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Posts Tagged: review

I’m Cold, Please Touch Me: The Freezer Door by Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

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Sycamore wrote this book long before pandemic time, and yet it couldn’t have arrived at a better moment.

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The Light Endures: 13th Balloon by Mark Bibbins

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Grief begs to be analogized, not to be tamed exactly, but somehow made approachable.

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A Myriad Reckoning: Seismic: Seattle, City of Literature

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The collective reimagining in Seismic calls for literary revolution.

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A Literary Tasting Menu: My Year Abroad by Chang-rae Lee

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Simply put, the novel’s heart is not political but sensual.

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A Poetics of Questions: The Bower by Connie Voisine

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To learn is perhaps Voisine’s primary goal in writing the poems in The Bower.

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Asking the Right Questions: Yaa Gyasi’s Transcendent Kingdom

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Transcendent Kingdom becomes an experiment in itself.

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Not Looking Away: The State She’s In by Lesley Wheeler

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But look at this poet-speaker speaking the unspeakable!

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When Ideals Meet Reality: The Contradictions by Sophie Yanow

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You want to live by your ideals, but it’s hard to make them align with reality.

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A Language for Extinction: Zaina Alsous’s A Theory of Birds

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And if you ask of her to come to you, her answer is refusal.

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Haunted by Hoax: Paul Griner’s The Book of Otto and Liam

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But Griner is too skilled a realist to allow The Book of Otto and Liam to become a simple revenge story.

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The Violent and the Sensual: original kink by Jubi Arriola-Headley

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Violence can be turned around, turned into pleasure, or an act of freedom, or an act of defiance.

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In and of the Wreck: Together in a Sudden Strangeness

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In its imagery and mood, the collection feels distinctly April.

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Possibility Is Spellbinding: The Lightness by Emily Temple

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In short, lightness is the capacity to leave without regret.

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Reading the Landscape of the Past: Jessica J. Lee’s Two Trees Make a Forest

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Learning to read a landscape can reveal a deep history.

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The Worlds We Inhabit: Home: New Arabic Poems

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These writers expand the meaning of the word home by virtue of their lives and their writing.

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Barbara Berman’s 2020 Holiday Poetry Shout-Out

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Barbara Berman reviews four books in her 2020 Holiday Poetry Shout-Out

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A Different Kind of Butterfly Effect: Frances Cha’s If I Had Your Face

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[Y]ou can’t grow up in a cultural milieu and be immune to what it loves.

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The Complex Disability Representation We Need: Rebekah Taussig’s Sitting Pretty

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What Taussig does, then, is ground these ideas in reality through her own lived experiences.

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Spotlight: The Rumpus Review of John Stanley’s Little Lulu

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For the longest time, John Stanley’s Little Lulu was one of the best kept secrets in comics.

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Desire Makes Storytellers of Us All: Anthropica by David Hollander

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What a fitting end to the postmodern literary experiment. Or are we just getting warmed up?

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Documenting Existence: Deed by Justin Wymer

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Wymer is grappling with survival, with the cost of the duplicity of identity.

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Still Wouldst Thou Sing: Nightingale by Paisley Rekdal

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Figures from antiquity—those masks of learned, privileged poets—are rendered utterly contemporary, down to earth.

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