Posts Tagged: Jonathan Lethem

On Saviors and Superheroes: A Conversation with Adam Nemett

By

Adam Nemett discusses his debut novel, WE CAN SAVE US ALL.

...more

Notable NYC: 11/10–11/16

By

Literary events in and around NYC this week!

...more

Notable San Francisco: 11/7–11/13

By

Literary events in and around the Bay Area this week!

...more

Notable Portland: 6/7–6/13

By

Literary events in and around Portland this week!

...more

Notable Los Angeles: 1/29–2/4

By

Literary events and readings in and around L.A. this week!

...more

Sound & Vision: Michael Hearst

By

Allyson McCabe talks with Michael Hearst, a founding member of One Ring Zero, about how he got his start in music and writing, and what he’s been working on recently.

...more

Notable Los Angeles: 4/3–4/9

By

Monday 4/3: Brooks Arthur Wachtel discusses and signs Lady Sherlock: Circle of the Smiling Dead. 7 p.m. at Book Soup. Tuesday 4/4: Bradley Spinelli with Robert Anasi discusses and signs The Painted Gun. 7 p.m. at Book Soup. Jenny Nordbak discusses her book The Scarlett Letters. 7:30 p.m. at Skylight Books.

...more

Notable NYC: 12/3–12/9

By

  Saturday 12/3: Natalie Diaz and T’ai Freedom Ford join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Sunday 12/4: Jonathan Lethem discusses Italo Calvino. The Center for Fiction, 7 p.m., $8. Alexandra Kleeman and Kelly Luce join the Sunday Night Fiction series. Kleeman’s latest collection of stories, Intimations, feature neurotic characters with deranged comedy. […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Sometimes, literary magazines fold. It happens all the time because of funding, or manpower, or editorial differences. Usually, print back issues remain for sale and online content is preserved indefinitely, or at least until someone forgets to renew the domain. But this does not seem to be the case with Black Clock, the respected literary […]

...more

Leopard Print

By

I couldn’t believe there could be a famous book that was so radically unsatisfying. I remember thinking, how can he even be a famous author if he fucks you over this badly? It just seemed like a disaster. At the Atlantic, Jonathan Lethem writes about discovering Franz Kafka as a teenager. Later, Kafka’s ‘leopards’ aphorism would influence […]

...more

Not Like a Baseball Team

By

Stories are much more unified and coherent. One gesture, one metaphor, one set piece. For Signature, Jennie Yabroff interviews one of the three “Brooklyn Jonathans,” Jonathan Lethem, on the creation of his latest short story collection, Lucky Alan: his move to Southern California, the assembly of the book, and the editing—oh, the editing.

...more

The Video Game Literati

By

Tobias Carroll, writing for Hazlitt, dissects the influence video games have had on literature, from writers like Ernest Cline of Ready Player One to Jonathan Lethem and an entire literary anthology, Press Start to Play. We’re only waiting for Franzen to admit his obsession with playing as Oddjob in Goldeye 64, making all his friends hate […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Leave it to The Toast to give us a story told by a mermaid as opposed to a story about one. And leave it to The Toast to find a very good mermaid storyteller indeed. On Wednesday, they released “Mermaids at the End of the Universe: A Short Story” by Kendra Fortmeyer, featuring illustrations by Stephanie […]

...more

Good Riddance to the Goodbye-to-New-York Essay

By

Joan Didion’s “Goodbye to All That” has spawned a new literary genre: the personal screed about loving (or leaving) New York City.

...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #58: Crowdsourcing

By

Music-obsessive activity, in general, appears to be about music. You could, on the surface, mistake it for being about music. But in fact what it is about is memory and love.

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Margaret Atwood released Stone Mattress, a collection of “wonderfully weird short stories.” Stone Mattress is Atwood’s eighth collection of stories, not to mention her 14 novels and other formidable volumes of poetry, children’s literature, and nonfiction. Reviewers across the boards are heralding this most recent work as “wise, sharp,” and “rich.” Let’s look at […]

...more

On Criticism

By

At The Awl, Maria Bustillos breaks down the back-and-forth between Jonathan Lethem and James Wood over Lethem’s The Fortress of Solitude, interpreting both Wood’s original review and Lethem’s recent response. Ruminating on the possibility of improved communication between authors, readers, and critics, Bustillos locates where the process of reading is “working” for both authors. “This […]

...more

A History of Plagiarism

By

What do Bob Dylan, Eli Wallach and Nabokov have in common? Artistic appropriation. And it’s not just those guys—but possibly all artists. Appropriation, recasting stories and lines into another form, is inherently a part of all art. Jonathan Lethem’s essay, “The Ecstasy of Influence: A Plagiarism,” discusses appropriation, plagiarism and the historically-relevant participants of this […]

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

Jonathan Lethem has been hired for David Foster Wallace’s old teaching post at Pomona. (via @maudnewton) “Lots of people in Indiana Jones hats today. I approve.” From @WriterDaniel at this Twitter roundup from the LA Times Festival of Books. GIANT’s got a pretty good summary of what different kinds of editors really do. Thankfully, they […]

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

Who doesn’t like bookplate porn? (via) The Rumpus doesn’t do pop culture, but if you happen to have written something about Lady Gaga, you might want to send it here. (PS. GIANT doesn’t lie. Kate Durbin is awesome.) Apparently, this Orange Prize judge thinks women — at least the women nominated for the Orange Prize […]

...more

Notable New York, This Week 1/25 – 1/31

By

This week in New York Lydia Davis and Richard Howard read, John Wray, Heidi Julavits and Sarah Manguso discuss ebooks at Melville House, Of Montreal and Damon & Naomi perform, Lapham’s Quarterly celebrates the launch of its Religion Issue, artists recreate the filmography of David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest character James Incandenza, and Selected Shorts […]

...more