Posts by: Marisa Siegel

The Next Generation of Female Writers

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We love Girls Write Now, the NY-based organization that helps underserved teenage girls in New York develop their creative voices and prepare for college. You can support their efforts, and preview the next generation of female writers, tomorrow at the Scholastic Auditorium in SoHo, NY from 6-8 p.m. The event features a keynote from New York Times bestselling author Christina […]

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Check Out These Girls Right Now

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Girls Write Now, a NY-based organization that helps underserved teenage girls in New York develop their creative voices and prepare for college, continues their 2014 CHAPTERS reading series this Friday (5/30) with an evening featuring celebrated writer Ana Castillo and original work performed by participants in the Girls Write Now program. Get your tickets for this great event today—teens get […]

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Irresistible Narrators and Riveting Scenes with Steve Almond

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Rumpus columnist and friend Steve Almond is teaching two classes at the Grotto in San Francisco on July 19th! How to Write Riveting Scenes will investigate what it takes to keep readers on the edge of their seats, while How to Create Irresistible Narrators examines the work of Nabokov, Salinger, Austen, and others in an effort […]

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Girls Write Now NYC Reading This Friday!

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Girls Write Now, an awesome organization that works with underserved teenage girls in New York to develop their creative voices, continues their 2014 CHAPTERS reading series with an evening featuring author, reporter, and broadcaster Farai Chideya and original work from Girls Write Now participants. Get your tickets to this great event here—teens get in free!

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Elizabeth Bishop’s Favorite Island

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We know Bishop primarily as the eager traveler who wrote of distant, tropical locations and lived for many years as an expat in Brazil. She was that, of course, but she was also an aficionado of her native landscape and climate. Our canon’s consummate poet of geography, maps, and the mystery of spatial awareness loved […]

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The Future of English

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Are English departments dying? Or, are they simply changing to meet the wants and needs of today’s students? Emory University professor Marc Bousquet argues it’s the latter, and sees more change ahead: If universities like mine are still offering doctorates in English 10 years from now, the programs won’t resemble the lit-only degrees at Yale or […]

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Literature, Meet Video Games

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Over at The Millions, Maxwell Neely-Cohen argues that video games and literature have more in common than we think. Moreover, he suggests that the two genres could benefit significantly from working together: We should be making novels into video games, video games into novels. Publishers should collaborate with indie game developers, trading them a platform […]

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Writing “the very stuff of life”

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Today in unusual writing jobs: an inside look at what it’s like to be an obituary news writer for the New York Times. Each day, it is our job to come to know such strangers intimately, inhaling their lives through telephone calls to their families, through newspaper and magazine profiles culled from electronic databases and […]

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UMass Amherst Celebrates 50 Years of MFA Writing!

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Online literary magazine Route Nine released a special alumni issue to celebrate the UMass Amherst MFA for Poets & Writers’s 50th Anniversary. Route Nine is edited by Rumpus Tumblr editor Molly McArdle. In addition, the W. E. B. Du Bois Library inaugurated an MFA Special Collection featuring five decades of ephemera from program participants and The Massachusetts Review has released a special […]

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A 21st Century Kind of Poet

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At The Millions, Michael Bourne writes about the stunning success of poet Tess Taylor’s debut collection, The Forage House, and technology’s hand in making it happen: When writers talk about literature in the digital age, they tend to lay out one nightmare scenario after another: books losing value as they migrate onto screens, publishing houses shedding […]

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Money Problems

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Reading, writing and thinking are all tasks that are nearly impossible to cultivate while performing manual labor. As Plato first noted, when discussing education, “sleep and exercise are unpropitious to learning,” and therefore students should avoid intense exercise as they pursue educational endeavors. Writing is what Veblen would call “conspicuous consumption,” a task primarily done […]

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The Works Behind the Work

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Over at the New Yorker, Meg Wolitzer writes about the cultural influences that helped inform her novel The Interestings. They include Archie comics, folk music, and Michael Apted’s “Up” films”: A good chunk of what you need to know about the characters in the “Up” films is right there in their childhoods, and I suppose that’s true […]

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Join Us!

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The Rumpus is looking for volunteers: If you like to write: we need 3 volunteer bloggers to help out with the Rumpus blog on an ongoing basis, and one SF-based blogger to carry on the Notable San Francisco torch. Send a brief email with relevant experience and a sample Rumpus blog post to [email protected] If you like to […]

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The Elusive Happy Ending

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Happy endings are hard to come by in great literature, especially in stories that center on affluent American suburbs and their inhabitants. Over at the Atlantic, writer Ted Thompson looks at the hopeful and redemptive (but still believable) dramatic climax of John Cheever’s “The Housebreaker of Shady Hill”: This is one of the things that’s […]

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“A Bitter Cup of Tea” Worth Drinking

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Electric Literature has a new review up for Rumpus columnist Jerry Stahl‘s latest book, Happy Mutant Baby Pills: Jerry Stahl’s Happy Mutant Baby Pills is a hurricane of comedic and satirical horrors involving drug abuse, violence, manic lovers (including their manic sex lives), and ungodly revenge against the United States. Stahl ventures unapologetically through the darkest imaginable places. And for […]

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All Roads Lead to Writing

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Over at The Millions, Rumpus contributor Nick Ripatrazone looks at the many and varied paths that bring writers to the profession and considers the benefits of time spent studying subjects other than creative writing: Although I have drifted toward the science of syntax, I think about the positives of studying content that is not literary. My […]

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Fiction in the Digital Age

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Serialized fiction is experiencing a resurgence, and we have technology to thank. Back in 2012, The Silent History brought the serialized novel to our iPhones (check out our interview with co-author Kevin Moffett here). And now, there’s Wattpad. The New York Times takes an in-depth look the app, which sees “more than two million writers producing 100,000 pieces of […]

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The Decline of Punctuation?!…

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We live in a heyday of punctuation. “Call this what you will—exclamatory excess, punctuation inflation, the result of the Internet’s limitless expanse—it is everywhere,” writes Megan Garber at the Atlantic. But perhaps not for long—with the rise of image-based expression like emoji and gifs, we are finding new ways to express ourselves, and we’re leaving […]

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