Why Do We Still Have DADT?

By

“The people in uniform I talk to, they just want to serve without fear. For years now, gays and lesbians who are serving their country heroically in two wars—and even as a pacifist, I can’t deny their heroics—cannot say who they are. For women it is particularly brutal: many women are targeted for investigation under DADT, including straight women, because they refused the advances of a male soldier. The soldier then tells the command she must be gay, otherwise she wouldn’t have refused him. The policy is a tool of sexual harassment; I don’t know if people understand that.”

— At Guernica, Chris Lombardi interviews civil rights activist David Mixner about Don’t Ask Don’t Tell


Seth Fischer’s writing has twice been listed as notable in The Best American Essays and has been nominated for The Pushcart Prize by several publications, including Guernica. He was the founding Sunday editor at The Rumpus and is the current nonfiction editor at The Nervous Breakdown. He is a Dornsife PhD Fellow at USC and been awarded fellowships and residencies by Ucross, Lambda Literary, Jentel, Ragdale, and elsewhere, and he teaches at the UCLA-Extension Writer’s Program and Antioch University, where he received his MFA. More from this author →