Posts Tagged: Ben Lerner

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Amy Fusselman

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Amy Fusselman discusses her new book, IDIOPHONE!

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A Curious Swarm or Energy: Talking with Rachel B. Glaser

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Rachel B. Glaser discusses her newest poetry collection, HAIRDO, her writing process, and the books and writers that have influenced her.

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Notable NYC: 6/10–6/16

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Saturday 6/10: Katie Kitamura and others join AmpLit Fest. Pier i, West 70th Street, Noon, Free. Sunday 6/11: Hafizah Geter, Ricardo Alberto Maldonado, Lara Mimosa Montes, Cathy Linh Che, Lucas De Lima, and Carly Joy Miller join the Dead Rabbits Reading Series. DTUT, 8 p.m., free. Matt DiPentima, Etan Nchin, Iris Cohen, and Jen DeGregorio […]

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A Death Blow Can Be a Life Blow to Some

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What does it mean to be carried away? To be captured, carried off, liberated? To lose control of oneself? Lerner doesn’t show concern for questions like these. More generally, The Hatred of Poetry takes little interest in the rarities of technique across a poet’s body of work and avoids questions about his or her sense […]

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Monica Youn

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club chats with Monica Youn about her new collection Blackacre, hypothetical tracts of land, Milton, and infertility.

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The Hope Whose Death It Announces

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Poetry is defined by a failure to live up to the hype it generates, promising divine transcendence through a medium that is essentially human. This is the paradox Ben Lerner articulates in his dissertation on The Hatred of Poetry. At The New Republic, Ken Chen doesn’t buy it: You get the sense Lerner’s intellectualized peevishness […]

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Notable NYC: 6/4–6/10

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Saturday 6/4: Marian Fontana, Ariel Stess, Kathleen Donohoe, and Amy Sohn join the Brooklyn Writers Space reading series. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. Cat Fitzpatrick, Merritt Kopas, Allison Parrish, Thel Seraphim, Charles Theonia, and Paco Salas Pérez celebrate an evening of Transgender Poetry and also a new location for Spoonbill & Sugartown. Spoonbill & Sugartown Montrose […]

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Notable NYC: 4/16–4/22

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Saturday 4/16: Stefanie Lipsey, Ann Prodracky, and Melissa Thomas join the Oh, Bernice reading series. Astoria Bookshop, 7 p.m., free. Jibade-Khalil Huffman and Gabriela Jauregui join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 4/17: Greg Purcell, Ish Klein, and Karen Weiser read poetry. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 7 p.m., free. Desirée Alvarez, Helen Klein […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Elisa Gabbert

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Author Elisa Gabbert talks about her books, The Self Unstable and The French Exit, diversity, publishing, whiteness, and writing in the Internet Age.

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Imagine That

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Like every other year, in 2015 we wrestled with the knowledge of our constructed selves. But rather than eschew personhood as a postmodernist might, we considered just who we’ve been inventing: What do you write about when you no longer put stock in the idea—the narrative—that nature exists objectively and independently of our stories about […]

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Notable NYC: 5/2–5/8

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Saturday 5/2: Independent Bookstore Day: Events are being held throughout the day at your neighborhood bookstore. The following stores are hosting special events: WORD; Housing Works; McNally Jackson; Greenlight Bookstore; BookCourt; Community Bookstore; The Strand; BookCulture; Astoria Bookshop. Emma Straub, Jami Attenberg, and Angela Flournoy host Independent Bookstore Day Afterparty. Powerhouse Arena, 9 p.m., free. Andy […]

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The Art of Literature

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Literature often depends on the strategic disappointment of expectation. Sometimes, the effect of that is humorous; at other times, it’s unnerving: I consider it crucial to the composition of a novel. Laughter is physical; it involves the body of the reader in the book in a way that other responses don’t. It’s a tonal antidote […]

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Word of the Day: Atelier

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(n.); artist’s studio or workshop; c. 1840, from the old French astelier (“carpenter’s workshop, woodpile”) “Part of what I loved about poetry was how the distinction between fiction and nonfiction didn’t obtain,” [Lerner] says, “how the correspondence between text and world was less important than the intensities of the poem itself.” From “With Storms Outside, […]

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Another Station

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When the The New York Times asked for his background, Ben Lerner answered the best he could: “Suburban-white-kid crime, Columbine High School sort of thing,” he said. “A violence of numbness and identitylessness.” In the Parul Sehgal’s piece, the author of Leaving the Atocha Station also touches on parenthood, Joan of Arc, and his upcoming […]

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Notable NYC: 3/8–3/14

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Saturday 3/8: Ben Marcus talks about his new story collection, Leaving the Sea (January 2014), Rob Spillman, editor of Tin House. Brooklyn Public Library, 4 p.m., free. Craig Morgan Teicher, Wendy Lotterman, Nicole Steinberg, Sarah V. Schweig, Ted Dodson, Krystal Languell, Joanna C. Valente, Jesse Kohn, Jonathan Aprea, Joe DeLuca, and M. Callen celebrate issue […]

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Ben Lerner in The New Yorker

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“In the name of clarity, a lot of authors offer what strike me as basically pre-fabricated structures of feeling, leaving no room for the reader to participate in the construction of meaning.” Ben Lerner, poet and author of Leaving the Atocha Station, touches on his different approaches to poetry and fiction, balancing clarity and complexity, […]

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