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Posts Tagged: literary journals

The Rumpus Interview with Becky Tuch

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Becky Tuch discusses founding The Review Review, motherhood, creativity, and the future of literary magazines.

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Failing at Gender

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An essay by Daniel Harris in the most recent issue of The Antioch Review has sparked a backlash from the transgender community, with many members of the trans community feeling Harris missed the point completely, and worse—wishes they would just accept themselves as they are, in their “true” gender. At The Millions, Clarence Harlan Orsi writes: […]

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The Dark Web’s Literary Journal

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For Motherboard at VICE, Joseph Cox interviews the two creators of The Torist, the first literary journal created and available solely on the dark web. Robert W. Gehl, the public liaison for the journal, noted that creating a journal on the dark web was meant “to swim against the current popular conceptions of anonymity and […]

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Disguising Payments Hurts Writers

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Literary journals don’t always pay contributors. But unpaid contributions are less of a problem for writers than literary journals that conceal their pay rates. Allison Williams, over at The Review Review, takes a look at how some publications handle the issue. She points out that the issue of non-payment might be fine for some writers, but […]

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Not All Online Journals Are Created Equal

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Online journals have evolved into legitimate publications, and print journals are not necessarily better simply because they have physical form. But that doesn’t make all online journals equal. The Review Review details important criteria for writers trying to assess which digital markets are right for them, and offers tips on how to find those publications.

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There’s No Crying in Writing

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Thrice Fiction editor RW Spryszak has some advice for writers: rejection isn’t personal. Sending hate mail to editors is no way to get published. Writers may resent changes that editors request, but it’s all part of the process: Writers need to have the perspective to understand that most editors in the small press world also […]

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Austin’s Lit Scene Heats Up

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We’ve written before about the blossoming Austin publishing scene, particularly the small press A Strange Object and their first title, Three Scenarios in which Hana Sasaki Grows a Tail by Kelly Luce. Now the New York Times is taking notice, too (about a year later than us, but hey, nobody’s perfect). Read their article about Austin’s flourishing […]

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Giving Editors What They Want

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For emerging writers, submitting pieces to literary magazines can be like hacking through a jungle of confusion with a guess-machete. This piece from The Review Review, titled “What Editors Want,” will clear a path straight through for you. A teaser: If you get a standard rejection with something addition written on it—“Sorry” or (better) “Try us […]

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Alas, Poor Transatlantic Review!

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The Paris Review just celebrated its sixtieth birthday—and not a gray hair in sight! But many game-changing, sterling-quality literary magazines didn’t make it to that ripe old(ish) age. At Flavorwire, Jason Diamond rounds up some of the Paris Review‘s most promising peers and their untimely deaths.

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Warm, Wise Submissions Tips

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Submit to the idea that submitting your work can teach you where you’ve come from as a writer, where you’re at as a writer, and where you might be going as a writer. For Gulf Coast‘s blog, Joseph Scapellato enumerates reasons to submit your creative work to literary magazines. “So that you might be productively humbled […]

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Good News for Literary Journals

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What’s the difference between a literary journal and a mayfly? The literary journal’s reputation for short lifespans might not be justified. According to Daniel Nester and Steve Black, authors of the article “Here Today, Here Tomorrow: On the Lifespan of the Literary Magazine,” literary journals are actually far more resilient than you may think. Using […]

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Where Does Your Fiction Belong?

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BookFox notes an interesting pattern: “In the last few years, many prestigious literary journals have moved to a two-tier model for publishing: they maintain their print journal for the big-name authors, and create an online space to publish emerging authors.” This seems to be a no-brainer for traditional journals. They can publish riskier stories while […]

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Are Printed Literary Journals Imperiled?

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“For me, if there’s a piece of writing that I care about, I want to have the physical object,” says Brigid Hughes, editor of the literary journal A Public Space. “There’s a permanence to it, a different kind of permanence than if you find it on a website. You’re bringing together these different voices and […]

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