Posts Tagged: women

VIDA Launches Roundtable Discussion Series

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VIDA is launching a new roundtable discussion series on issues in writing by women on June 2nd at Housing Works Bookstore in Manhattan. The event is the first of a series that will take place every fall and winter/spring. This time, they conversation centers on how women write about other women, featuring a panel including Jill Lepore, Rebecca Mead, Salamishah Tillet, and Ruth Franklin.

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Vela Magazine Lists the Unlisted

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As part of its ongoing battle to get women writers the recognition they deserve, Vela has put together a ”list of women writers of various forms of creative nonfiction that future list-makers and anthologists…might peruse and thereby make their “bests” and “greats” better and greater, their collections more representative of the world we live in.”

Here’s “The Unlisted List” in all its glory!

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Down with Women’s Stories, Up with Stories about Women

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I am not tired of stories about women’s lives, stories that tell me something real about how a particular woman thinks or works or loves. But I am tired of “women’s stories,” stories that are supposed to be about a problem that afflicts “women.”

Anna North has a terrific essay up at Salon about the endless conveyor belt of “women’s stories” expressing uneasiness with women who have casual sex or prioritize careers over marriage.

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Reductress: Women’s News. Feminized.

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In lieu of a “Funny Women” column today, please read all of Reductress, a new satirical women’s web magazine like The Onion that “tells the stories of real women, written by real women, for other real women who like to read about women.” At last, a news magazine that “that empower[s] women with feminine ideas, feminine emotions, and feminine products.”

Reductress “parodies woman-focused marketing and the consumer identity built around it, taking on the perk and patronizing tone that saturates online media today.

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Sorry, Fellas, You’re Not That Funny

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Plenty of people, from Christopher Hitchens to Adam Carolla, have made the assertion that women aren’t funny.

You can probably guess that we at the Rumpus disagree, since we have a whole feature devoted to Funny Women (plus we live in the real world, rather than Misogynist Fantasyland, where women have never, ever rejected Christopher Hitchens or Adam Carolla, and always laugh at their jokes).

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Thoughts on Gender from A “Manic Depressive Nightmare Girl”

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Girls rule, etcetera. But men are not afraid of girls. Girls never did and don’t now “run the world,” and if we believe Bey when she sings so, it’s only because she’s a woman.

For Vice, Sarah Nicole Prickett writes a provocative piece about the value of being a bitch in a world where women often slip into the infantilized, genteel roles of “girl” and “lady.”

Whether you agree with all her points or not, it’s an exhilarating read.

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King Revokes Lashings

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“Although there has been no official confirmation of the ruling, Princess Amira al-Taweel, wife of the Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, tweeted: ‘Thank God, the lashing of [Shaima] is cancelled. Thanks to our beloved king. I am sure all Saudi women will be so happy, I know I am.’

King Abdullah has revoked what would have been the first legal punishment of ten lashings to a woman for driving (announced Tuesday).

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10 Lashes for Driving

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“‘How come women get flogged for driving while the maximum penalty for a traffic violation is a fine, not lashes?’ Zein el-Abydeen said. ‘Even the Prophet (Muhammad’s) wives were riding camels and horses because these were the only means of transportation.’”

Two days ago we posted an article on Saudi Arabian women gaining the right to vote, but today a Saudi woman has been “sentenced to 10 lashes for driving a car.”

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Obscured Greatness

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Bookslut zeroes in on the seemingly perpetual obscurity of women’s work in the arts. Looking at artists like Lee Krasner, Leonor Fini, and Mina Loy,—the spaces and roles that they were pushed into, along with the often intangible forms of sexism confronted—the piece wonders how to “restore women to the historical record without getting out a glue stick and pasting some women into History of Art?”

“Greatness does need a little nurturing, a little structure and room to try and fail.

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Percival Everett on Franzen, Sexism and The Great American Novel

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“I do not believe that apparent authoritative literary voices of validation would ever make such a grand claim about a novel written by a woman.  I say this because I believe there are many novels by women that are about the same sort of world as presented in Freedom.  Sadly, the culture usually calls these books domestic or family sagas.  Are the novels of Anne Tyler, Marilynne Robinson and Mona Simpson any less white and middle “American” than Franzen”

At VIDA, author Percival Everett explores the big assumptions and unpsoken prejudices behind Great American Novels (like Freedom.) (Via)

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Politics Sunday

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Gangland tours of LA, with one helluva waiver.

In New Orleans, what happens when sex workers are prosecuted as sex offenders.

A brilliantly written profile of a sniper.

“(M)y grandmother’s feet were bound in China, and there were people here in the U.S. who said, “This is horrific.” And there were people in China who said, “This is horrific.” I am so glad they said it was horrific.

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Elle et Elle

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“Excluding men and showing only women is a revolutionary gesture of affirmative action. But the museum is avant-garde. It’s part of the Centre Pompidou culture to do things differently. And we like a lot of drama. This is going to be dramatic in a big way.” The Pompidou is preparing for a year without men.

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