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Posts by: Nicholas Rombes

The Girl with the Hidden Face

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I’ve been a professor at the University of Detroit Mercy for over fifteen years, but it wasn’t until last month that I noticed the girl shielding her face from the camera. The photograph hangs in the English Department’s Dudley Randall Center for Print Culture, named after the powerful and influential poet and publisher Dudley Randall, […]

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Women in Trouble

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While we usually classify films in terms of their genre, or their director, or the actors, what if, instead, we looked for visual patterns that linked them? An auteur theory based purely on images, not the director.

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10/40/70 #19: Notes on a Scandal

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This ongoing experiment in film writing freezes a film at 10, 40, and 70 minutes, and keeps the commentary as close to those frames as possible. This week, I examine Notes on a Scandal, directed by Richard Eyre and based on a novel by Zoë Heller.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #22: Nicholas Rombes in Conversation with Alex Smith

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Alex Smith lives in New York City, where he works as a homepage editor at MSN and as a freelance contributor for the New Yorker. During the interview, Alex drank a Kingfisher, and Rombes an Oberon. Some of Alex’s writing can be found at Flaming Pablum.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #17: Nicholas Rombes in Conversation with Joseph Sullivan

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Joseph Sullivan works as a user experience designer for a large trade association in Chicago. “A user experience designer,” he said, “used to be called an information architect. Someone recently defined the job as ‘building structures,’ and that’s about right. Another way to think about it: I try to represent the users of our websites […]

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10/40/70 #7: New Moon, Twin Peaks

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This ongoing experiment in film writing freezes a film at 10, 40, and 70 minutes, and keeps the commentary as close to those frames as possible. This week, I examine New Moon, with notes on Twin Peaks and surrealism.

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10/40/70 #6: Punishment Park

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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10/40/70 #5: Cure

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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10/40/70 #4: Cleo from 5 to 7

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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10/40/70 #3: Raising Cain

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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10/40/70 #2: Out of the Past

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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10/40/70 #1: Starship Troopers

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This column is an experiment in writing about film: what if, instead of freely choosing which parts of the film to address, I select three different, arbitrary time codes (in this case and for future columns, the 10-minute, 40-minute, and 70-minute mark), freeze the frames, and use that as a guide to writing about the film, […]

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