Posts Tagged: Pankaj Mishra

Writing from the Margins into the Universal

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Sahota takes it further in “The Year of the Runaways”: “What decadence this belonging rubbish was, what time the rich must have if they could sit around and weave great worries out of such threadbare things.” With an eye on two new novels by Indian writers, and perspective from writers such as Salman Rushdie, Jhumpa […]

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The Moral of the Story

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At the New York Times, Alice Gregory and Pankaj Mishra discuss the role of moralism in the novel—and conclude that authors should seek to question and provoke rather than preach: Not only does moral preoccupation corrupt the artfulness of fiction, but fiction is an inefficient and insincere vehicle for moralizing. If an author’s motive is to […]

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Highbrow, Lowbrow, Middlebrow, Nobrow

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Critics have been locked in debate over the Internet’s effect on cultural production and reception for as long as most millennials can remember, exclamations like “democratized content” and “death of the novel” appearing at every click and turn. In this week’s New York Times “Bookends” column, two writers discuss whether dated categories are still applicable […]

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Do Writers Also Have to Be Protesters?

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Pankaj Mishra has always been a politically outspoken writer, so when Mo Yan, who has defended the Chinese government’s censorship, won the Nobel Prize, Mishra was the last person anyone expected to defend him. But he did, asking, “Do we ever expose the political preferences of Mo Yan’s counterparts in the West to such harsh […]

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Fiction or Non fiction: That is the question

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Is it true that nowadays nonfiction is more relevant than fiction? Pankaj Mishra and Rivka Galchen answer the question and both their answers are dissimilar. Mishra answers, “Even writers working within the old verities of stability and coherence — we cannot do without some of them — continue to produce persuasive fictions.” Galchen observes, “Fiction […]

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