Posts Tagged: postmodern

The Genius and the Nobody: Lynne Tillman’s Men and Apparitions

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Make it new, the modernists said. But how to rebuild the living body?

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Discomfort, Desire, and Drugs: Talking with Ben Gwin

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Ben Gwin discusses his debut novel, Clean Time: The True Story of Ronald Regan Middleton, the book’s unique structure, and writing satire.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #63: Patrick Madden

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Patrick Madden teaches writing at Brigham Young University and is the author of the essay collection Quotidiana. His essays frequently appear in literary magazines and have been featured in The Best Creative Nonfiction and The Best American Spiritual Writing anthologies. He pays close attention to the details of the every day, infusing humor and self-deprecation, combining […]

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Swinging Modern Sounds #73: Prince Rogers Nelson, Guitar Player: A Symposium

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I started thinking about additional, more slantwise ways we might talk about his legacy. What if I organized a bunch of guitar players?

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Daniel Felsenfeld | Rumpus Music

A Year In The Life: Premiere Perseveration

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I once, years ago, sat next to a colleague at a premiere, and as the lights dimmed I whispered, “Why do I do this to myself?” And yet, I persist.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: Carol

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Carol is a powerful woman with enviable self-knowledge, effortlessly creating an erotic, sensual ideal of herself as a covert spectacle for queer midcentury women.

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Irony Genius Vs. Realism Hero

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If Franzen is our genius realist, and DFW our genius postmodernist — how might they meld irony and sincerity? In an excerpt over at Salon from his new book, Keep It Fake: Inventing an Authentic Life, Eric G. Wilson talks irony, realism, postmodernism, David Foster Wallace, and Jonathan Franzen.

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Lighten Up

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Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice is a light neo-noir comedy, just like the Pynchon novel that inspired it. Despite our eagerness to overanalyze film adaptations of complicated books, Katie Kilkenny warns us not to take this one too seriously: Inherent Vice inherently rewards only half-serious analysis… Semiotics nerds, who so love Pynchon, might call the […]

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