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Posts Tagged: NPR

Podcatcher #3: Poetry Jawns

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Emma Sanders and Alina Pleskova charm us with their affection for each other, DIY ethos, and belief on Poetry Jawns, what matters is the work.

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YA Novels Help Parents Talk Sex

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A discussion with your kid about the birds and the bees might be one of the more intimidating moments of parenthood, but YA novelists can lend a hand. When YA writers confront modern issues of sex, rape, consent, abuse, and gender, they help parents—and schools—introduce these sensitive topics: Consent doesn’t even have to be about sex, per se, […]

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told.

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Song of the Day: “Misunderstood”

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The incredible cacophony of the bridge on Wilco’s definitive ballad “Misunderstood” is all the more striking because of its contrast with the rest of the tender, harmonious song. The brilliance of songwriter Jeff Tweedy is on full display here as the speaker laments his own bad attitude with a self-deprecating tone. A quiet and understated […]

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Crime Girls

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NPR explores whether and how putting “girl” in the title of your crime novel will garner favorable comparisons to heavy-hitters like Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Paula Hawkins’s The Girl on the Train—and therefore benefit from an increase in sales: So in a way, the girl insignia is trying to tie it into this larger marketing […]

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Food Fit for a Pope

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He loves Argentinian empanadas and dulce de leche. In 2015, he said that if he had only one wish, it would be to travel unrecognized to a pizzeria and have a slice—or two or three. In other words, he may be protected by the world’s smallest army and be responsible for the spiritual governance of […]

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Between Two Worlds

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“‘We have to leave the country,’ I informed my wife as I went over the final proofs. ‘We won’t be able to stay here after this book is published.’” NPR looks at the satirical novel/memoir Native by Sayed Kashua and explores how Kashua transverses the two different worlds that make up Jerusalem.

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Dickens and the Lottery

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If you’re disappointed you didn’t win the Powerball jackpot, head over to NPR to read Charles Dickens’s account of the lottery in Naples, an event he seemed to find both amusing and horrifying: Dickens heard of a man being thrown fatally from his horse, only to be pounced on by a punter—a person who places a […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Dean Koontz

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Dean Koontz talks about his newest novel, Ashley Bell, overcoming self-doubt, and “what this incredibly beautiful language of ours allows you to do.”

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In Her Own Words

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Over at NPR, authors Claire Vaye Watkins and Marlon James talk about Watkins’s recent essay, “On Pandering,” which she describes as: …internalizing the sexism that I’d encountered in the writing world, and the world beyond, and adjusting what I wrote accordingly so that it would be more well-received … by the people I wanted to […]

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Art as a Tool for Action

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Over at NPR, Molly Crabapple discusses her new memoir Drawing Blood, her involvement in Occupy Wall Street, and how she became a political artist: …for a long time I felt like going to protests was the same as—you know, when people go to church but they don’t really believe in God? But they think, oh, better […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Debra Monroe

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Debra Monroe talks about her new memoir, My Unsentimental Education, the future of the genre, and how the Internet has changed what it means to be human.

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A Misreading of Misery

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NPR traces the history of Stephen King’s Misery from the novel, to the film, and, most recently, to the stage, and argues that this journey may have caused the story t0 lose a few key components: It is almost literally drained of blood and, more important, it is drained of urgency.

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Cook Like a Prisoner

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In prison, Gustavo “Goose” Alvarez learned to love ramen. Now Alvarez has a book of recipes based on his time in prison, interspersed with stories like the time when food saved his life during a race riot: “They were stuck there for hours, freezing in the cold,” Alvarez says of his would-be attackers. “This older […]

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Many Happy Returns, Gregor Samsa!

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My favorite version of the text—if only because it was the one that came to me when I most needed it—is the 1972 edition, translated and edited by Stanley Corngold, that my uncle handed me that day in Bogotá. Over at NPR, Juan Vidal writes about his love for Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis to celebrate the 100th anniversary of its release.

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Supporting Black Male Teachers

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Elissa Nadworny at NPR’s Education Team interviews a researcher and former teacher, Travis Bristol, on the decline of black men in the teaching profession. Bristol’s research discovered that, in several cities, the overall number of black teachers had fallen and the largest loss was among black male teachers. Bristol discusses the minimized roles available for […]

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R.L. Stine’s Deep Dark Secret

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In advanced of the release of the Goosebumps movie, NPR’s Colin Dwyer reveals that children’s author R.L. Stine originally hoped to write humor: “I started when I was 9. I don’t know, I was this weird kid. I found a typewriter, I dragged it into my room and I would just stay in my room, typing — typing […]

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