Posts Tagged: privilege

A Séance of a Book: Talking with Allie Rowbottom

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Allie Rowbottom discusses her debut memoir, JELL-O GIRLS.

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Voices on Addiction: A Review of The Recovering

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As recovering addicts, we must love ourselves back to the source, love our shameful bits and decimations and not just our reconciliations and resurrections.

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The Thread: The Masked Man

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What I know and don’t know about men matters. What men know and don’t know about themselves matters more.

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ENOUGH: Please Have a Seat

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A Rumpus series of work by women and non-binary people that engages with rape culture, sexual assault, and domestic violence.

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Tarnished, Shiny Exteriors: Kate Braverman’s A Good Day for Seppuku

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With A Good Day for Seppuku, Braverman has written a collection of intense images and exacting language

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It’s All about Positionality: Talking with Kayleb Rae Candrilli

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Kayleb Rae Candrilli discusses their debut collection, What Runs Over, reclaiming memory through poetry, and the political act of being happy.

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The Burden of Teachable Moments

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My voice begins to crack so I clear my throat. I look at each one of the girls one by one. The heat in me rises. My skin feels like the Texas pavement in July.

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Setting aside Time for Magic: Talking with Myriam Gurba

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Myriam Gurba discusses her new memoir, MEAN, her writing process, and why she has hope for patriarchy’s dissolution.

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The Ability to Pass Becomes Her Cage: Talking with SJ Sindu

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SJ Sindu discusses her new novel, Marriage of a Thousand Lies, queer readings of Hindu scriptures, and issues of privilege and power.

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What Do I Do With My Fear?: A Conversation with Megan Stielstra

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Megan Stielstra discusses her new essay collection, The Wrong Way to Save Your Life, fear, privilege, and the intersection of politics and everyday life.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #104: sam sax

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I could write a bullet list of sam’s sax’s recent accomplishments, but the wiser thing would be to advise you to pick up his newly released book MADNESS.

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Basura

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[T]erms like “white trash” and basura most accurately reveal those who are doing the defining. Consider what we throw away, and why. Look at what we throw away. Think about the reasons why.

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The Myth of White Male Rage: Jared Yates Sexton’s The People Will Rise

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[I]n a book that argues we are divided and stuck in our own echo chambers, Sexton’s own divide goes unexamined, his own echo chamber unchallenged.

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The Election and the Ash Borer

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Does it matter what words a sign says when a symbol says so much more? A white X. A carved swastika. Things get torn down from less.

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The Summer of Lana Del Rey

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Three summers ago, I did nothing but drive around Middlebury, Vermont, blasting Lana Del Rey and chain-smoking cigarettes. It was—and I will be dramatic, because that is how it felt—an act of survival. That summer I was in an academic program where we were only allowed to speak or be spoken to in French. But […]

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Blur, Cross, Pulverize, Confront, Remember: Talking with James Allen Hall

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James Allen Hall on I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, unmaking boundaries, and book titles.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be.

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What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy.

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Are You a Trans Ally?

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Often well-intentioned cis folks like myself feel kind of overwhelmed by all there is to know and, not wanting to sound ignorant or hurtful, just kind of keep to the sidelines. But it doesn’t take a degree in gender studies to be a trans ally (nor does it require you to have an LGBTQ friend). […]

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Wealth and the American Dream

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Two recent novels, The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney and Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty by Ramona Ausubel, explore privilege and entitlement, and what happens when wealth disappears. It can be hard to feel sorry for trust fund kids when you live paycheck to paycheck, but: From some distance, it’s a parable about the […]

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The Privilege of Innocence

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In a powerful essay at Electric Literature, Nicole Dennis-Benn writes on innocence as a privilege that is not afforded to black children: Truth is, there is nothing parents can do. There is nothing black parents can do to protect their children and their children’s innocence. Diamond Reynold’s four-year-old daughter can attest to this as she […]

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