Posts Tagged: literature

The Rumpus Interview with Vanessa Hua

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Vanessa Hua discusses her debut collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, writing fiction in order to understand life as an American-born child of immigrants, and the importance of literary community.

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Crybaby College Students and Their Bogus Trophies

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I’m a small blue dot living in a blood-red corner of a red state, so I’ve grown accustomed to hearing right wing talking points. I don’t like them, but they surface as regularly in my southwest Florida town as white egrets on the highway and dolphins in the Gulf. Talking points at the grocery store, […]

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How Will Our Current-Day Literature Be Studied in the Future?

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With so many books winning so many prizes over the years (Nobel this, Pulitzer that), one can’t help but wonder how our generation’s sense of literature might be described in the future. What patterns and obsessions and current trends might be considered as critical to understanding our era? Over at The Huffington Post, read some answers speculating on just […]

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And the Nobel Prize in Literature Goes To…

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Bob Dylan? At Electric Literature, Lincoln Michel acknowledged that no one is quite sure how to feel about the news. At Slate, Stephen Metcalf praises Bob Dylan’s genius, but argues that he’s a musician, not a poet: The objection here hinges in the definition of the word literature. You wouldn’t give the literary prize to […]

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Podcatcher #4: Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

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Jonathan Van Ness discusses his podcast, Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness, fierceness, curiosity, and hairstyles.

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Literature’s Future Is Interactive

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Tech evangelicals believe that static, non-visual storytelling like books must evolve and adapt to continue to attractive audiences in the future. Kill Screen takes a look at some of these new types of literary storytelling, like Madefire’s digital storytelling app that features animation technology, and Tapas Media, which builds games around chapters.

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The Rumpus Interview with Brendan Jones

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Brendan Jones talks about his debut novel, The Alaskan Laundry, living in Alaska, his time as a Wallace Stegner Fellow, and living and loving what you write.

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Immortalizing History

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Literature continually reminds us that we are not alone and (to paraphrase Kundera) that things are not always as simple as they seem. With so many stories, histories, characters and figures populating a reader’s mind, it’s easy for us to take for granted the liberation that literature imparts. Considering our wide and fast access to […]

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The Literary Deadly Sins

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For the New York Times‘s Bookends column, Rivka Galchen and Benjamin Moser muse on the question of which transgressions in literature are unforgivable: For me, the unforgivable sin in literature is the same as that in life: the assumption of certainty and the moral high ground. That words like “righteous” and “pious” are often used to […]

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Is Writing Art or Profession?

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For those who start within the establishment, professional writing is likely to correspond to drudgery, and they’ll seek to escape it. For those on the outside looking in, it’s a mark of legitimacy. The reasons behind why writers write is arguably broken into two camps: for art and as a profession. Certainly neither is more […]

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Reporting as Literature

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Reporter and writer Svetlana Alexievich recently won the Nobel Prize for literature. In a piece for the New Yorker, Philip Gourevitch brings up some questions that this poses about the relationship between reportage literature and other forms—is one more necessary or relevant in our current times? Should one form be envious or attempt to reproduce the effects of […]

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Dan Weiss’s Morning Coffee

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(Dan Weiss is out on tour with his band The Yellow Dress. He’ll be back on August 3rd.) It’s dubious whether these parents read either book. It’s not personal, it’s just privileged. Fact-checking the infamous nail salon story. Being bored in literature. A professor warns students away from the University of Wisconsin. Roxane Gay on the […]

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The End of Literature

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The rapid rise of “trigger warnings” is starting to impact literature curriculums. For instance, Columbia University students lobbied to include warnings on Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a core text in Western Literature syllabi. Columbia refused to include warnings, but essentially capitulated by expunging the text from its curriculum entirely. Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita were […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Jay Rubin

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Author and translator Jay Rubin talks about his new novel, The Sun Gods, translating Haruki Murakami into English, and the internment of Japanese citizens during World War II.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Reading Don Quijote with My Mother

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“That’s the anthem I would have sung at my original graduation if the university had stayed open,” my mother said.

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