Posts Tagged: writers of color

Building a Black Literary Movement

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The New York Times Magazine profiles editor Chris Jackson and how he’s building a literary movement for writers of color:

‘‘The great tradition of black art, generally,’’ he started again, ‘‘is the ability—unlike American art in general—to tell the truth. Because it was formed around the great American poison, the thing that poisoned American consciousness and behavior: racism.

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Publishing on Coffee Sleeves

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Artmaking is a particularly human occupation. It deserves celebrating in small and big ways.

Following the trend of microfiction on Chipotle bags and short story vending machines, a new endeavor from Coffee House Press called Coffee Sleeve Conversations is setting out to print works specifically from writers of color on coffee sleeves in the hopes of giving exposure to underrepresented voices and creating more diverse conversations.

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

Judging the Judges

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This year’s judges of the National Book Award seem to agree that women’s nonfiction writing is abundant and prize-worthy. The 2015 nonfiction longlist includes seven female-authored books, out of 10, the largest percentage of female nominees in the prize’s history. The longlist also contains two books by people of color, compared to last year’s one.

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Toward A More Colorful Masthead

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A new, work-in-progress database of contemporary writers of color created by Durga Chew-Bose, Jazmine Hughes, Vijith Assar, and Buster Bylander aims “to create more visibility for writers of color, ease their access to publications, and build a platform that is both easy for editors to use and accurately represents the writers.”

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UK Publishing is Racist, Too

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The Writing the Future report . . . found that the “best chance of publication” for a black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) writer was to write literary fiction conforming to a stereotypical view of their communities, addressing topics such as “racism, colonialism or post-colonialism as if these were the primary concerns of all BAME people.”

On the heels of the depressing statistics of the first-ever Women of Color VIDA Count, the UK’s Writing the Future report reveals that things aren’t any better for writers of color across the pond.

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Diverse Books by the Numbers

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Over at FiveThirtyEight, Amy Rothschild explores the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign, and the many strategies advocates are using to make a lasting change in the landscape of children’s literature. While 2014 showed a hopeful bump in books penned by and depicting people of color, institutional challenges will likely make change a slow process; Rothschild cites an overwhelmingly white publishing industry, executives dubious of the market for “niche” books, and strapped budgets of the schools and libraries that once wielded major influence on overall sales.

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Roxane Gay Fights the Good Fight

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The Los Angeles Times has a great overview of our essays editor Roxane Gay’s latest efforts to spread diversity in the publishing world:

“We can’t think of gender without also considering race, class, sexuality and ability,” Gay says. “As long as we keep thinking of diversity as, ‘Oh, we need more women’ or ‘Oh, we need more people of color,’ we’re not even beginning to understand diversity.

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