Posts Tagged: jason diamond

Notable NYC: 7/21–7/27

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Literary events in and around New York City this week!

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Notable NYC: 12/16–12/22

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Literary events and readings in and around New York City this week!

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Notable NYC: 8/5–8/11

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Saturday 8/5: Elizabeth Jaikaran talks with Priya Arora about Trauma: A Collection of Short Stories. Powerhouse Archway, 6 p.m., free. Monday 8/7: Jill Eisenstadt reads Swell. Brooklyn Bridge Park, 7 p.m., free.

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Notable NYC: 4/1–4/7

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Saturday 4/1: Paolo Javier and Jill Magi join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 4/2: Robin Myers and translator Ezequiel Zaidenwerg discuss Conflations. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 5:30 p.m., free. Monday 4/3: Fiona Maazel, Alissa Nutting, Robert Lopez, Lance Olsen, and April Ayers Lawson join the Franklin Park Reading Series. Franklin Park, 8 […]

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Notable NYC: 2/25–3/3

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Saturday 2/25: Christian Hawkey and Himanshu Suri join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Emily Brandt and Ali Power join the SOLO reading series. Wendy’s Subway, 7 p.m., free. Sunday 2/26: Nicole Steinberg celebrates the release of Glass Actress with Niina Pollari, Sarah Jean Grimm, and Esther Lin. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 4 p.m., […]

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Notable NYC: 2/11–2/17

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Saturday 2/11: Immigrant Rally: Here to Stay. Washington Square Park, 2 p.m., free. Maryam Monalisa Gharavi and Jennifer Scappettone join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 2/12: Nicole Fix, Joanna C. Valente, Fraylie Nord, and Yardenne Greenspan join the Sundays at Erv’s reading series. Erv’s, 6 p.m., free. Peter Burghardt, Sara Wintz, […]

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Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jason Diamond

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Jason Diamond discusses his memoir Searching for John Hughes, confronting his childhood abuse, avoiding his parents, and writing about all of it.

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Notable NYC: 1/21–1/27

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Saturday 1/21: Women’s March on New York City. Resist. On Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, 47th St and 2nd Ave, 11 am, free. Eléna River, Ryan Collerd, and Carol Snow discuss works of poetry. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 7 p.m., free. Mahogany L Browne, Purvi Shah, and Lauren Whitehead join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. […]

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Notable NYC: 12/3–12/9

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  Saturday 12/3: Natalie Diaz and T’ai Freedom Ford join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 12/4: Jonathan Lethem discusses Italo Calvino. The Center for Fiction, 7 p.m., $8. Alexandra Kleeman and Kelly Luce join the Sunday Night Fiction series. Kleeman’s latest collection of stories, Intimations, feature neurotic characters with deranged comedy. […]

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Notable NYC: 11/26–12/2

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Saturday 11/26: Sarah Kay, Maeve Higgins, Phil Kaye, and Mark Doss read for refugees, as part of the Festival to Improve the World. The Wild Project, 4 p.m., $10. Monday 11/28: Jason Diamond launches Searching for John Hughes with a conversation with Danielle Henderson. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. David Rivard and Sarah Sarai join the […]

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Miserable Lives, All Lit by the Neon Glow

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At Harper’s Bazaar, Jason Diamond revisits the literary brat pack in the harsh morning light of thirty years later, examining their histories (real and really sensationalized) in hope of moving towards a new understanding of Jay McInerney, Bret Easton Ellis, Tama Janowitz, Donna Tartt, and Jill Eisenstadt—a more balanced understanding, of adults who are ready […]

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Notable NYC: 1/24–1/30

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Saturday 1/24: Barbara Elovic reads Other People’s Stories, poems. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. Sophie Seita and Ron Silliman join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Maxwell Donnewald, Jacob Kaplan, Bill Kemmler, Sam Regal, and Stephen Lloyd launch Sporadicus. Mellow Pages, 7:30 p.m., free. Sunday 1/25: Shelly Oria and Lee Matthew Goldberg join the […]

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Good Riddance to the Goodbye-to-New-York Essay

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Joan Didion’s “Goodbye to All That” has spawned a new literary genre: the personal screed about loving (or leaving) New York City.

