Posts Tagged: american south

One Burning Question: A Conversation with Evelyn C. White

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“I understood in that moment that my life had changed forever. And it has.”

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How to Become a Poet: A Conversation with Ashley M. Jones

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“You don’t have to drink yourself into the Great American Poetry Masterpiece.”

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These Places Surround Me: Talking with Quintan Ana Wikswo

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Quintan Ana Wikswo discusses her novel, A Long Curving Scar Where the Heart Should Be, delving into the facets of trauma, and her creative processes.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #125: Tyree Daye

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“I think if you are really doing the work, you can’t write about America and not explore race and slavery, and that goes for any writer.”

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To Look for America: A Road Trip, a Soundtrack

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One thing I was taught about travel—because my father is a black man born in Alabama in 1950—was that there are safe places for black people to go and places that aren’t as safe.

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Chewing Rocks: A Conversation with David Biespiel

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David Biespiel discusses his new book, The Education of a Young Poet, being comfortable in uncertainty, and extending moments in writing.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Brooke C. Obie

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Brooke C. Obie discusses the historical basis for her debut novel, Book of Addis, writing to dismantle white supremacy, and why Black speculative fiction is integral to her survival.

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Nothing Foreign about It: Talking with Omar El Akkad

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Omar El Akkad discusses his debut novel American War, suicide terrorism, fossil fuels, and blankets.

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The Lens Magnifies, the Mirror Reflects: What Photos from the Race War Show Us about Ourselves

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[Still photos] grab what otherwise might feel too foreign to understand.

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Basura

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[T]erms like “white trash” and basura most accurately reveal those who are doing the defining. Consider what we throw away, and why. Look at what we throw away. Think about the reasons why.

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I Will Not Die for You

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Each bug in the water is one less bug on my fruit, I tell myself, ignoring the truth: under the soil, another is born.

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Ward’s Mississippi Is Our Mississippi: Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

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Capturing the Delta in harrowing detail, Ward takes readers on a journey from her own home of the Gulf Coast to the Mississippi State Penitentiary.

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The Possible Absence of a Future: Talking with Jorie Graham

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Jorie Graham discusses her latest collection, Fast, the terrifying destruction of our planet, a happy formal accident, and how to live in times of world crisis.

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Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could.

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Your Patriotism Isn’t Love, It’s Blindness

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Love of country, some argue. With their boots firmly planted in my chest as I struggle to protest. No, that is not love, but blindness.

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There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

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It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 15): “Southern History”

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We can’t hide from our history and we can’t pass it on to future generations.

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Readers Report: The New Patriot

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A collection of short pieces written by Rumpus readers pertaining to the subject of “The New Patriot.”

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Peeping under the Goddamn Door: The Price of Empathy in S-Town

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[F]or the first time, I really see the tradeoffs between privacy and honest-to-god, up-close empathy.

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Literary Rim Shots: A Chat with John Grisham

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John Grisham discusses his advice for young writers, the literary mafia, and why he finally wrote a (literal) beach read.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

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Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended.

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Lone Star Cinema

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In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Adrian Matejka

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Adrian Matejka discusses his new collection Map to the Stars, writing about poverty in contemporary poetry, and how racism maintains its place in our society.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #75: Deborah Kampmeier

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I met Deborah Kampmeier at a workshop in November. We were two weeks post-election; the room was raw with emotion, and electric with conversations about resistance. This tall, badass woman dressed in all black sauntered into the room, and chose a seat at the table. When she read, my solar plexus exploded, and I couldn’t stop […]

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 8): “Song of the Gourd”

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“Song of the Gourd” is like an eye roll at this sort of gusto about leaving the Southland.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jacqueline Woodson

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Jacqueline Woodson discusses her latest novel Another Brooklyn, the little deaths of lost friendships, and her work with children across the country as the Poetry Foundation’s Young People’s Poet Laureate.

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Crybaby College Students and Their Bogus Trophies

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I’m a small blue dot living in a blood-red corner of a red state, so I’ve grown accustomed to hearing right wing talking points. I don’t like them, but they surface as regularly in my southwest Florida town as white egrets on the highway and dolphins in the Gulf. Talking points at the grocery store, […]

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Post-Election Dispatch: Charleston, SC

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Right now as I write this, smoke from fires in the southeastern Appalachian Mountains haze the morning. We’re under orange alert—the air quality bad enough that schoolchildren will stay indoors today. This morning the coastal flooding is up again thanks to the powerful tidal pulls of the recent supermoon. On my errand this morning, I […]

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