Posts Tagged: germany

The Evolution of Present-Day Greece: Talking with Nanos Valaoritis

By

Poet and author Nanos Valaoritis discusses the political and cultural situation in Greece today.

...more

A Language in Constant Rebellion: Talking with Aura Xilonen

By

Aura Xilonen discusses her novel, Gringo Champion, the realities of immigration, translating texts, and her love of cinema.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Erik Kennedy

By

Poet Erik Kennedy discusses literary community and his formative years as a young writer in New Jersey, and shares two new prose poems.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Saleem Haddad

By

Saleem Haddad discusses his debut novel Guapa, the Orlando shootings, the importance of queer spaces, and Arab literature.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Rachel Hall

By

Rachel Hall discusses her debut collection Heirlooms, her mother’s experience growing up in a French Jewish family during World War II, and crossing genre borders in her writing.

...more

Leaving Aleppo: Crossing Syria’s Most Dangerous Checkpoints

By

After four years of ceaseless bombing and brutality, the security of life itself has been reduced in Aleppo to horror, terror, and scarcity of basic human resources.

...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Saša Stanišić

By

The Rumpus Book Club chats with Saša Stanišić about his novel Before the Feast, the challenge of writing a plural narrator, working with a translator, and book tours in Germany.

...more

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Keith Newton

By

What’s interesting, of course, is how modern life could easily be seen in the opposite way—as an ever-expanding domain of individuality and self-expression.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Cole Swensen

By

Cole Swensen, author of fifteen collections of poetry, discusses her work, walking, and her recent travels.

...more
Darryl Pinckney

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Darryl Pinckney

By

If your family or your people are looking over your shoulder, change your seat or push them away. Ask them to trust you with the truth.

...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

If you ever wanted to own one of the nation’s oldest bookstores, now’s your chance. Otto Bookstore in Williamsport, Pennsylvania has been operating since 1841, but the 81-year-old proprietor is in the market to sell. The Oregonian names Portland’s 10 best bookstores, and world-famous Powell’s didn’t make the cut. That said, Powell’s is expanding, so maybe the famous […]

...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

A Saudi Arabian bookstore chain has removed Donald Trump’s book from its shelves because of offensive comments the real estate developer and reality television star has made during his presidential campaign. A bookstore in Saratoga Springs bookstore found itself the target of a ranting man who threatened to put the shop out of business for […]

...more

Michel Tournier and the Novel of Ideas

By

Do novels think?

...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

A Paris bookseller writes about the terror attacks. Parisians, meanwhile, are responding to the terror attacks by buying up all the copies of Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast. Iranian bookstores opened early on Thursday last week in a campaign to encourage reading in the country. A bookstore in Germany serves as a cultural hub for […]

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Adam Johnson

By

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Adam Johnson talks about his new book, Fortune Smiles, fiction and voice, veterans and defectors, solar-powered robots and self-driving cars, and infrared baseball caps that can blind security cameras.

...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Song in the Subjunctive

By

Perhaps the city looked more poignantly lovely because I was conscious of its tragic history.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Erik Larson

By

Bestselling author Erik Larson talks about his new book, Dead Wake, his transition from journalism to history, and what, in his opinion, makes a first-rate nonfiction novel.

...more

Typewriters Are Latest High Tech Spy Tool

By

In the wake of American spies tapping into every form of electronic communication, Germany is considering typewriters for highly sensitive documents. The Russians have already instituted such measures. Typewriters aren’t foolproof though. In 1984, the Soviets listened to the keystrokes of US Embassy secretaries, looking for patterns. Meanwhile, for less sensitive documents, there is Typing […]

...more

Book of Wikipedia

By

Some Wikipedia fans in Germany are aiming to change the way the online, editable encyclopedia is read. The group known as PediaPress is trying to raise $50,000 to turn the website into a 1,000 volume set of books, each containing around 1,200 pages. Their goal is to exhibit the printed encyclopedia at a Wikimania conference […]

...more

“It Was Worth Every Minute and More”

By

Writing-biz veteran Lydia Laurenson once landed a translation deal for a book that involved her German publisher flying her to Germany for professional photography sessions and multiple TV appearances. “Yet, when I calculated it,” she writes, “I made way less than minimum wage per hour.” Read the rest of her post on the entrepreneurial side […]

...more

Get Ready To Tell Your Kids About Prince Dung Beetle

By

While the Brothers Grimm were collecting fairytales and folklore around Germany, another historian was doing the same thing. His name was Franz Xaver von Schönwerth, and the 500 fairytales he recorded in Bavaria were only recently uncovered. The Guardian has more on the multitude of new bedtime stories, including a translation of one called “The Turnip Princess.”

...more