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Posts Tagged: dystopia

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Heather McHugh

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Heather McHugh discusses her new poetry collection, MUDDY MATTERHORN.

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That Constant Movement: A Conversation with Luis Othoniel Rosa

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Luis Othoniel Rosa discusses his novel, DOWN WITH GARGAMEL!.

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The Privilege of Art: Courtney Maum’s Costalegre

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There is no real freedom to create art, only the obligation to wealth.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers

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Elizabeth Lindsey Rogers discusses her new collection, THE TILT TORN AWAY FROM THE SEASONS.

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A Gripping, Limited Call to Arms: Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments

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There are so many happy endings that dystopia and utopia become almost indistinguishable by the novel’s end.

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A Complicated, Shifting Subjectivity: Talking with Franny Choi

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Franny Choi discusses her second collection, SOFT SCIENCE.

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Writing in Earnest: Talking with Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

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Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah discusses FRIDAY BLACK.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Peter Mishler

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Peter Mishler discusses his debut collection, Fludde, the effect of ritual on poems, and childhood psychology.

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This Future Is Here: Talking with Tom McAllister

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Tom McAllister discusses his new novel, How to Be Safe, workshops, Twitter, dystopia, and narrative voice.

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Letting Go of What We Love: Talking with Rachel Heng

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Rachel Heng discusses her debut novel, Suicide Club, the book’s genesis, her writing and reading life, and her thoughts on “wellness.”

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Sarah Blake

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Sarah Blake discusses her new collection, Let’s Not Live on Earth, questions in poems, monsters, and the challenge of writing a dystopia.

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I Am Here to Make Friends

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I’m not here to wallow in what feels like our new dystopia, no. Me? I am here, to rest up before the next bout. I am here to watch The Price Is Right and make friends.

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Nothing Foreign about It: Talking with Omar El Akkad

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Omar El Akkad discusses his debut novel American War, suicide terrorism, fossil fuels, and blankets.

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The Possible Absence of a Future: Talking with Jorie Graham

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Jorie Graham discusses her latest collection, Fast, the terrifying destruction of our planet, a happy formal accident, and how to live in times of world crisis.

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A Specific Kind of Loneliness: In Conversation with Geeta Kothari

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Geeta Kothari discusses her debut collection, American xenophobia, and the immigrant narrative.

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This Week in Books: American Purgatory

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice. If we’re going to move our national narrative away from […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Well, it’s been one week under the Trump administration, and already we are living in a land of “alternative facts.” After Kellyanne Conway used the term to defend Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s falsehoods regarding the inauguration crowd size on Sunday, the American people were, understandably, reminded of George Orwell’s 1984, and sales of the book […]

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The Rumpus interview with Jeremy P. Bushnell

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Jeremy P. Bushnell discusses his new novel, The Insides, themes of consent, and designing a post-apocalyptic board game.

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The Handmaid’s (Cautionary) Tale

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At The Establishment, Laura Beans discusses the importance of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale as a predictive novel, drawing many connections between the novel and increasing attempts to control women’s bodies: Instead of seeming further from the truth, the novel’s warnings only seem to echo louder in recent years. Atwood’s analysis of her own twisted […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Granta’s summer issue is themed “The Legacies of Love,” and in a new story from the online issue, Glasgow-based writer Sophie Mackintosh strips love back to its animal bones in a story that is less rom-com and more Hunger Games, but without the love triangle. Murder class was the new thing, but of course they […]

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Imagining A Dystopian Olympic Games

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At the Huffington Post, Maddie Crum and Maxwell Strachan ask 7 science fiction authors to hypothesize about what a dystopian Olympics might look like. While most of the authors acknowledge the influence that climate change and technology will have on the Olympics, Crum and Strachan note that the authors’ responses are surprisingly optimistic. Here’s how Malka Older, […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Some people write about dystopian futures, or reimagined folktales, or ghosts, or science fiction. Sequoia Nagamatsu, author of the upcoming story collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, does it all. The debut collection, out this month from Black Lawrence Press, weaves Japanese folklore and pop culture into fantastical plots and futuristic […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Chris Jennings

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Chris Jennings talks about his new book Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism, incremental reform, Transcendentalists, Shakers, and creating a more perfect future.

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The Circle Is Watching

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In a world where boundaries between private and public are already blurring, Tim and Nicolaas wanted to find out what would happen if those boundaries disappeared altogether.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Imagine a world in the late 21st century: countries are underwater from the rising oceans, Europeans have become refugees, and a mathematical formula has been discovered that explains the entire universe, the applications of which include human flight (sans airplane) and the ability to remove pain and grief. That’s the world Lesley Nneka Arimah has […]

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