Posts Tagged: wired

The Company Tub

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If you have ever enjoyed playing an early Nintendo arcade game, chances are you’ve enjoyed the brain fruit Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto grew while soaking in the company bathtub, Chris Kohler reports for WIRED. “At night when nobody was around, you could hang out there for a long time. It totally saved me,” Miyamoto said of the […]

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GoDefundMe

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There’s no denying that crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo have brought resources to artists and causes that wouldn’t have found support a decade ago. However, according to Emma Hoffman at WIRED, a dark side is emerging. Everything—from academic research projects, to elementary school classes, to parks and recreation departments—is seen as crowdfundable, meaning that […]

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Photographing Crime

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It’s a paradox that many of the show’s images are strangely striking even if the crimes they represent are horrifying. Joseph Stalin had at least 750,000 executed between 1937 and 1938. A photographer made a portrait before each execution, shooting the condemned from the front and the side—something the Khmer Rouge did, too. The images […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Austin Bunn

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Austin Bunn talks about his new story collection, The Brink, his latest script for a short film, In the Hollow, working in multiple mediums, and why some novels read like early drafts of screenplays.

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Word of the Day: Amphigory

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(n.); a nonsense verse; specifically, a poem designed to look and sound good, but which has no meaning upon closer reading; from the French amphigouri. “Just imagine a typeface that could inspire empathy inherently based on the softness of a letter’s apex or by increasing or decreasing negative space in characters.” –Liz Stinson, “Can Typography […]

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Camping Out at Walmart

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Because Walmart has a company policy letting people park their cars in its lots overnight, it’s possible to find travelers, long-term campers, and even small communities of people living there. Wired highlights a series of portraits of people staying in the parking lot of a Walmart in Flagstaff, Arizona, taken by photographer Nolan Conway. From […]

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The Passage of Ideas

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Every day, we collectively produce millions of books’ worth of writing. Globally we send 154.6 billion emails, more than 400 million tweets, and over 1 million blog posts and around 2 million blog comments on WordPress. On Facebook, we post about 16 billion words. Altogether, we compose some 3.6 trillion words every day on email […]

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A New Way to Read Comics

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Only a small percentage of blind people commonly use Braille—and that number drops even further when it comes to reading comic books. With a new Braille-based comic book, Danish designer Phillipp Meyer may have overcome some of the limitations that prevent the visually impaired from enjoying sequential art. Instead of merely raising the lines on […]

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250-year-old Secret Text Decoded

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New technological advances have allowed researchers into an ancient world of secret texts that once seemed nearly impossible to decode. Noah Shachtman’s article in Wired, titled “They Cracked This 250-Year-Old Code, and Found a Secret Society Inside,” explores how new computer generated algorithms are opening doors into secret societies. Shachtman writes:

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The Silent History and the Evolution of the E-Book

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At Wired, Shoshana Berger profiles designer, programmer, and Rumpus contributor Russell Quinn, whose new project, The Silent History, will begin its serial publication soon. The e-book is divided into six parts, each part then divided into smaller, ten to fifteen minute “episodes”, which will be delivered wirelessly to the readers device every weekday for a month. The […]

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Letters for Kids Love

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Wired wrote about Letters for Kids, our newly-launched subscription service akin to Letters in the Mail — but for youngsters. We agree wholeheartedly with Wired’s endorsement: “If your child has bookish tendencies, or if you’d like to encourage the development of such tendencies, this is worth a look.” Thanks, Wired, we love you back!

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Our Brains On Art

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“While Rembrandt was an astonishingly talented artist, our response to his art is conditioned by all sorts of variables that have nothing to do with oil paint. Many of these variables are capable of distorting our perceptions, so that we imagine differences that don’t actually exist; the verdict of art history warps what we see.” […]

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Guillermo del Toro Interview

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Wired interviews Guillermo del Toro, whose co-authored vampire book trilogy concluded with last month’s publication of Night Eternal. Del Toro discusses science and religion; vampire myths and folklore; and his current projects, one of which is a video game. “I feel like science and religion are like a Möbius strip. When you dig deep enough […]

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New School

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Wired’s got an article on technologically-informed education—Khan Academy, an educational website in which, “Students, or anyone interested enough to surf by, can watch some 2,400 videos in which the site’s founder, Salman Khan, chattily discusses principles of math, science, and economics.” This website ostensibly aids in solving the “middle of the class teaching,” that neglects […]

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Alan Moore on Superheroes

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Actually, there’s a lot more to this interview with Alan Moore than just his view on superheroes–it’s largely about The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: 1969, which should be released next month–but I really enjoyed this bit on the problem with today’s superheroes. “I do have a feeling, particularly in this last decade, that some of […]

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Mass Extinction

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“It could happen again…” There is some evidence that the onset of the end-Triassic mass extinction—which occurred 200 million years ago and wiped out at least half of all living species—may have been much more sudden that previously believed. And the culprit? Something that concerns scientists about today’s rising temperatures: the release of methane in […]

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5 for Print

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Wired has 5 reasons why E-books cannot replace print. Besides the tech-related qualms (like books being divided by app, not allowing readers to see all their books in one place), problems like “an unfinished e-book isn’t a constant reminder to finish reading it,” make the list. Because even the techy people can’t resist all the […]

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Depressed Creativity? Sort Of.

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When Martin Heidegger wrote his gargantuan Magnus opus, Being and Time, he posited that it was Angst, the fundamental human condition, that brought us into the most authentic relationship with our selves and our surroundings. Angst, for Heidegger, is caused by coming face-to-face with the inevitability of our own death and is life in the […]

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The Ultimate in Recycling

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It’s just a coincidence that I’ll be teaching the Wendell Berry poem “Enriching the Earth” tomorrow, a poem which ends with the lines “And so what was heaviest / and most mute is at last raised up into song,” but I couldn’t help but think of Berry’s sentiment about the body being of use after […]

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What if the Facebook privacy changes are a good thing?

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Fred Vogelstein, writing for the Wired blog Epicenter, looks at Facebook’s history on privacy, and points out that we shouldn’t really be shocked at what Mark Zuckerberg is doing. “Indeed, Zuckerberg’s challenges to conventional thinking about online privacy have become so predictable, it’s starting to resemble Moore’s Law. That bet — that the number of […]

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