Posts Tagged: Richard Brody

Portrait of an Actress

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In an article for the New Yorker, Richard Brody writes about the newly restored 1967 film by Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, Romy: Anatomy of a Face. The film “offers an intimate view of the actress Romy Schneider, revealing crucial conflicts behind the image of a public figure who loomed large in the German national imagination—and within the […]

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At Heaven’s Gates

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At the New Yorker, Richard Brody shares a eulogy for director Michael Cimino: Cimino’s life work is a cinema of mourning, an art of grief, a nightmare of memory that finds its sole redemption in ecstasy—the heightened perception that transforms experience into a grand internal spectacle, which finds its own embodiment in Cimino’s own profound visual imagination.

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The Loneliest Art

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Does screenwriting qualify as “real” writing? Over at the New Yorker, Richard Brody wonders what F. Scott Fitzgerald’s failed shot at Hollywood reveals about film as an industry and as an art: Fitzgerald was undone by his screenwriting-is-writing mistake. It’s a notion that has its basis in artistic form. Look at Fitzgerald’s books: they are […]

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How Critics Affect Artists

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An artist’s work can take years to complete, while a critic’s take on said art can be formulated in a matter of hours. This distinction is pointed out early on in Richard Brody’s discussion of criticism at The New Yorker.  Brody does not argue that critics should be considered inferior to artists, rather that they […]

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