Posts Tagged: Maria Konnikova

Notable NYC: 3/3–3/9

By

Literary events and readings in and around New York City this week!

...more

Notable NYC: 2/18–2/24

By

Saturday 2/18: Ryan Dobran and Wendy Letterman join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Kristen Gallagher and Ed Steck celebrate new books from Skeleton Man Press. The Glove, 6 p.m., free. Sunday 2/19: Elizabeth Hall and Melissa Buzzeo read poetry. Berl’s Poetry Shop, 6:30 p.m., free. Monday 2/20: Not My President’s Day march. Columbus […]

...more

The Read Along: Omar Musa

By

In the second installment of The Read Along, Omar Musa shares how airplane delays can lead to productive reading sessions and how easy it is to get sucked into Internet wormholes about geodesic domes.

...more

Blocking Writer’s Block

By

The New Yorker’s Maria Konnikova reveals the cause of writer’s block, the psychological state of those that have it and those that don’t, and how to combat it: …many symptoms of writer’s block are the kinds of problems psychiatrists think about. Unhappy writers, it seemed, were unhappy in their own ways, and would require therapies tailored […]

...more

Handwriting Matters

By

A new scientific study has demonstrated that learning to write by hand before learning to type helps in developing children’s brains, and the benefits stretch from childhood to adulthood memory-wise. Psychologist (and Rumpus interviewee) Maria Konnikova explains on the New York Times: Cursive or not, the benefits of writing by hand extend beyond childhood. For adults, typing may […]

...more

It’s All Context

By

The Internet offers us near-limitless amounts of information, often for free, at the touch of our fingertips. But it’s also a tool, and like all tools, is subject to the ways in which it is (or isn’t) put to use. Rumpus interviewee Maria Konnikova considers how the lack of contextualization of Internet information shapes the way […]

...more

By Any Other Name

By

How are we affected by our names? An article in The New Yorker by Rumpus interviewee Maria Konnikova discusses the implications of given names as indicators of class and racial backgrounds, and explores the impact that names have on the way we are treated by those around us. We see a name, implicitly associate different characteristics […]

...more