Posts Tagged: writers of color

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tamiko Nimura

By

Tamiko Nimura talks about the influence of history, memory, and silence on her work; creating a private MFA for herself; and writing a generational memoir. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #81: Chanelle Benz

By

Chanelle Benz’s debut collection, The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead, is filled with characters often facing a moral crossroads. The stories contain the unexpected, like a classic Western complete with local brothel as well as a gothic tale.

...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Angie Thomas

By

Angie Thomas discusses her debut novel, The Hate U Give, landing an agent on Twitter, and why she trusts teenagers more than the publishing industry. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

By

To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Yona Harvey

By

Yona Harvey talks about her path to becoming a poet, Winnie Mandela as an artistic inspiration, and what it means to write more publicly. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

By

Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose. ...more

Multitudes: Policing Black Art

By

Editors and producers skin my art and wrap my entire face with it, asking me to write and read in Black face. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Clarence Major

By

Clarence Major discusses his new collection Chicago Heat and Other Stories, the artist's role in politics, Donald Trump and race relations, and Paris in the good old days. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

By

Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

By

Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

Hands Off

By

Writer-actor-comedian Phoebe Robinson’s debut essay collection is You Can’t Touch My Hair: and Other Things I Still Have to Explain. As Janice Roshalle Littlejohn writes for the LARB blog, “Her writing is relatable and woke, confronting racism and how to cope with white guilt, feminism and female issues, and America’s problematic relationship with black hair.” Robinson herself says, “Part of the reason I wanted to write this book is because when it comes to matters of race, it’s usually just white men talking to black men.”

...more

Telling, Not Showing

By

As I processed a dominant Euro-American writing pedagogy from the perspective of an aspiring fiction writer and an immigrant critic of color, I couldn’t stop wondering: are we, in 21st-century America, overvaluing a sight-based approach to storytelling? And could this be another case of cultural particularity masquerading itself as universal taste?

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

By

Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother. ...more

A Convergence of Selves

By

In an illuminating interview with Claire Schwartz for Guernica, writer Kai Cheng Thom discusses activism, the unique intersections felt by people of color in the queer community, consensual behavior, trauma, and the immigrant experience. It’s a lot of ground to cover, and in doing so she reveals the convergence of all these areas of concern into a singular identity she’s had to construct for herself:

When you begin to define yourself as a queer person of color (qpoc) and transgender or transsexual and of color, you have to, in a sense, give birth to that.

...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Jaquira Díaz

By

Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Cole Lavalais

By

Cole Lavalais discusses her debut novel, Summer of the Cicadas, why she’s a huge fan of outlining, and the importance of dedicated communities for black writers. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tania James

By

Tania James discusses her most recent novel, The Tusk That Did the Damage, the challenges of writing an elephant narrator, and the moment when she knew she could be a writer. ...more

Heal Together

By

The Internet may have irreversibly altered the forms activism takes, but there is still room for change. Christopher Soto reflects on activist frameworks used in 2015 and offers their strategies for working toward a more inclusive poetry community in the future:

I believe in critical conversations with my community, I believe in doing rehabilitative work for my community, I believe in repercussions but not in punishment.

...more

The Conversation: Jayson Smith and A. H. Jerriod Avant

By

My responsibility is to not be negligent and cause unnecessary harm. To a listener or reader. My allegiance is only to truth. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Vivian Lee

By

As an editor of color, one advantage I have is that writers of color are comfortable knowing I’m not asking for edits to artificially enhance or to cover up their race. It’s not weird to me that their characters look like them. ...more

The Conversation: Jeremy Clark and Thiahera Nurse

By

I’m thinking about the difference between “I stay somewhere” and “I live somewhere.” ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

By

Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Kaitlyn Greenidge

By

Kaitlyn Greenidge discusses her debut novel, We Love You, Charlie Freeman, siblinghood and sisterhood, and finding a group to call “my people” in the larger literary world. ...more