Posts Tagged: weekend rumpus roundup

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, we close out National Poetry Month with Sophie Klahr breaking down literary conventions in “Slant,” and Sandra Simonds offering two powerful poems about sexuality and shame.

Meanwhile, Brandon Hicks illustrates what he has learned from famous author’s photos.

Then, in the Saturday Interview with Carol Edelman Warrior, poet and playwright Storme Webber says that “we’re all traveling on this Earth.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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To kick things off, Brandon Hicks offers us the hilarious illustrated life story of a “Born Failure.”

Then, National Poetry Month continues at The Rumpus. First, Amanda Deutch’s “Island Factory” uses couplets to tell a tragic story of immigrant labor in Long Island City.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, National Poetry Month at The Rumpus continues with Carrie Murphy’s “Beauty Work” and two poems from Amaud Johnson.

Next, a harrowing tale of addiction and related heart disease from Paul Vega in the Saturday Essay. Vega’s innovative form helps to create an understated tone in his description of his rehabilitation, and offers an opportunity for honesty that is long-overdue.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Tyrese L. Coleman unearths the history behind her surname and the results of a DNA test. The results say she is 69% African, 33% originating from Benin, 29% European, and less than 2% Asian. Coleman digs deeper and considers the likelihood of having descending from slaves and their slaveholders, imperialists and the subjected, both the winners and losers in our history books.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, in the Saturday Essay, Cindy Lamothe writes about Central American street gangs, folklore, and how “more than a decade’s worth of war [has] left El Salvador in an aggressive tailspin of poverty and violence.”

Then, Ryan Werner reviews poet Katie Schmid’s collection, forget me / hit me / let me drink great quantities of clear, evil liquor, writing that Schmid’s poems are “a love letter, one that reaches out in blind bravery to the isolated bittersweetness of the Midwest and the women who circle around—or are circled around by—manhood.”

Finally, in the Sunday Essay, Ariel Gore offers us a beautiful, if heart-rending, essay about cycles of violence as she takes us from her childhood with a troubled father to the present, where she finds herself raising a child of her own with another troubled father in, and out, of the picture.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks exercises his satirical muscle in “The Cartoonists: Profiles.”

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Steven D. Howe bravely exposes his relationship with his father to the light, a relationship bruised by alcoholism and Howe’s own fear of perpetuating the cycle of addiction.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, poet Christina Stoddard discusses her debut collection, Hive, with Renee Sims in the Saturday Interview. Violence and brutality in the Pacific Northwest is the topic of this sometimes-startling book. Stoddard faces the reality of violence with an unblinking gaze.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, National Book Award finalist Angela Flournoy talks with Deesha Philyaw in the Saturday Interview. They discuss themes pertinent to Detroit, the setting of Flournoy’s book, The Turner House. Some include housing discrimination, hip-hop, respectability politics, and the challenges of writing truthfully about the African American experience in that storied and troubled city.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks unveils a triptych of “Quick-Takes” illustrating his irreverent views on nature, famous trees, and the rapture.

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Ashley Inguanta mourns for her best friend who passed away years ago. The two of them met as children and grew up together in a small town, sharing in the milestones of adolescence.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Lisa Borders describes moving to a small community in southern New Jersey at thirteen. It’s the sort of place where everyone knows the difference between “good” and “bad” families. This dynamic reminds Borders of Steven Avery, the embattled subject of the popular Netflix documentary series, Making A Murderer, in turn, Avery reminds Borders of a character in her own novel, The Fifty-First State, and the real-life man who inspired him.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks brings us an illustrated retrospective of the works of Franklin “Boobs & Butt” Barber.

Then, in the Saturday Rumpus Review of Todd Haynes’s movie Carol, Sean Donovan considers how this new film fits into Haynes’s other works that focus on the 1950s, writing, “Until Carol, Haynes’s examination of queer sexuality and fifties culture has been rooted in detached, postmodern explorations of the fifties.” He concludes that, “perhaps Carol is the fifties, for real this time.”

Meanwhile, Heather Partington reviews Rus Like Everyone Else, Bette Adriaanse’s debut novel from Unnamed Press.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In the Saturday Essay, Anna March takes an unflinching look at the historical film Suffragette, which attempts to portray the women who took part in the suffrage movement during the early 1900s. While the film does draw attention to feminist successes, it glosses over the flaws of early activists, such as Susan B.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks criticizes parental hypocrisy in “Colorful Language.”

Meanwhile, in the Saturday Review, Joe Sacksteder offers a detailed portrait of the film 99 Homes, by director Ramin Bahrani. The 2008 mortgage crisis serves as the backdrop of a fraught storyline that brings together its protagonist, a victim of the recession, and antagonist, the real estate broker who caused his eviction.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks personifies a crucial part of all stories in “The End: A Biography.

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Lisa Ellison recalls the comforting presence of Molly Ringwald on her television screen alongside difficult memories of her mother’s drug and alcohol addiction.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks’s most recent comic provides a guidepost for the maturing male artist.

Then, in a cutting Saturday Essay, Eileen G’Sell exposes the forward-looking and regressive trends in advertising. Though Progressive’s fully-clothed and “offbeat” spokeswoman, “Flo,” is a step in the right direction, other advertisers seem to be balking.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In a focused and engaging Saturday Interview, Arielle Bernstein talks to essayist Karrie Higgins—the author of a 2015 Best American Essay titled “Strange Flowers”—about the generative quality of chaos within the creative process. Higgins points to the influence of forensic science on her approach.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Caroline Smith writes about parenthood and television in the Saturday Essay. The wildly popular AMC drama Mad Men provides a thematic frame for Smith’s own foray into marriage and motherhood. She even teaches a college writing course on the television show, allowing her to analyze the “messiness” of Mad Men and real life.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks gives us “Leonard: The Dad From A Different Generation.”

Next, Gayle Brandeis offers a personal and insightful portrait of female body image in the Saturday Essay, “Thunder, Thighs.” Before Brandeis’s own view of her thighs was changed forever, they were her “friends,” her “freedom.” After much introspection, Brandeis learns strategies for coping with the shame imposed on her from outside.

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