One Last Dan Baum Article: Sean Carman Imitates Dan Baum

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author_photo_2_biggerIf you’re not familiar with Dan Baum’s story, start here.

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One year and five killed stories later I was gone. Did I mention I have a book coming out? about 2 hours ago from web

“There’s a new artist in Chelsea.” “You’re forgetting, David,” I said. “I don’t live in New York.” about 2 hours ago from web

“Health care.” “Been done.” “Political unrest in Georgia.” “Please, David,” I said, “you’re not trying.” about 2 hours ago from web

“That’s a long way away,” I said. “What else have you got?” about 2 hours ago from web

Remnick said “write about the Mayor of Mexico City.” “I would rather not,” I said. “Then write about the Maoist revolution in Tibet,” he said. about 2 hours ago from web

Those are the differences, as I see it. about 2 hours ago from web

Except that mine is being told in these aggravating, reverse-order, posts on this novel medium. That and also I have a book out. about 2 hours ago from web

Oh yes. Many writers come and go from the New Yorker. Happens all the time. My story is really no different from any of their stories. about 2 hours ago from web

Where was I? about 2 hours ago from web

for cause. about 2 hours ago from web

Although it’s not as good as, say, being a mid-level manager at a consulting firm, where you would have benefits and could only be fired about 2 hours ago from web

It’s also better than freelancing, where you have no contract at all. about 2 hours ago from web

This, however, is better than the Letterman show, which keeps its writers on three-month contracts, and can let them go at any time. about 2 hours ago from web

Let me be clear: The New Yorker keeps all of its writers on one-year contracts. You can be let go at any time. about 2 hours ago from web

It was the fact that I had never written for the New Yorker that made my firing so painful. about 2 hours ago from web

. . . never been on staff. about 2 hours ago from web

And it’s true. My 15 some-odd Shouts and Murmurs were politely rejected, I’ve never pitched a Talk of the Town piece, and I’ve never been about 2 hours ago from web

I know what you’re thinking. Sean Carman? When did he ever write for the New Yorker? about 2 hours ago from web

Will now break the public silence, and write about my firing from The New Yorker. about 2 hours ago from web


Sean Carman has contributed to four McSweeney's humor anthologies, and has been a contestant in Literary Death Match, a finalist in NPR's Three-Minute Fiction Contest, and a winner of The New Yorker's weekly Twitter contest. His story "A Hard Rain. A Really, Really Hard Rain" was a runner-up in the Out of the Storm News Bad Writing About the Weather Contest. He lives in Washington, D.C., where he works as an environmental lawyer. More from this author →