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Posts Tagged: Alan Moore

Books You Can Deadlift

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At Lit Hub, Joshua Zadjman talks about Alan Moore’s Jerusalem as the new zenith of the modern doorstopper novel: What is Jerusalem? It’s an experience you can more easily press on people than explain to them. Moore’s 1,260-page second novel,Jerusalem, will land in bookstores later this month with acclaim, conjecture, and hopefully even a trumpet or two—but it’s likely that […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Benjamin Percy

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Benjamin Percy discusses his latest novel, The Dead Lands, why it’s all about keeping language fresh, and his dream job writing for DC Comics.

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Word of the Day: Virago

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(n.); manlike or heroic woman; a woman of extraordinary stature, strength and courage; a domineering, violent or bad-tempered woman “I would also observe that it is, potentially, culturally catastrophic to have the ephemera of a previous century squatting possessively on the cultural stage and refusing to allow this surely unprecedented era to develop a culture […]

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Million Word Novel

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Author Alan Moore, best known for graphic novels like The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and V for Vendetta, has just finished the first draft of his second novel, Jerusalem, a manuscript with a million words. The Guardian reports that Moore’s latest work beats out classic long reads like Samuel Richardson’s 970,000 word Clarissa or Tolstoy’s 560,000 word War and Peace. There […]

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The Cleverest Boy in the World

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There are many things about legendary comic-book writer Alan Moore that are difficult to understand: why he’s turned down so much of the money from film adaptations of graphic novels like Watchmen and V for Vendetta, why he still lives in rundown old Northampton, why he keeps his beard like that. (Okay, that last one’s obvious—the beard […]

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Alan Moore on Superheroes

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Actually, there’s a lot more to this interview with Alan Moore than just his view on superheroes–it’s largely about The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: 1969, which should be released next month–but I really enjoyed this bit on the problem with today’s superheroes. “I do have a feeling, particularly in this last decade, that some of […]

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