wrote a touching tribute to Alice Munro about what the Nobel prize winner, “the only author I’ve ever written a fan letter to,” has meant to her personally throughout her life.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Hope your Thanksgiving was bountiful and your travel experience wasn’t too terrible! Here’s what we had going on on the Rumpus this weekend.

Lydia Kiesling’s review of Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch has stirred up a little controversy, but it’s thoughtful and engaged, we promise:

Donna Tartt is catnip for educated people who want to read entertaining but not difficult things about lofty topics and cosmopolitan people.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Hey. Kid. You wanna buy a weekend Rumpus roundup?

If you missed yesterday’s Sunday Rumpus essay, “Through the Throat” by Ethel Rohan, you’ll want to correct that error immediately. A snippet:

By then Dad was in the hospital six weeks and I had kissed him more times than ever before in my life combined and sometimes joked to my sisters, “If there’s a mother of a miracle and he gets well, he’ll kill us for all these kisses.”

And if you’re in New York or Chicago, don’t forget to check out our events columns for those cities!

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

I know it’s hard, but maybe it’s best if you take a part of your morning to ignore the central emptiness that governs all of our motivations and extrapersonal interactions and read the weekend features.

If you’ve ever wanted to engage in surreal, intricate, and more or less physically impossible meta-nail art, Yumi Sakugawa has curated a helpful guide for you over at Saturday’s comic.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

Christ…brace yourself for an emotionally crippling time with these weekend features. (The pain is worth it! It always is!)

In Saturday’s feature, the tragic end to an interplanetary love story shivers with loss—one of Yumi Sakugawa’s best comics yet.

Sunday’s essay is structured around an experimental narrative in which Jennifer Pastiloff explores themes of possession across various experiences: the generosity of a vagrant stranger, an imagined romance with a fellow actor, a harrowing car accident that results in miracle.

...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

There are no holiday weekends in August, but there are weekend Rumpus roundups.

If you feel like you need a hundred-year-nap, you might relate to Saturday’s comic by Yumi Sakugawa.

And on Sunday, Rob Roberge wrestled with the way fiction wrestles with the impossible complexity of making moral decisions:

But/and it strikes me that most good writing (and here, I’ll put my vote in for “good” being synonymous with ethically complex…) concerns itself with issues of non-conventional morality.

...more