Posts Tagged: weekend rumpus roundup

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks compares a nostalgic past with a scary future in “When I Was A Kid… A Personal Essay.”

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Josie Pickens tries to reconcile the real Bill Cosby with the one we’ve come to admire from The Cosby Show and Fat Albert.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Gila Lyons laments Asif Kapadia’s portrayal of Amy Winehouse in the documentary, Amy, and contrasts the film with the recent biopic of Kurt Cobain. The gender-based double standard is alive and well here. Women are still being objectified and martyred by the media.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks takes an irreverent look at economic ironies in “Competitive Marketplace.”

Then, setting is paramount in the Saturday Rumpus Review of Antonio Ruizpalacio’s film, Gueros. The director’s vision of Mexico City, writes Alex Norcia, symbolizes “Güeros’s struggling and disaffected youths, an external rendering of what’s most internal.” Its characters fight to create meaning for their lives in a landscape that resists them at every turn.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, the Rumpus exclusive video premiere of The Size Queens’s To The Country.

Then, in the Saturday Review of Mad Max: Fury Road, Devin O’Neill explores the movie’s seeds of feminist thought. Though the film is undeniably brutal and violent, O’Neill highlights its anti-patriarchal implications.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks takes an illustrative look at a few hypothetical situations.

And in the Saturday interview, Anna March talks with Salon editor and author Sarah Hepola about alcoholism and the distorted worldview that comes along with it. Hepola talks movingly about her blackouts, which became the “through line” in her memoir of the same name.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks finds the essence of military conflict in his comic, “War.”

Then, Arielle Bernstein talks to self-proclaimed “anti-racist feminist” Tamara Winfrey-Harris in the Saturday Interview. Winfrey-Harris’s blog, What Tami Said, provides some of the material for an essay collection due out this July.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, the topic of artificial intelligence is the focus of drama in the Saturday Review of Ex Machina. Joe Sacksteder describes the “murky moral terrain” of the film, which follows an unwitting participant in a modern-day mad scientist’s experimentations.

Then, in the Sunday Essay, Thea Goodman shares a difficult story of harassment from her teenage years.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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For National Poetry Month Days 25 & 26, Christian Anton Gerard and Ada Limon provide us with poems of love and luck.

Then, Sean Donovan has good things to say in his Saturday Review of the film It Follows, a “clever” tribute to John Carpenter and the horror cinema of the 80s.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Scott Borchert wonders about the symbiosis of author James Agee and folklorist Harry Smith. Though it is unclear if they met in New York during the 1950s, “their works do converge —in spirit, perhaps, and not chronologically.” The “fever-dream” of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men complements the nightmarish quality of Smith’s landmark folk music compilation.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Star Trek II, The Wrath of Khan, was Jen Girdish’s first brush with Leonard Nimoy’s mortality. Nimoy’s role as the famously stoic Spock captures Girdish’s attention in the Saturday Essay and serves as a nostalgic lens through which she examines her late father’s life.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Julie Marie Wade points to Tod Marshall’s skillful use of call and response in his new poetry collection, Bugle. The theme of mortality punctuates this “fierce” and “stunning” book. Marshall’s speaker, Wade writes, “contemplates what we think we know about nature, music, human frailty, and human triumph.”

Meanwhile, The Internet is “the great, depressing equalizer,” admits writer and collaborator Jacob Wren.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, sacrifice is the key to artistic growth in Grant Snider’s “Creative Processor.”

And in the Saturday Essay, Amanda Miska realizes she is making the object of her love into a “myth,” into “the version of the story that [she] wanted to believe.” Framed by the constant presence of social media, Miska analyzes the motivation behind Internet “stalking”—the desire to win.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Grant Snider provides some (mostly) encouraging words in “One Page At A Time.”

Prompted by author Colleen McCullough’s shallow-minded obituary in the Guardian, Tabitha Blankenbiller uses the Saturday Essay for introspection. The prevailing views of women’s bodies come under the microscope when Blankenbiller reflects on her experience in a church support group for women trying to lose weight.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Kenny Ng evaluates the groundbreaking show Transparent and its attempt to raise awareness of transgender and genderqueer identities. In the show, Arrested Development’s Jeffrey Tambor plays Mort, a lifelong family man who comes out as a transgender women named Maura.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Gentrification, and analogies for it, are the focus of Mary Biddinger’s poetry collection A Sunny Place With Adequate Water, reviewed by Danielle Susi. The inhumanity of coin-operated machinery serves as a theme. Moments of “lucidity” make these poems “a little weird, a little quirky, and a lot beautiful.”

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Tara Isabella Burton looks back on her teenage relationship with the groundbreaking television drama Gilmore Girls and its eerie mimicry of her own life.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Grant Snider’s “Inferiority Complex” explores the inner recesses of consciousness.

Then, Louise Fabiani reviews Scarlett Johansson’s scary sci-fi film, Under the Skin, which “weasels its way into your reptilian brain from its first baffling frames.” Director Jonathan Glazer does a nice job of getting the audience on Johansson’s side, even as she beckons unwitting men to their deaths.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday essay, “Broken Bird: Reflections on The Upside of Anger,” Kathryn Buckley notes similarities between the film, starring Keri Russell, and her own experiences—both she and Russell’s character struggled with anorexia. When Buckley finds herself in an MFA program, something clicks.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Grant Snider considers New Year’s resolutions in his inimitable way.

Then, Barbara Berman draws a connection between two recent poetry collections—famous German playwright Bertold Brecht’s posthumous Love Poems and The Book of Scented Things: 100 Contemporary Poems About Perfume, edited by Jehanne Dubrow and Lindsay Lusby.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Julie Marie Wade reviews the “solar system” of Kimberly Burwick’s poetry collection, Good Night Brother. The son—or “sun”—in the title “burns everyone and everything it touches.” He/it “has gone the way of the supernova.” This lovable, yet hard-to-love character seduces the reader with the promise of the ineffable.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, what if your Christmas tree ornaments could tweet.

Then, in the Saturday film review of Wildthe film adaptation of Dear Sugar columnist Cheryl Strayed’s eponymous novel—Kenny Ng praises Strayed’s “realness” and “punk aesthetic” while tempering expectations for the film.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Devin O’Neill considers the dual nature of the male feminist, looking back not-so-fondly on the desire to “lash out” against an unforgiving world during high school and junior high. O’Neill used “nerd” and “goth” identities to cope with the anxiety of confronting gender norms.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, say hello to our new Saturday media editor, Arielle Bernstein!

Then, in “All The World’s A Stage,” Grant Snider neatly illustrates our inner performer.

Poet Kent Shaw marvels at the “glandular muscularity” of water as a theme in Harmony Holiday’s dual book, A Famous Blues/Go Find Your Father.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Kristina Marie Darling’s poetry collection, Fortress, is “image-rich” and wonderfully allusive. The setting is the famously decadent palace of Versailles. Like the film Marie Antoinette, “Darling’s book is simultaneously excess and desolation,” writes Sandra Marchetti. White spaces are used strategically in this “lush” book of poems.

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