Posts Tagged: women

Kill Them All

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Arielle Bernstein, Rumpus Film/TV/Media and Saturday Editor, writes about Rihanna, bitches, and blood over at Salon:

Women are raised on images of toxic masculinity just like the men around us are. Many of us also played “Grand Theft Auto” and watched great films featuring tons of sexualized violence against women: “Last Tango in Paris,” “A Clockwork Orange,” “Goodfellas,” “Wolf of Wall Street” —the list goes on and on.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Sarah Hepola

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Editor and writer Sarah Hepola talks about her new memoir Blackout, how gender affects alcoholism, writing about female friendships, and the writers who've influenced her. ...more

The Pause That Does Not Refresh

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You hear a lot about hot flashes, but hot flashes are the least of it, totally inconsequential in every way: you get as hot as a steam iron at odd moments – so what? The media would have you believe that hot flashes are the single most significant symptom toward which you should direct your attention and businesses their products, but when I think of menopause I don’t think of hot flashes; I am not here to talk about hot flashes.

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The Rumpus Interview with Women in Clothes

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The Rumpus speaks to Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, and Leanne Shapton about Women in Clothes, a new collection of essays and art on the intricacies of femininity and clothing choices. ...more

VIDA Launches Roundtable Discussion Series

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VIDA is launching a new roundtable discussion series on issues in writing by women on June 2nd at Housing Works Bookstore in Manhattan. The event is the first of a series that will take place every fall and winter/spring. This time, they conversation centers on how women write about other women, featuring a panel including Jill Lepore, Rebecca Mead, Salamishah Tillet, and Ruth Franklin.

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Vela Magazine Lists the Unlisted

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As part of its ongoing battle to get women writers the recognition they deserve, Vela has put together a “list of women writers of various forms of creative nonfiction that future list-makers and anthologists…might peruse and thereby make their “bests” and “greats” better and greater, their collections more representative of the world we live in.”

Here’s “The Unlisted List” in all its glory!

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Down with Women’s Stories, Up with Stories about Women

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I am not tired of stories about women’s lives, stories that tell me something real about how a particular woman thinks or works or loves. But I am tired of “women’s stories,” stories that are supposed to be about a problem that afflicts “women.”

Anna North has a terrific essay up at Salon about the endless conveyor belt of “women’s stories” expressing uneasiness with women who have casual sex or prioritize careers over marriage.

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Reductress: Women’s News. Feminized.

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In lieu of a “Funny Women” column today, please read all of Reductress, a new satirical women’s web magazine like The Onion that “tells the stories of real women, written by real women, for other real women who like to read about women.” At last, a news magazine that “that empower[s] women with feminine ideas, feminine emotions, and feminine products.”

Reductress “parodies woman-focused marketing and the consumer identity built around it, taking on the perk and patronizing tone that saturates online media today.

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Sorry, Fellas, You’re Not That Funny

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Plenty of people, from Christopher Hitchens to Adam Carolla, have made the assertion that women aren’t funny.

You can probably guess that we at the Rumpus disagree, since we have a whole feature devoted to Funny Women (plus we live in the real world, rather than Misogynist Fantasyland, where women have never, ever rejected Christopher Hitchens or Adam Carolla, and always laugh at their jokes).

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Thoughts on Gender from A “Manic Depressive Nightmare Girl”

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Girls rule, etcetera. But men are not afraid of girls. Girls never did and don’t now “run the world,” and if we believe Bey when she sings so, it’s only because she’s a woman.

For Vice, Sarah Nicole Prickett writes a provocative piece about the value of being a bitch in a world where women often slip into the infantilized, genteel roles of “girl” and “lady.”

Whether you agree with all her points or not, it’s an exhilarating read.

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