Posts Tagged: weekend rumpus roundup

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Byron F. Aspaas bares his slowly healing scars of communities lost before they were found and countries-turned-battlefields to remind us that our transformations into our true selves are never complete.

And the Rumpus Inaugural Poems project continues on this last weekend of freedom with “& who , this time” by Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib and two poems, “horror movie pitch” and “horror movie pitch 2,” by Eve L.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Leila Aboulela examines time and its tricks in “Pinpricks” for the Saturday Rumpus Essay.

And this weekend, we kicked off our Rumpus Inaugural Poems project with Leila Chatti’s eulogy for every mother’s lost country in “Motherland,” and Kaveh Akbar’s surreal images of reconstructionism in “Poem to a Conqueror.”

Meanwhile, Brandon Hicks shares a very funny new comic, “An Interview with BabyFace McTithead.”

Finally, in Sunday Rumpus Poetry, Faisal Mohyuddin offers us three simple moments of hope amongst riddles of anxiety in complicated times.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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A very happy New Year from everyone at The Rumpus!

First, in the Saturday Essay, Shamala Gallagher thinks about “what counts as truth” in the process of creating your own narrative during times of identity crisis.

And in the Sunday Essay, Peggy Shinner captures a moment of disconnect between a family bound by history, lost in their differences, longing for something they can’t name.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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We hope you had a merry Christmas! Here’s a comic from Brandon Hicks on Santa vs. God.

As Standing Rock quiets and the Water Protectors move to the next phase of resistance, Theodore C. Van Alst, Jr. studies the wašíču, the fat-takers, on the other side of the divide in the Saturday Essay.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Ruby Hansen Murray explores the surreal landscapes of historic Native American locations turned educational tourist hotspots in the Saturday Rumpus Essay, as she journeys with the Osage Nation Historical Preservation Department to Cahokia, the site of an ancient agrarian culture in now-Illinois, among camera-carrying tourists and young field-trippers.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Kaitlin Barker Davis lays bare the grief, and examines the imperfect, often bizarre language, that accompanies a “missed miscarriage.”

And Brandon Hicks shares irreverent bits from his drawing board in “Misc.: Stray Thoughts.”

Then, in the Sunday Essay, Piper J.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In this week’s Saturday Rumpus Essay, Terese Mailhot, our Saturday Rumpus editor, shares rallying words from Cherokee author Barbara Robidoux. Robidoux calls on us to stop walking our beaten trails and take a stand against faux “boy’s club” leaders. This powerful excerpt was originally spoken by Robidoux before a demonstration against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Rumpus Essay, Casandra Lopez threads together the fragments of self-identity, the love of cars her father and brother were born with, and a lost soul. Through the retelling of the death of her younger brother, Lopez explores the lasting wounds it caused for her and for her family, and how it feels to be related to the dead—it’s a brokenness that requires years of care and love—much like a beat-up car—to heal.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in Rumpus Saturday Fiction, Sherman Alexie’s shares three short stories—”Fixed Income,” “Honor Society,” and “Valediction”—that all offer his trademark whimsy and insight into the human condition. Three different teenagers struggle with poverty, endemic racism, and social exclusion, and must depend upon themselves to make the right choices in difficult moral situations.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in Saturday Rumpus Poetry, Connie Voisine shares three new poems. Body shaming is the subject of “Shameful,” in which the speaker considers modeling herself after someone else, “like a person on TV,” but she only watches English programs “where actors have yellowish/teeth and red eyes.” The physical body, here, is “an artichoke.” Voisine exposes the visceral experience of motherhood with analogy and active, surprising language in “No, Dog” and tackles the mysterious and the mythological in “Self Portrait as Sphinx.”

Then, in the Sunday Essay, Deborah Jackson Taffa tells the story of returning with her children to the Yuma Nation reservation after fifteen years away, and the memories of struggle and exploitation that their visit dredges up.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Michaelsun Stonesweat Knapp and Tommy Pico discuss Pico’s book-length poem, IRL, and its themes of temporality, Indiginous identity, and lyrical humor. IRL (which stands for ‘in real life’) reflects a “terrifying” and cathartic creative process in which Pico churned out new material four days a week and spent Fridays aggressively editing.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Sasha LaPointe meditates on the “language of trauma” in the Saturday Essay. An abusive experience from her childhood manifests itself in strange images of floating boats, images that she struggles to express in writing. LaPointe delves into the psychology of dissociation and discovers a wellspring of strength coming from her Native heritage and its oral histories.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Helga Schimkat talks to author Eden Robinson about silencing the inner voice of criticism. Robinson, whose award-winning novel Monkey Beach is set in British Columbia, emphasizes the sensory and emotional role of home in her work, saying, “Writing about your community is difficult for any writer.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Chip Livingston recounts his transformational experiences with Reiki and alternative healing practices in the Saturday Essay. A shocking recording of a tarot reading empowers Livingston to feel hope again for his ailing lover, Ash, who is HIV positive. Then, Livingston learns a new way of healing at a Native American conference that complements his tarot reading.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Laura Da’ laments the near-eradication of the Shawnee language. Da’ provides a litany of broken treaties, each one an “artifact of unimaginable suffering,” and attempts to redefine the treaty for herself in today’s world.

Then, industrious author Christine Sneed talks to Floyd Skloot in the Sunday Interview.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Penny Perkins speaks with Ramona Ausubel about Ausubel’s latest novel, Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty, her previous collections, and “the ways that stories change the real chemistry of the world.”

Then, Jeff Lennon reviews Cynthia Cruz’s “swirling” fourth poetry collection, How The End Begins.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, the “luminous” poetry of Circe Maia takes center stage in the Saturday Interview. Chip Livingston talks to writer and teacher Jesse Lee Kercheval about her ongoing work translating Uruguayan poetry, much of which is written and performed in Montevideo, where “everyone is connected in one way or another.”

Meanwhile, Brandon Hicks pokes fun at didactic barflies in “The Bar Monologues.”

Lastly, in the Sunday Essay, Lea Page delves into fraught family dynamics surrounding her mother, her sister, Toni, and her nephew, after Toni’s husband suffers brain damage in a car accident.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Michael Wasson’s imagistic prose poetry fills the Saturday Essay. Wasson’s dreamlike narrative describes a first day of school from his childhood. Wasson recalls the teacher taking attendance, calling out, “who’s missing?” The question launches a lyrical investigation of the author’s memory and identity.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Tyrese L. Coleman talks with author Leslie Pietrzyk about her award-winning 2015 collection, This Angel On My Chest, and its relationship with real life events. The author explains her approach to writing about personal tragedy, which is “to write the ‘true’ things until the truth wasn’t as interesting as what I could make up.”

Meanwhile, in “Big Ideas, Little Cartoons,” Brandon Hicks breaks down the most difficult topics into bite-sized illustrated aphorisms.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Michelle Marie Wallace chats with two Bay Area writers-turned-visual artists, Cristina García and Truong Tran, in the Saturday Interview. García and Tran share their inspirations and the impetus that led each to make visual art after spending many years developing their writing.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Terese Marie Mailhot considers the strange and tragic ways life wounds Native American women. She remembers running away from her home, the reservation. “Native women walk alone from the dances of their youth into homes they don’t know for the chance to be away,” she writes.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Interview, Randall Tyrone talks with writer Keith Newton about his innovative chapbook, A Week of Kindness, which reflects Newton’s fascination with surrealist Max Ernst’s 1933 “collage novel” Une semaine de bonté. Newton shares thoughtful views on organized religion, art as a response to fraying societal bonds, and his childhood and adolescence as a member of a cult.

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