Posts Tagged: Film

Scars of War: Watching Battle of the Sexes

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Until recently, coming out was almost always dangerous—not only to our careers and our relationships but also to our bodies. And so hiding was (and sometimes still is) a necessity. ...more

Spaces of Exception vs. Spaces of Redemption: The Films of Ana Lily Amirpour

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Diasporic communities live inside a host nation, but they also live with difference. ...more

Erasing the Girl: Why Don’t We Trust Women to Tell Their Stories of Disordered Eating?

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I didn’t want to criticize her, or demand explanations from her. I just wanted to hear her speak. ...more

Empathy Is Cheap: A Conversation with Brandon Harris

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Brandon Harris discusses his memoir Making Rent in Bed-Stuy, gentrification in New York City and Brooklyn, the homogenization of American cities by corporate America, and whiteness of film culture. ...more

There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

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It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star. ...more

The Rumpus Review of It Comes at Night

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“It” does not even “come” in the traditional sense. These primal, atavistic qualities are with us all the time, lying dormant until the right situation coaxes them forth. ...more

How The Keepers Reframes Confession as a Feminist Act

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Critics have noted how The Keepers is similar to other prestige documentaries but with a significant difference—its focus on the victims and their stories. ...more

Out of the Trenches: The Rumpus Review of Wonder Woman

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If there was ever a case for women avoiding Botox, Diana’s signature skepticism for the patriarchy is it. She has never encountered womanhood as subordinate, and she’s not about to start. ...more

Lone Star Cinema

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In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, the writers and books that influenced it, tackling addiction with compassion, and the magic of teenage girls. ...more

Don’t Think Twice and the Power of Improvising through the Unknown

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It’s a little extraordinary when you realize that you’re the one getting in your own way. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #77: Hauschka

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Lion could be a simple homecoming story, the prodigal son returning to the place he was born. Except, the son in question was six when he left. Now, he’s twenty-six and his story is far from simple. Garth Davis’s film, like his TV offering Top of the Lake, is a beautiful, emotional rollercoaster. 

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #75: Deborah Kampmeier

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I met Deborah Kampmeier at a workshop in November. We were two weeks post-election; the room was raw with emotion, and electric with conversations about resistance. This tall, badass woman dressed in all black sauntered into the room, and chose a seat at the table.

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The Rumpus Interview with Kea Wilson

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Kea Wilson discusses her debut novel We Eat Our Own, the influence of film on her work, and what she's learned from working as a bookseller. ...more

Oscars Flub as Grand Finale for Camp

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On the Hollywood stage—amidst gasps, jaw drops, and pearl clutches—we witnessed one final, beautifully coded failure and an over-the-top dethroning of the serious. ...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #78: Conceived as a Playlist

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Shadowbahn [...] is among the most unusual, and most extreme, in a literary career that has often been marked by its unpredictability. ...more

Safety Nets: On Seeing Movies with My Children

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There’s no blueprint for any of this. If there were, I would have read it by now. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #71: Kris D’Agostino

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In Kris D’Agostino’s second novel, The Antiques, he returns to familiar forms: A dysfunctional family whose members are in various stages of arrested development; a generational home in upstate New York; and the absurdity of life in its most darkly comedic moments.

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The Rumpus Interview with Tobias Carroll

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Tobias Carroll discusses his newest collection Transitory, the influence of film on his writing, and getting good news at bad times. ...more

The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

The Rumpus Review of La La Land

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Fantasy needs reality “because it’s only with the real backdrop that it works at all,” and reality needs fantasy to challenge its façade ...more

Macho Prey: Homophobia and Unlikely Victims in Tickled

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The film only grazes the issue, but homophobia is the fuel of the harassment that the targets face. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to home, chronicling in fictional form the journey he himself embarked upon as a youth.

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The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

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Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more