Posts Tagged: Guernica

This Week in Essays

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In a stunning bit of reportage at Guernica, Lacy M. Johnson looks at the costs of laying nuclear waste to rest, and at the impact doing so has had on one particular St. Louis suburb. For Nowhere, Hillary Kaylor finds there’s little she can do to help the kids who spend their days scavenging a dump in Cambodia.

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This Week in Essays

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At Nowhere, Alia Volz takes a long-shot journey to Cuba to tie up loose ends. For Guernica, Katherina Grace Thomas writes about that time Nina Simone loved and left paradise. Here at The Rumpus, Alaina Leary considers the painful work of accounting for family possessions under dire circumstances.

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This Week in Essays

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For The Smart Set, Natasha Burge walks the streets of Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and examines the ways both cities and selves can change through time. In this latest Multitudes installment for The Rumpus, Christine No writes a stunning piece on family and attempts at healing.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #81: Chanelle Benz

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Chanelle Benz’s debut collection, The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead, is filled with characters often facing a moral crossroads. The stories contain the unexpected, like a classic Western complete with local brothel as well as a gothic tale. Benz’s writing has appeared in Electric Literature, Guernica, The American Reader, and Granta.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, a woman mysteriously becomes pregnant with a lizard egg in a short story at Guernica that is weird, funny, and surprisingly sweet. By Benjamin Schaefer, Prose Editor of Fairy Tale Review, “Lizard-Baby” explores themes of motherhood, difference, and community, and all through the fresh new lens of immaculate lizard-birth.

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This Week in Essays

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For Guernica, Carmen Maria Machado writes about cultural myths around large women and fighting to take up space with her body and her mind. Woe be to those who buy the Peggy couch. Anna Hezel pens a hilarious “buyer beware” at The Awl. Over at Lit Hub, Stéphane Gerson shares the process of writing his grief after losing his son.

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This Week in Essays

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Through her work with Doctors Without Borders, Caitlin L. Chandler offers us a glimpse of what life is like on the Syrian border for Guernica. For Real Life magazine, Christopher Schaberg examines the symbolism of airports as “fraught borderlands” perfect for a protest. Here at The Rumpus, Katharine Coldiron takes our minds for a spin around the concepts of […]

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of […]

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This Week in Essays

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Men will not protect you anymore. At Jezebel, Madeleine Davies advises that “now is a time for fury and force.” Mark Binelli looks into life on the border town of Nogales for Guernica. Here at The Rumpus, Matthew Clair writes about how we must do more than simply gaze upon suffering; actions speak louder than images.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week at Guernica’s newly re-designed website, author Jean McGarry has a short story, “Come to Me,” about an abusive relationship and the tangled dynamics of power and devotion that can hold its victims in place. That was day four; on day one, I found underwear, not my own, in my underwear drawer. Are you […]

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“A Changed World”

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Don’t write about trying to change the world, just write about a changed world or a world that’s not changing. Let that do the work. Paul Beatty’s formally experimental, informally humanely scathing novel about race, The Sellout, has just won the Man Booker Prize. Chris Paul Wolfe interviews Beatty for Guernica, touching on invented languages […]

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 4): “Roosters”

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the roosters brace their cruel feet and glare // with stupid eyes / while from their beaks there rise / the uncontrolled, traditional cries.

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A Convergence of Selves

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In an illuminating interview with Claire Schwartz for Guernica, writer Kai Cheng Thom discusses activism, the unique intersections felt by people of color in the queer community, consensual behavior, trauma, and the immigrant experience. It’s a lot of ground to cover, and in doing so she reveals the convergence of all these areas of concern into […]

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In the Air Tonight

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Over at Guernica, Jennifer Baum explores the poetics and the politics of soot, interweaving stories of her childhood growing up in a deeply polluted New York with a timeline of environmental laws and stats: The flakes of black soot, which drifted onto our terrace like snow was particulate matter comprised mostly of carbon and sulfur […]

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By the People, for the People

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At Guernica, Tana Wojcznick unpacks Shakespeare’s lesser-known and often-misread play, Coriolanus, to bring us s its timely political warning about populism and democracy: It’s no accident that Coriolanus is not a favorite in America, where it’s rarely included in the mini-canon of plays each generation tends to play and re-play (such as King Lear today […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, Guernica has a new story from author and veteran Odie Lindsey, whose debut story collection about soldiers coming home from war, We Come to Our Senses, will be published by W.W. Norton later this month. Included in the collection, “Bird (on back)” picks up in the middle of a disintegrating relationship between an […]

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