Posts Tagged: YA Fiction

Bringing Asexuality to YA Fiction

By

Asexuality is often left out from discussions around queer visibility in pop culture. At Bitch Media, Lucy Mihajlich shares how she was told by an agent that her young adult dystopian trilogy, Interface, could be the next Hunger Games—but that it needed romance:

It’s particularly hard to find asexual characters in young adult fiction, which is unfortunate since adolescence is when most people begin to discover their sexual orientations.

...more

Jenn

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

By

The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

Why Some Voices Are “Stronger” than Others in YA Lit

By

At the School Library Journal, Kelly Jensen examines gender norms and double standards in YA fiction, questioning which female protagonists we refer to as “strong”—and why do not refer to male voices as such:

When women take risks in their writing, when they choose to write female-driven narratives with take-no-bull girls who may not care at all whether you like them or not, they’re not seen as brave.

...more

Would You Rather Babysit Cathy Ames or Christine Hargensen?

By

What do Yukio Mishima, Tana French, Shirley Jackson, and John Steinbeck have in common?

They’re the masterminds behind a couple of the most evil fictional youngsters of all time, according to a list compiled by British bookstore Abebooks. The list shuns contemporary malevolent characters in favor of the “utterly evil” children of yore, reasoning: “While Draco, Augustus, Violet and Veruca may be distasteful, they are actually quite mild-mannered compared to some of the horrible children literature has to offer.”

...more

Teen Reading

By

At BuzzFeed Books, Anne Helen Petersen expresses nostalgia for the reading she did as a teenager. It’s not so much that she misses the books themselves, though, but rather the “style of reading” associated with being a teen, the kind of full immersion that one isn’t able to achieve as an adult:

As adults, we’re taught to avoid that sort of reading—that sort of envelopment—because it makes us irresponsible.

...more

YA Shaming

By

Young adult fiction has never been more popular among grownup-adults—more than half of YA books are sold to people over the age of 18. There isn’t anything wrong with the occasional guilty pleasure, or even in indulging in topics that are, by definition, childish, says Ruth Graham, writing at Slate, but should we be concerned that we’re all losing some perspective?

...more

YA Fiction Feud

By

This weekend twitter hosted a feud on the subject of young adult fiction, spurred by Meghan Cox Gurdon’s article in the Wall Street Journal, detailing the perils of contemporary young adult fiction.

According to Gurdon, young adult fiction “can be like a hall of fun-house mirrors, constantly reflecting back hideously distorted portrayals of what life is.” Gurdon’s article ignited a slew of responses in the form of blog posts and hashtagged-tweets, defending the current trends of the genre, which in turn invited an onslaught of retaliation from Gurdon supporters.

...more