Posts Tagged: blurbs

Don’t (Blurb) Speak

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Wallace coined the helpful term “blurbspeak,” which he defined as “a very special subdialect of English that’s partly hyperbole, but it’s also phrases that sound really good and are very compelling in an advertorial sense, but if you think about them, they’re literally meaningless.” Though David Foster Wallace was somewhat skeptical about book blurbs, he […]

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Gary Shteyngart Won’t Blurb Your Book

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A Gary Shteyngart blurb seemed almost a rite of passage in recent years, with the author of Super Sad True Love Story offering his recommendation to more than one hundred books. But Kirsten Reach reports that the author has retired from the art of book blurbing—and offers some of her favorite Shteyngart blurbs—in a reflection […]

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The Ancient Art of the Book Blurb

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Book blurbs—and the controversies surrounding them—go back as far as Thomas More, who gathered a bouquet of them for Utopia. Ben Jonson blurbed Shakespeare. Ralph Waldo Emerson blurbed Walt Whitman. But do they really mean anything anymore? Click through to find out—and read historical blurbs and blurb satires like this one: Say! Ain’t this book a […]

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Erickson Eats Oranges, Or How To Really Like A Book

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I’m a sucker for blurbs, I have to admit. But then writers blurb their friends, right? It’s just the right thing to do, so maybe it doesn’t say that much about the book.  Yet I’m always looking to see what writers have praised what books and why. It’s borderline compulsive. (Jonathan Lethem, I’ve decided, has […]

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The Ethics of the Book Blurb

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Are there political advantages to writing book blurbs? Are there ethical lines writers shouldn’t cross? Scott Esposito of Conversational Reading weighs in using Nicole Krauss’ positive, to say the very least, blurb of David Grossman’s To the End of the Land. What’s your take on the blurb? Does Krauss go a tad overboard or is […]

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