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Notable NYC: 9/13–9/19

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Saturday 9/13: Sara Lippman reads from collection of stories, Doll Palace. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. Mitchell S. Jackson, Porochista Khakpour, Gabriel Roth, and Elissa Schappell read as part of LitCrawl, presented by Center for Fiction. KGB, 6 p.m., free. LitCrawl takes over the East Village. Mulitple Locations, 6 p.m., free.

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New, Old Salinger Stories

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Having realized the rights to three unpublished Salinger stories were unclaimed, small publisher Devault-Graves set about purchasing them. The stories were published earlier this week. But despite the fun of having a little more Salinger to read, some are unhappy with how the stories were released: They’re more innocent, more trusting, but ultimately, and unfortunately, they’re […]

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The Era of Celebrity Bookselling

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The Colbert Bump helped propel Edan Lepucki‘s California to the third spot on the New York Times bestseller list. Lena Dunham’s endorsement helped sell Adelle Waldman‘s The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. Celebrity and celebrity endorsements have long played a role in moving products. Jason Diamond, writing over at Flavorwire, explains that today’s endorsements go beyond […]

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NYPL Hosts Panel on Amazon

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The continuing battle between Amazon and Hachette was the focus of a panel discussion hosted by the New York Public Library last week featuring novelist James Patterson, publisher Morgan Entrekin, literary agent Tina Bennett, and several political theorists. Jason Diamond has a writeup at Flavorwire: The takeaway from the event was this: the trouble Amazon causes […]

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Critics vs. Readers

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Critics don’t seem to like Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, but that hasn’t stopped readers from buying more than a million copies of the novel. Vanity Fair poses the question: but is it art? The New Republic suggests this kind of criticism is infantile. Meanwhile, Flavorwire’s Jason Diamond thinks a bigger problem is the disconnect between critics and readers: […]

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Marveling At Roxane Gay

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The literary community loves Rumpus Essays Editor Roxanne Gay. She’s prolific, supportive, and a great writer. Jason Diamond, writing over at Flavorwire, explains further: While I can’t really comment on whether she’s from Krypton or offer any definitive knowledge of her sleep habits, as somebody who has read Gay’s work for a few years now, […]

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Still Writing Like a Motherfucker

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An article published in Flavorwire hails Cheryl Strayed (Rumpus’ very own Sugar) as a publishing hero. In Jason Diamond’s words, “Strayed is the rare type of writer who is both critically and commercially embraced, but also keeps her feet firmly planted in the literary world.” But how did this come to be? Diamond suggests that Strayed’s work ethic is the key. “Strayed has found […]

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The Midwest is the Future of American Literature

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Flavorwire’s Jason Diamond insists that writers can eschew New York City in favor of greener pastures, offering a comprehensive defense of Franzen country: A closer look at the literary map of the 50 states reveals that even if the publishing industry writ large is situated in New York and Los Angeles, some of the most exciting things going […]

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Rumpus Writers Help Define Modern Literature

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Flavorwire’s Jason Diamond has compiled a list of fifty books that defined the past five years of literature. From the universally acclaimed (Wolf Hall) to the controversial (what purpose did i serve in your life), from the literary heavyweights (Tenth of December) to the pop-culture juggernauts (The Hunger Games), these books “show what is great about […]

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Notable NYC: 11/16–11/22

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Saturday 11/16: Elizabeth Clark Wessel and Vladisalv Davizon read works in translation along with selections of their own poems. Molasses Books (Facebook), 8pm free. Laurent Binet discuses his new novel, HHhH with Paul La Farge. HHhH (2012) is translated from the French by Sam Taylor. McNally Jackson, 7pm, free. Sunday 11/17: Yvonne Garrett, Elizabeth Keenan, […]

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Alas, Poor Transatlantic Review!

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The Paris Review just celebrated its sixtieth birthday—and not a gray hair in sight! But many game-changing, sterling-quality literary magazines didn’t make it to that ripe old(ish) age. At Flavorwire, Jason Diamond rounds up some of the Paris Review‘s most promising peers and their untimely deaths.

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