Monthly Archives:: June 2012

Today I Will Let You Have Your Saturday To Yourself

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Friends, comrades, Rumpusers (Rumpusans? Rumpaloompas? Sorry), I am taking a mental health day today. However! I did write something about Sheila Heti’s new book for Slate this week that you are welcome to read. I suggest taking a powder on the comments, though. Just so you know, you needn’t let me know about the “line […]

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“The Search for Decolonial Love”

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In an extensive two–part Boston Review interview, Paula M.L. Moya talks with Junot Díaz about race and gender in his writing, emotional decolonization, and Monstro, his novel in progress. “There’s that old saying: the devil’s greatest trick is that he convinced people that he doesn’t exist. Well, white supremacy’s greatest trick is that it has convinced […]

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Back to the Foto

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Irina Wernings’ photography collections, Back to the Future 1 & 2, are hilarious and heartwarming time-machinery:  Just look at this!  And that!

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Zapruder on San Francisco

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Living in San Francisco “can be like being in a relationship with someone who is moody in an exciting and ultimately harmless way”, according to Matthew Zapruder, an SF poet, essayist, and Rumpus contributor. In an interview for Words Without Borders Zapruder discusses his 20-some year history with the city, uncovering the city’s quirks and […]

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An Open Letter

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On her blog today, respected critic Ruth Franklin wrote an open letter to the editors of Bookforum. She writes: I have considered opting out of writing for magazines at which women are not represented among the top editors, such as Bookforum. But such a policy would naturally be counter to my stated intent. So I’ve resolved to […]

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Brain Pickings

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Brain Pickings made a New Year’s resolution to read more books and write better.  They’ve been posting all kinds of interesting writerly and readerly advice. For half a year they’ve been doing a heck of a job summing up Vonnegut on penning a short story, writing rules from Kerouac, Steinbeck, and Ogilvy, Ray Bradbury and […]

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New Digs for the Classics

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Publishers, including big guns like Penguin and HarperCollins, have begun to target teen readers by reinventing the cover design of many classic pieces of literature. Like Penguin’s new edition of Romeo and Juliet which features a “Romeo in stubble and a tight white tank top”, the new covers intend to latch onto the popularity of […]

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Word Games

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Two things to spice up your probably already awesome Friday morning at work/playtime/scheming your next perfect crime: 1)  Shy Gypsy’s Funny Farm: This is a word association game to the max! It’ll knock your socks off and then tell you they rock and then, if the moment is right, insert something that rhymes with -ock into […]

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SPOTLIGHT: Avi & Jihad

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Between 2007 and 2009 I lived and worked in Jerusalem. My apartment was in Abu Tor, a hillside district near Mount Zion and the border between Israel proper and the West Bank.

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Dan Weiss’s Morning Coffee

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Long story short, there are too many wannabe bad-ass people in the world. Yes, I will link to this story about robot soccer. For the children. Running from the Elephant, 1891. Here is some old thrill ride photography porn for you. It is very nearly the 4th of July, lets look at old firecracker salesmen’s […]

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Letter Party Tonight

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We’re stuffing envelopes with Letters to Everyone this evening. If you’re in San Francisco, and in the mood to spend some time with us, come by the Latin American Club at 7pm.

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Hitchcock’s “Man from the South”

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There are lots of things to be happy about today. For instance, Open Culture unearthed Alfred Hitchcock’s adaptation of Roald Dahl’s dark short story “Man from the South” starring a young Steve McQueen who makes a wager for a convertible. Also starring a hatchet and several severed pinky fingers. Alfred Hitchcock Presents ran from 1955 […]

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Today in the Supreme Court

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Unless you’ve been away from a news source all day, you’ve probably heard that the Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, as constitutional by a vote of 5-4. Probably the biggest surprise was that Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the decision for the majority, while perennial swing vote Anthony Kennedy […]

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How To Oppress White People

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Black Girl Dangerous provides a step-by-step guide on how “reverse-racist!” people of color can continue the oppression of white people, beginning with the enslavement of white bodies and ending with the proclamation that we live in a “post-reverse-racial society” — and everything in between. “Ship them from Germany, Sweden, and other exotic countries… Let an […]

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McSweeney’s Sidewalk Sale

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McSweeney’s is throwing a summertime garage sale in San Francisco! Head over to 849 Valencia St. on Sunday, July 1st (between 11am and 4pm) to take advantage of steep discounts on books, magazines, DVDs, and more. Click here to download flyer.

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The Passion According to G.H. by Clarice Lispector

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“A note exists between two notes of music, between two facts exists a fact, between two grains of sand no matter how close together there exists an interval of space, a sense that exists between senses,” writes Brazilian novelist Clarice Lispector in The Passion According to G.H. When critics describe Lispector’s work as “mystical,” “philosophical,” […]

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‘Marking Moments When the World Changes’

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The 13th edition of the Documenta art exhibition, (a showcase of contemporary art that takes place in Germany every five years) a.k.a. ‘the Museum of 100 days,’ opened on June 9th. Always a rather serious affair, this edition deals with “moments of trauma, at turning points, accidents, catastrophes, crises — events that mark moments when the […]

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Dan Weiss’s Morning Coffee

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You guys, baby octopuses you guys. Tangent: octopi doesn’t make any sense, that’s mixing your greek and latin word origins. Let the astronauts have fresh vegetables. Let the astronauts visit galaxies that shouldn’t exist. The competitive designs for the Great Tower of London. Danish rye bread is a thing we could think about in great […]

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Self-published Author Takes On Amazon

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After two years of global roaming, Andrew Hyde funded his self-published travel book This Book Is About Travel through the website Kickstarter. His funders indicated their overwhelming preference that his book be available on a Kindle, a sentiment understood and welcomed by the author himself, who is a self-identified Kindle reader. With the Kindle garnering […]

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The Prism

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Nicolas Jaar makes songs that sound something like stripped down, rained on dance music held behind a thin layer of ice. His first album, “Space is Only Noise”, was released in early 2011 to widespread acclaim. On top of that, Jaar is a student at Brown University, the founder of independent record label Clown and […]

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Train Spottings

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The strange confluence of affection for both literature and modes of public transportation is highlighted by The New Yorker today, in their post about the website Underground New York Public Library. The website catalogues two types of subjects: people who read on trains, and the visibly disgruntled strangers who sit next to them, many of whom seem […]

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